Flour Bakery | Kristin Teig
Food & Drink

The 21 Best Bakeries in America

Updated On 03/02/2018 at 04:41PM EST
Jesse Hsu

Arcade Bakery

New York, New York

Walk down Church Street unknowingly, and you’d simply never discover Arcade Bakery. The name is stamped onto the outside of the office building, but it’s otherwise hidden 300 feet into the building’s lobby, a sleek set-up of counter-service pastries and coffee, with bakers fiddling with dough in the open kitchen. It’s bread that’s founder Roger Gural’s muse -- crisp sourdough loaves and towering vanilla pear and buckwheat baguettes -- but Arcade showcases a slew of French-influenced pastries (sweet and savory croissants, caramel apple brioches, whiskey-pecan babka) for the many lucky people who work upstairs and rely on warm baked goods rather than chips from the vending machine. Come during lunch hour and pair a flaky croissant with a mightily stacked sandwich or the just-baked pizza, then shout at everyone on Church Street that they’re breezing past one of America’s best bakeries.

Albert Law

b. patisserie

San Francisco, California

If you've never had the buttery Breton pastry kouign amann, first, shame on you, and second, head here for the finest version of it outside of France. The extremely talented pastry chef Belinda Leong started the bakery several years ago, and has since turned into a wild success thanks in large part to her sugary French cake. That item alone would warrant inclusion here, but paired up with a selection of tartines, a rainbow of macarons, and the legendary 10-Hour Apple Tart -- an impossibly balanced apple confit with almond streusel that cooks for half a day -- B. Patisserie becomes next-level delicious.

Babettes Artisan Breads

Denver, Colorado

Denver's food/drink market The Source is filled with standouts, but Babettes is a destination. Proof: it sells out of almost all of its five to eight breads (porridge bread, a daily country loaf, rye) and 12-16 pastries (apple croissants, molten-center chocolate cake) every day. That's why showing up at 8am -- when the sweets and breads come piping hot out of the over -- is your best bet. And although some might say the bread looks "burnt," the real food nerds know better -- it's caramelized, moist, and delicious.

Baked and Wired

Baked and Wired

Washington, DC

Once you’ve set foot in Baked and Wired, it’s simple to see how it got its name: “Baked” because of the unending roster of baked goods, and “wired,” because the place stocks beans from roasters like Stumptown, Intelligentsia, and Elixr. When it comes to the baked stuff, it’s easy to start hyperventilating: load up on savory buttermilk biscuits (bacon chive Cheddar! Spicy sausage cilantro!), the beloved cakecups swirled with bright frosting, homemade Fig Newtons, and ice cream sandwiches (both the cookies and ice cream are made in-house). Flavor combinations and product names tend to launch a smile (the Pretty Bitchin’ cakecup boasts chocolate cake with crunchy peanut butter frosting, while the Big Ass and Little Ass cookie are sugar cookie cutouts piled with buttercream glaze), which is probably one of the many reasons why everyone is always happy in there.

Sean Cooley/Thrillist

Baker Miller

Chicago, Illinois

From a husband and wife team (the Millers, get it?) who helped launch another bakery that was a strong contender for this list (Bang Bang Pie Shop), Baker Miller's setting itself apart by milling its own carefully sourced grains. You know what works even better? Incomparable sweet treats (s'mores pie, sourdough cinnamon rolls) and breads (order the "Toast Bar," and you'll be forever changed) that make you feel slightly better about loading up on carbs because you at least know they were sourced and treated with care. Bonus: They're not technically a baked good, but the grits and oatmeal bowls, always with some sort of seasonal toppings, are not to be missed.

Fat Rice

The Bakery at Fat Rice

Chicago, Illinois

The Macau-style culinary wizards at Fat Rice have long been defying expectations by smashing Eastern and Western influences together with gleeful abandon, and the restaurant’s expansion into a bakery next door takes that notion and runs. Hard. Well, not too hard. It’s actually really hard to run after crushing the joint’s famous hot dog bun, an unholy union of a Chicago-style hot dog -- sport peppers and all -- and a sweet Chinese bun. There are also ube milk bars, sweet malasadas loaded with coconut cream, and miso brownies. But the real coup here is the Macau Rice Crisp, an ungodly delicious take on Rice Krispies treats laced with pork floss, seaweed, and fish-sauce caramel that dances between sweet, savory, and “holy shit” beautifully.

