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  • 01
    Fermentin' in a warehouse space in the arts district downtown, Greenbar Collective is the first LA-based distillery since Prohibition, back when men were men and women were also kinda men (have you seen those Prohibition posters??). Making the world's largest selection of organic, artisan, non-ghost spirits, Greenbar's got a portfolio that includes tequila distilled using old-school steaming techniques, and rum that's oxygenated with the same process as California wine. The crown jewel, though, is a white whiskey dubbed Slow Hand, which not only steals Gary Payton's new nickname at the Y, but also ferments a traditional mash (oat, malt, spelt) with ale and champagne yeasts, and then ages it in wooden barrels for just 10mins so that they can legally call it whiskey, instead of moonshine. Greenbar's alchi is available now at some of LA's best bars (Bar 1200 at the Sunset Marquis, River Rock, etc) or for home consumption at liquor depots like Bar Keeper. Oh, and they also open up the distillery once a month for cocktail classes in their small tasting room, which thankfully'll only cost you a single, roaring $20.
    More on White whiskey, made in DTLA for the first time in 90yrs
    • About

      Fermentin' in a warehouse space in the arts district downtown, Greenbar Collective is the first LA-based distillery since Prohibition, back when men were men and women were also kinda men (have you seen those Prohibition posters??). Making the world's largest selection of organic, artisan, non-ghost spirits, Greenbar's got a portfolio that includes tequila distilled using old-school steaming techniques, and rum that's oxygenated with the same process as California wine. The crown jewel, though, is a white whiskey dubbed Slow Hand, which not only steals Gary Payton's new nickname at the Y, but also ferments a traditional mash (oat, malt, spelt) with ale and champagne yeasts, and then ages it in wooden barrels for just 10mins so that they can legally call it whiskey, instead of moonshine. Greenbar's alchi is available now at some of LA's best bars (Bar 1200 at the Sunset Marquis, River Rock, etc) or for home consumption at liquor depots like Bar Keeper. Oh, and they also open up the distillery once a month for cocktail classes in their small tasting room, which thankfully'll only cost you a single, roaring $20.
    • Venue Info

  • 02
    Named for what the "dries" (currently known as "d*cks") called Prohibition, The Noble Experiment's a one-woman tasting room and stillhouse in Bushwick hoping to bring small batch distilling back to NYC -- luckily they've got sexy tufted metal tanks and piping, and are using plenty of locally sourced ingredients to lend each batch an inherently NY flavor. You can be an inherently NY drinker in their handsome tasting room decked with old-school floor-to-ceiling windows, a bar loaded with mad Zima their product, and a mish-mash of antiquey things to sit on. They've got plans for barrel-aged numbers, whiskeys, and more, but to kick things off they're working with Owney's NYC Rum, a very smooth, dry, white rum that's meant for sipping, and is their first effort to bring "native rum" back to NYC, which has been a challenge ever since the Brits passed that damn Molasses Act of 1733, which limited rum production and forced a shift to bourbon, something that has led to all sorts of ignoble experiments. Photo Credit: Paul Wagtouicz
    More on A distillery and tasting room in Brooklyn
    • About

      Named for what the "dries" (currently known as "d*cks") called Prohibition, The Noble Experiment's a one-woman tasting room and stillhouse in Bushwick hoping to bring small batch distilling back to NYC -- luckily they've got sexy tufted metal tanks and piping, and are using plenty of locally sourced ingredients to lend each batch an inherently NY flavor. You can be an inherently NY drinker in their handsome tasting room decked with old-school floor-to-ceiling windows, a bar loaded with mad Zima their product, and a mish-mash of antiquey things to sit on. They've got plans for barrel-aged numbers, whiskeys, and more, but to kick things off they're working with Owney's NYC Rum, a very smooth, dry, white rum that's meant for sipping, and is their first effort to bring "native rum" back to NYC, which has been a challenge ever since the Brits passed that damn Molasses Act of 1733, which limited rum production and forced a shift to bourbon, something that has led to all sorts of ignoble experiments. Photo Credit: Paul Wagtouicz
    • Venue Info

