Cars

The New Koenigsegg Is Both The Fastest And Most Advanced Car Ever

Since its inception 20 years ago, Koenigsegg has never produced a slow car: 200 mph is child's play to the Swedish hypercar maker, and even 250 mph is yesterday's news. It's unsurprising, then, that they weren't willing to sit around playing possum in the aftermath of Hennessey's 270 mph run last month. Nordic climes notwithstanding, they've just unleashed undoubtedly the hottest Swede of all time, the One:1. It's the fastest car in the world, and that might not be the most impressive thing about it.

The name One:1 is derived from the power to weight ratio; officially, it's the first production car ever with one megawatt of horsepower, which both equates to 1340 hp, and is evidently a thing. That 1340 number also just happens to equal the car's weight in kilograms. To keep it so light, Koenigsegg went through the car with a fine-toothed comb, and even 3D printed the titanium turbo housing and exhaust tips because it saved 14 ounces.

Both because losing control of your car at 273 mph isn't generally something you get a second chance at, and because, shockingly, the car is actually built as a track killer rather than a high-speed monster, it actively reads the windspeed and adjusts a series of vents, flaps, and wings at both the front and the back to maximize stability and prevent the car from literally taking flight.

As if the active aero isn't enough, the One:1 uses real-time GPS data to anticipate when you'll need to turn and adjust the suspension and downforce levels accordingly.

Inside? Carbon fiber seats lined with memory foam keep you locked in place, and there's even an optional seat with noise-cancelling speakers built in, in case you happen to notice there's a lot of wind noise when you're driving faster than a Cessna.

Every single one has been sold already, so hopefully someone uses it as Koenigsegg intended, and these things can be seen in their natural element.

Aaron Miller is the Rides editor for Supercompressor. He'll never afford a Koenigsegg, but he promises to take good care of one if he can borrow it for a few hours. If you want to keep tabs on his fruitless quest for supercar ownership, follow him on Twitter.