CH Patisserie

CH Patisserie

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

After winning the World Pastry Championships and an entire season of Top Chef while commanding lines out the door as the assistant pastry chef at Bellagio, Chris Hanmer really only had one place to go: South Dakota. Yep, rather than being the 947th reality TV chef to open his own spot in a New York or Miami, Chris Hanmer opted to be a big cock in a small field and opened this gem right on the main drag in Sioux Falls. Inside are desserts that are up there with what you'll find in cities that don't require two connecting flights, like the petit gateau carrot cake with cream cheese, vanilla bean, and caramel glaze.

Thomas Schauer

Dominique Ansel Bakery

New York, New York

Yes, he invented the Cronut™, but we wouldn’t single out French pastry wizard Dominique Ansel merely for rolling a croissant into a circle. Despite the proverbial lines that snake out the door at 7am every morning and the blood feud that results over the 350 daily baked croissant-doughnut hybrids, Ansel still updates his cabinet with new science-defying baked goods. There are his frozen s’mores, for one -- vanilla custard ice cream and chocolate wafers encased in a behemoth of a marshmallow -- that are torched to order, and cookie shots that are shaped like shot glasses, lined with dark chocolate, and filled with Tahitian vanilla milk. He’s also got quite the inventory of traditional French desserts like chocolate eclairs and tarte tatins, if you’d rather not wait in line before dawn.

Easy Tiger

Easy Tiger

Austin, Texas

If you think it’s not often you stumble across a bake shop/beer garden combo, but you’ve clearly never been to Easy Tiger (plus this is Austin, after all). It’s here that house-made pretzels and charred sausages merge with crusty baguettes, semolina batards, and sugar-topped cinnamon knots, and it’s from this bake shop that many of Austin’s esteemed restaurants and coffee shops get their baked goods and breads. Pair morning delicacies like the Tiger Claw, brimming with spiced pecan filling, with Texas Coffee Traders coffee or a slew of tea drinks. Once it hits 11am, head downstairs to the beer garden below or the always bustling outdoor patio to feast on warm pretzels and house-made beer cheese.

Kristin Teig

Flour Bakery + Cafe

Boston, Massachusetts

Opened 15 years ago as a solo bakery in the South End that peddled the world’s greatest pecan sticky buns (suck it, Bobby Flay), Joanne Chang’s Flour has grown into Boston’s nationally acclaimed (and favorite) pastry and sandwich empire. And although that empire -- now with eight outposts -- may have been built on a pile of buns (and chocolate brioche and old-fashioned sour cream coffee cake and///), it specializes in more than just breakfast. You’d be remiss not to munch on a roasted lamb sandwich stuffed with cucumber raita, shaved fennel, and herbed tahini, followed by something sweet, of course: Try a slice of Boston’s finest Boston cream pie and several (or a dozen, we’re not here to judge) homemade Oreos.

Alan Weiner

Ken's Artisan Bakery

Portland, Oregon

Ken Forkish became a Portland legend by bringing his wondrous, wood-fired pizzas to the city in a time when charred crust and garden-fresh ingredients were all but unheard of. Those pies are available here on Mondays, but for the rest of the week, Ken’s Bakery lets loose on all things yeasty, with loaves ranging from a bouncy ciabatta to a stellar French rye in addition to impossibly satisfying brioche buns. But the real star here is the croissants, which come with pure butter or stuffed with herbed goat cheese and leeks, with a focus on purely Oregonian creations on the sweet side, including one with raspberry and rose and another with seasonal fruits (pray for marionberry) hit with hazelnut cream. It’s almost enough to make you all but forget about the pizza. Almost.

Liliha Bakery

Liliha Bakery

Honolulu, Hawaii

For nearly 70 years, Liliha has served a very, very specific need in Honolulu: a 24-hour diner/bakery where you can get a delicious Portuguese scramble or some loco moco any time. But this isn’t a list about the best loco moco. Luckily, the bakery side of that weird equation is equally outstanding, made legend by Liliha’s famous Cocoa Puffs, which are more or less pudding-filled profiteroles, an innovation that has led to versions stuffed with green tea and chocolate cream. Malasadas, too, are legend, while the cupcake selection runs the gamut from banana Chantilly to guava. Grab a Banana Boat and a crumpet and kick back. It’s 4am. You’re in Hawaii. Life is good.

Macrina Bakery

Seattle, Washington

Macrina is named after an ancient Greek lady, but you don't have to be a dusty classics professor to appreciate this place. Although the staff would be happy to make you a wedding cake, Macrina's has built its name on simple, superb breads. Seriously, there's a whole bread menu. For purists, there's plenty of brioche, ciabatta, and rye to go around. But for those who just LOVE fall, go with the whole wheat cider. Oh, and there are wonderful cakes and pastries (get the Italian plum roll or the orange hazelnut pinwheel), too. Because a person can’t live on bread alone.