  • 03
    Green Hat -- DC's newest (... and only) gin distillery -- is taking a page out of Huck Finn's book, essentially asking you to paint their fence in the most fun possible way: by signing up to spend your Saturday "volunteering" in their small batch distillery, in the process becoming one of the few to see inside/drink inside their walls

    The name's an ode to "The Man with the Green Hat" (way less cool actual name: George Cassidy), who served as Congress's go-to bootlegger, and the place looks fittingly old school: fermentors and copper pot stills in a 90yr old warehouse. Email them here, and you and 5-10 of your besties could become a "bottling party": the first part is all learning, as they take you through creating a mash via temp-controlled fermentation, vaporization, and the all-important adding of botanicals (in this case: juniper, coriander, and citrus), which'll become instantly more interesting to you at the next step, tasting ("an herbal whisper of celery"! A "rewarding complexity"!). Then they'll sit you all down at a large table to earn your keep booze: each person is one part of the assembly line as you guys pour, cork, scribble batch & proof numbers, and attach labels, but not "boozehound", as you've already dibsed that one by spending your Saturday at a gin distillery

    And on the off chance that you don't have two hours of free Saturday, you can nab bottles of Green Hat at Schneider’s of Capitol Hill, Batch 13, and A.M. Wine Shoppe. Try it once, and there's no way you'll be on the fence.
    More on Get ready to embark on an epic gin-ey
    • About

      Green Hat -- DC's newest (... and only) gin distillery -- is taking a page out of Huck Finn's book, essentially asking you to paint their fence in the most fun possible way: by signing up to spend your Saturday "volunteering" in their small batch distillery, in the process becoming one of the few to see inside/drink inside their walls

      The name's an ode to "The Man with the Green Hat" (way less cool actual name: George Cassidy), who served as Congress's go-to bootlegger, and the place looks fittingly old school: fermentors and copper pot stills in a 90yr old warehouse. Email them here, and you and 5-10 of your besties could become a "bottling party": the first part is all learning, as they take you through creating a mash via temp-controlled fermentation, vaporization, and the all-important adding of botanicals (in this case: juniper, coriander, and citrus), which'll become instantly more interesting to you at the next step, tasting ("an herbal whisper of celery"! A "rewarding complexity"!). Then they'll sit you all down at a large table to earn your keep booze: each person is one part of the assembly line as you guys pour, cork, scribble batch & proof numbers, and attach labels, but not "boozehound", as you've already dibsed that one by spending your Saturday at a gin distillery

      And on the off chance that you don't have two hours of free Saturday, you can nab bottles of Green Hat at Schneider’s of Capitol Hill, Batch 13, and A.M. Wine Shoppe. Try it once, and there's no way you'll be on the fence.
    • Venue Info

  • 04
    Back in the Spring, you probably caught wind of two area cousins (one an MBA, one a Chemistry PhD) who harnessed a "love of spirits" to turn a former 19th-century iron foundry into a small-batch craft distillery peddling handmade bottles of American gin. At the time, they promised you'd eventually get invited over for a drink once the tasting room opened. Well, now that pup is as open as the Red Sox players are about how much they hate Bobby Valentine. And seeing how it's always prudent to ask questions before venturing to Southie, consider some of your more pressing ones addressed here

    An old iron foundry, eh? Yep, although now you'll stroll past the official GT logo'd '66 Ford F100 en route to check out the oak barrels & massive copper still, before settling into the painted brick/ tiled tasting room complete with a concrete bar made of rough-cut pine barnboard and a single church pew bench, so you better pray you get a seat. Unless you're Agnostic.

