Cars

Porsche's Cayman GT4 Is Here. Hope You Know How To Drive Stick.

Published On 02/03/2015 Published On 02/03/2015
Porsche's Cayman GT4
Porsche

If you're a Porsche fan, you've no doubt heard the countless conspiracy theories that the engineers had to be careful with the Cayman to not make it faster than the 911. Meet the Cayman GT4. The little 385 hp corner-carver is what happens when you combine the best of the Cayman, and the best of the 911.

The fact that it's coming in at sub $85,000? That's just icing on the cake.

Sure, it's utterly gorgeous in blue, and the carbon brakes go well with the GT4's beefed up side air inlets and front and rear aero bits, but that's just skin deep, and this car's beauty runs far deeper than that.

Porsche

In back, it's sporting the flat-six from the 911 Carrera S, albeit in a slightly detuned form. That means there are 385 hp to help the car dig itself out of corners.

Porsche

And of course, corners are precisely the natural habitat of the GT4. The extra downforce from the body combines with a 30 mm lower ride height and more than a few technical bits derived from the 911 GT3 for some truly ethereal performance. And by a few technical bits, Porsche means almost every aspect of the 911 GT3's suspension and brakes.

Porsche

There's no official word from Porsche as to whether that includes the GT3's rear wheel steering, but there's also little chance that matters much. One of Porsche's drivers managed to get it around the Nurburgring in exactly the same time as the old 911 GT3.

Not bad for an "entry level" chassis.

If you're thinking this is essentially a 911 GT3 in a Cayman body your'e not entirely off base, but it's also more than that. You can order it with hard-back carbon fiber seats, and it has an app specifically designed to help you improve your driving on track.

Porsche

The car hits 60 mph in 4.2 seconds and tops out at 183 mph, but it's really all about what you do in-between those speeds.

And yeah—it's only available with a manual transmission, so you'll never have to wrestle with the clutch vs paddle shifter dilemma.


Aaron Miller is the Rides editor for Supercompressor, and can be found on Twitter. He can't wait to take this one out.

Clickbait

close

Learn More