Muddy's Bake Shop

Memphis, Tennessee

Mud stopped being tasty once you turned 6, but Muddy's is bound to hook you in one visit. The famed Prozac cupcakes will make you question whether they snuck medication into the chocolate batter, while the Nancy's Boy Pie is perfect for anyone who likes to mainline coconut. It's also got an impressive vegan menu for dairy-shunning folks, and an appreciation of Douglas Adams, which is an important quality in any bakery.

Poupart's Bakery

Lafayette, Louisiana

In 1965, Monsieur Poupart left his pastry chef gig in Paris to settle in Louisiana with his wife. He quickly delighted locals with his fresh breads, quiches, and sweet treats. More than 50 years later, his shop still brags about being the "only authentic French bakery in Acadiana." He's made one important concession to his new home state, though -- in addition to making traditional French king cakes every February, Poupart's also churns out a "Mardi Gras king cake" packaged with beads and the all-important fake baby.

Proof Bakery

Los Angeles, California

It takes some hardcore bakers to man Proof's temperamental, truck-sized oven, but owner/chef Na Young Ma doesn't employ any wusses. Since they took over the old Rollin' Pin Bake Shop space in Atwater Village in 2010, Ma and her team have become local favorites. The croissants are a huge draw, but if you only accept exotic baked goods with at least three dominant flavors, keep an eye out for the vanilla passionfruit cake. It’s best washed down with a slice of forage blanc cheesecake with an impeccable chocolate almond crust.

Salty Tart

Minneapolis, Minnesota

It can be hard to stand out when you're Stall 161 of a sprawling public market (or just in a building, if you live in St. Paul), but the line at Salty Tart proves this hasn't been an issue. Although Andrew Zimmern's repeated endorsements might have something to do with that, the place wouldn't have earned those without its famous coconut macarons or endlessly customizable cakes. Want a 10-inch carrot cake with seasonal fruit compote filling, and "whatever-you-think-of" buttercream? Order away, you fascinating weirdo!

Jesse David Green

Sister Pie

Detroit, Michigan

A pie is only as good as its crust. It’s an old adage that this West Village newcomer takes to heart, and the buttery, flaky crusts here are more than simply a vessel: They’re kind of the star. You could fill them with a bunch of old pennies and still have something delicious. Luckily, they don’t do that very weird thing. They fill them with salted maple in one standout option on a roster that includes a transcendent honey lemon meringue, sweet beets, and whatever else comes to the chefs’ minds. Grab some cookies, too -- the fennel-seed snickerdoodle is a beast -- and some meaty hand-pies, the ingredients for which are obsessively sourced from local farms.

Standard Baking Co.

Standard Baking Co.

Portland, Maine

A current semifinalist for the James Beard Outstanding Baker Award, Standard’s being pretty humble with its name. So let us brag for mastermind Alison Pray: Standard Baking Co.’s breads are among the greatest loaves in the northeast. The roster changes up based on the locally sourced ingredients available, and generally includes baguettes, boules, focaccia, and pane Francese that would make even the most ardent paleo dieter salivate, with offerings like raisin pecan and a stellar five-grain loaf representing the stuff of yeasty dreams. Rolls, too, put the greatest hits in miniature, and will forever render all other sandwich breads disappointing. Don’t sleep on the almond galettes, either, and be sure to roll in at 1:30pm on any given day to get cookies fresh out of the oven, as God intended.

Olivia Rae James

Sugar Bakeshop

Charleston, South Carolina

Sure, you could just close your eyes, point a finger at the menu, and be confident in whatever baked good you just selected off the Sugar Bakeshop menu, but A) pointing at strangers is rude, and B) the place has too many good local delicacies to pass up. Consider a classic Southern chocolate bourbon pecan pie, a Hummingbird cake (spice cake with pineapple, bananas, and pecans), or a Lady Baltimore cake, which deceptively has zero ties to Maryland. It actually originated in Charleston's Lady Baltimore Tea Room, and comes with a generous supply of walnuts soaked in sherry.

Eric Wolfinger

Tartine Bakery

San Francisco, California

Want to know how good the bread is at Tartine? The shop offers pre-orders with three days' notice and cash upfront, because once they release the daily batch at 4:30pm, by 4:35pm it, like Kanye, is gone. Only a precious, ruthless few successfully beat that bread rush, but lucky for you, opting for a banana cream tart instead is hardly settling. Also fortunate, some of that bread is reserved for the jambon royale & Gruyere, one of the best sandwiches in sandwich-rich San Francisco.

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