    I'm actually Irish Catholic. Which leads to my next question: what are we drinking? In addition to their smooth like Billy Dee Williams 90-proof Wire Works American Gin (described as "non-piney"), you'll also get to try their recently unveiled limited-run (only 100 bottles!) hickory-smoked, pepper-flavored Fire Puncher Vodka, which's made by blowing smoke into macerated chipotle peppers and is billed as "Not for the Faint at Heart", and also "Not for the people who faint at Heart concerts".

    Right, but say I prefer something with almonds? That's a crazy coincidence as they've currently got three flavored cordials (almond (!!!!), Angelica root/cinnamon, cranberry) in the works for later in the year, which'll be closely followed by their oak barrel-aged Medford Rum and Applejack, though unlike the Sox, that's more of a wildcard.
    More on Tours and tastings, now live
    • About

      Back in the Spring, you probably caught wind of two area cousins (one an MBA, one a Chemistry PhD) who harnessed a "love of spirits" to turn a former 19th-century iron foundry into a small-batch craft distillery peddling handmade bottles of American gin. At the time, they promised you'd eventually get invited over for a drink once the tasting room opened. Well, now that pup is as open as the Red Sox players are about how much they hate Bobby Valentine. And seeing how it's always prudent to ask questions before venturing to Southie, consider some of your more pressing ones addressed here

      An old iron foundry, eh? Yep, although now you'll stroll past the official GT logo'd '66 Ford F100 en route to check out the oak barrels & massive copper still, before settling into the painted brick/ tiled tasting room complete with a concrete bar made of rough-cut pine barnboard and a single church pew bench, so you better pray you get a seat. Unless you're Agnostic.

      I'm actually Irish Catholic. Which leads to my next question: what are we drinking? In addition to their smooth like Billy Dee Williams 90-proof Wire Works American Gin (described as "non-piney"), you'll also get to try their recently unveiled limited-run (only 100 bottles!) hickory-smoked, pepper-flavored Fire Puncher Vodka, which's made by blowing smoke into macerated chipotle peppers and is billed as "Not for the Faint at Heart", and also "Not for the people who faint at Heart concerts".

      Right, but say I prefer something with almonds? That's a crazy coincidence as they've currently got three flavored cordials (almond (!!!!), Angelica root/cinnamon, cranberry) in the works for later in the year, which'll be closely followed by their oak barrel-aged Medford Rum and Applejack, though unlike the Sox, that's more of a wildcard.
    • Venue Info

  • 05
    This Fort Worth distiller crafts two varieties of hooch in its Prohibition-era warehouse: TX Blended Whiskey aged in both new and old oak barrels to give it notes of pear as well as vanilla, and Straight Bourbon that ages 4x faster than it would in Scotland thanks either to the TX heat, or, our freeeeeeddddooooom!!!
    More on Fort Worth Whiskey, Now In Austin
    • About

      This Fort Worth distiller crafts two varieties of hooch in its Prohibition-era warehouse: TX Blended Whiskey aged in both new and old oak barrels to give it notes of pear as well as vanilla, and Straight Bourbon that ages 4x faster than it would in Scotland thanks either to the TX heat, or, our freeeeeeddddooooom!!!
    • Venue Info

  • 06
    Quick -- what are you doing next Sunday? Ok, that pause was long enough to indicate you have no set plans, so basically now you have to go on the Lincoln's field trip to Catoctin Creek Distillery unless you want things to get super awkward. They'll bus you out there for a whiskey-fueled trip, during which their exec chef'll stuff you with everything from grilled rainbow trout to "drunken flank steak", which's fairly redundant given the setting

    What is Catoctin Creek Distillery, you ask? Well, it's Purceville, VA's fledging operation that's basically unpronounceable even before you start drinking their small batch whiskey, gin, brandy, and liqueurs.

