Cars

How to Take Baller Photos of Your Piece of Sh*t Car

Published On 09/01/2015 Published On 09/01/2015

Say you've got a car that's not exactly turning heads or bringing home any trophies. Whether you’re trying to get this hunk of metal sold on Craigslist ASAP, or you’re just proud as hell of your jalopy, it’s going to take some extra special finesse to make your car look good on camera. 

To find out how to get the best possible shots of the worst cars on the road, I checked in with Jamey Price, who makes his living traveling the world and shooting some of the world's preeminent motorsport events.

Courtesy of Jamey Price Photography

Here's an example of the caliber of Jamey's work. He's one of the absolute best in the business. He had some pretty sound advice for car photography that anyone can use, so keep these tips in mind the next time you'd like to take a shot of your ride.

(The rest of the photos in this article aren't Jamey's -- they simply illustrate his points beautifully.)

Flickr/Jesper2CV

1. Background is everything

Jamey’s tip: "Background is the most important part of shooting a car. Even if it's a Lamborghini Huracán in the photo, that does not make it good. Do everything in your power to get the car by itself [without other cars] and nothing in the background that would be overly distracting."

Flickr/Ian Sanderson

2. Make the car part of a larger story

Jamey’s tip: "I see so many photos of cars just sitting in a parking lot. Instead, shoot the car so that you tell a story about where it is, where it's going, and what's going on around it. Sometimes that story is more dramatic and effective than the car itself."

Wikimedia/TheBandit82089

3. Use your flash for contrast

Jamey’s tip: "In many cases, the use of a camera flash can help highlight the car and separate it from the background."

Flickr/Michael Gil

4. Pose the car to show off its finest attributes

Jamey’s tip: "When I shoot a car for an auction house, we have a very specific set of things we do when photographing it. Windows up, wheel turned away to show more of the profile of the rim. If it’s a convertible, [I] shoot it with the top up first. Then again with the top down and windows down."

Flickr/Mahdi Abdulrazak

5. Use natural light

Jamey’s tip: “Cars are designed to be beautiful and in my eye, natural light shows off their curves and beauty the best.”

Flickr/Paul Gorbould

6. Shoot as many angles as possible to find the best one

Jamey’s tip: "The angle you shoot from is different for each car. It’s always best to get every angle (front, side, rear, front 3/4, rear 3/4). But the light, background, and foreground all play a role in determining how you should photograph the car."

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