    The husband & wife team behind it have chemical engineering & IT backgrounds, so the facility's got a bunch of high-tech features, but for drankin' purposes, the most important is a custom-made distillation column, which adds "aroma and flavor" to creations like Watershed Gin (w/ subtle citrus and cinnamon notes), 1757 Virginia Brandy (made with local VA grapes), and Mosby's Spirit white whiskey, otherwise known as "gentleman's moonshine", so remember to hold the door for ladies after doing body shots off of their navels. 30-minute tours run every day starting at 11a or 12p, and'll take you through the entire spirit-production process (previously only explained in Bring It On), from fermentation, to distillation, to aging and bottling, all complete with insider insights like why unhammered copper guarantees the high quality and the most aromatic distillates, and other stuff you might actually remember

    Those regular tours are just $5, by the way, and include three pours of their best stuff, after which you'll ask "what's it going to take to get some more Cactocin Creek Distillery spirits?"

    Photos by Sarah Hauser
    More on The low-down on Loudoun's spirits
    • About

      Quick -- what are you doing next Sunday? Ok, that pause was long enough to indicate you have no set plans, so basically now you have to go on the Lincoln's field trip to Catoctin Creek Distillery unless you want things to get super awkward. They'll bus you out there for a whiskey-fueled trip, during which their exec chef'll stuff you with everything from grilled rainbow trout to "drunken flank steak", which's fairly redundant given the setting

      What is Catoctin Creek Distillery, you ask? Well, it's Purceville, VA's fledging operation that's basically unpronounceable even before you start drinking their small batch whiskey, gin, brandy, and liqueurs.

      The husband & wife team behind it have chemical engineering & IT backgrounds, so the facility's got a bunch of high-tech features, but for drankin' purposes, the most important is a custom-made distillation column, which adds "aroma and flavor" to creations like Watershed Gin (w/ subtle citrus and cinnamon notes), 1757 Virginia Brandy (made with local VA grapes), and Mosby's Spirit white whiskey, otherwise known as "gentleman's moonshine", so remember to hold the door for ladies after doing body shots off of their navels. 30-minute tours run every day starting at 11a or 12p, and'll take you through the entire spirit-production process (previously only explained in Bring It On), from fermentation, to distillation, to aging and bottling, all complete with insider insights like why unhammered copper guarantees the high quality and the most aromatic distillates, and other stuff you might actually remember

      Those regular tours are just $5, by the way, and include three pours of their best stuff, after which you'll ask "what's it going to take to get some more Cactocin Creek Distillery spirits?"

      Photos by Sarah Hauser
    • Venue Info

  • 07
    In this consumer society, you typically enjoy things far from where they were created, which can lead to a certain disconnect, though you probably wouldn't enjoy having little Bobby around Flashdancers anyways. At least you can enjoy some hooch right where it's made, thanks to The Shanty at New York Distilling Co

    With a team that includes a Brooklyn Brewery co-founder, a Manhattan Cocktail Classic board member who's one of "the nation's leading experts on distilled spirits and cocktails", and a Pegu Club 'tender, the brick-walled Shanty classes up consumption via a large white-oak-and-steel bar, an antique still, and a window overlooking the fully operational distillery's "beautiful, brand-new Christian CARL still", weird, because that sweatpants-loving dude seems way more into Jersey than Jesus. That distillery currently produces two gins: Perry's Tot Navy Strength, whose 57% ABV is the proof at which gunpowder could still fire "should it be soaked by spilled spirit", and the robustly botanical'd Dorothy Parker American, an homage to a woman they view as the ideal drinking companion, so apparently they dig drinking alone in a hotel with a tiny dog. In addition to 'tails made from their own spirits (The Opera: Perry's Tot, Dubonnet Rouge, maraschino liqueur, orange bitters), the full bar will be loaded with American whiskeys to be used in the likes of the triple sec & Madeira "Rye Cove", right at home on the rocks

    Eventually there'll also be tours of the space, and new liquors including Old Tom-style gin, and an American rye they're currently waiting to "appropriately age", so, much like little Bobby, it has some maturing to do before it's ready to MAAAKE SOME NOOOIIISSSE!
    More on A bar in a distillery
    • About

      In this consumer society, you typically enjoy things far from where they were created, which can lead to a certain disconnect, though you probably wouldn't enjoy having little Bobby around Flashdancers anyways. At least you can enjoy some hooch right where it's made, thanks to The Shanty at New York Distilling Co

      With a team that includes a Brooklyn Brewery co-founder, a Manhattan Cocktail Classic board member who's one of "the nation's leading experts on distilled spirits and cocktails", and a Pegu Club 'tender, the brick-walled Shanty classes up consumption via a large white-oak-and-steel bar, an antique still, and a window overlooking the fully operational distillery's "beautiful, brand-new Christian CARL still", weird, because that sweatpants-loving dude seems way more into Jersey than Jesus. That distillery currently produces two gins: Perry's Tot Navy Strength, whose 57% ABV is the proof at which gunpowder could still fire "should it be soaked by spilled spirit", and the robustly botanical'd Dorothy Parker American, an homage to a woman they view as the ideal drinking companion, so apparently they dig drinking alone in a hotel with a tiny dog. In addition to 'tails made from their own spirits (The Opera: Perry's Tot, Dubonnet Rouge, maraschino liqueur, orange bitters), the full bar will be loaded with American whiskeys to be used in the likes of the triple sec & Madeira "Rye Cove", right at home on the rocks

      Eventually there'll also be tours of the space, and new liquors including Old Tom-style gin, and an American rye they're currently waiting to "appropriately age", so, much like little Bobby, it has some maturing to do before it's ready to MAAAKE SOME NOOOIIISSSE!
    • Venue Info

  • 08
    After years presumably thinking the old bible passage was about never making a profit in your own country, the Seattle-based fisherman/carpenter behind the previously-only-available-in-Asia Fremont Mischief whiskey (and other spirits) is finally slinging the stuff stateside from a new Ship Canal-side distillery, complete with a tiny, hand-built retail shop and tasting room, where sorry Matthew, 13 isn't old enough to get a taste. Get a peek at the:

    Whiskey: Produced in an elaborate custom-designed/made copper still, FM's three 100% rye grain hooch offerings include the subtly vanilla/caramel-flavored John Jacob, produced using a Jingleheimer Schmidt pre-prohibition recipe developed by the owner's great-grandfather; the smoother eponymous version that's been aged for eight years, and also a Commemorative Soldier Whiskey that comes with a dog tag featuring the name of a wounded or fallen soldier and the war they fought in.

    Not-Whiskey: FM also turns out a refreshingly sip-able gin produced with fresh local botanicals, and a soft full-bodied vodka made with winter wheat that, like all their grains, is sourced from local organic producers and gives this particular swill a subtle flavor they've refused to destroy with over-filtration and chill-stabilization, two popular practices against which they were clearly starting to chaff.

    Other Stuff: The awesomely riotous tasting room is decked with dozens of pinup-style photographs, and packed with vintage storage chests/shelves stocked with everything from barware, to CDs from their in-house record company, and a mess of Mischief-inspired graphic tees about which, because they aren't made by hand, they tell the Parable Of The Sewer... Somewhere Who Needs a Job.
    More on A local whiskey that's now available locally
    • About

      After years presumably thinking the old bible passage was about never making a profit in your own country, the Seattle-based fisherman/carpenter behind the previously-only-available-in-Asia Fremont Mischief whiskey (and other spirits) is finally slinging the stuff stateside from a new Ship Canal-side distillery, complete with a tiny, hand-built retail shop and tasting room, where sorry Matthew, 13 isn't old enough to get a taste. Get a peek at the:

      Whiskey: Produced in an elaborate custom-designed/made copper still, FM's three 100% rye grain hooch offerings include the subtly vanilla/caramel-flavored John Jacob, produced using a Jingleheimer Schmidt pre-prohibition recipe developed by the owner's great-grandfather; the smoother eponymous version that's been aged for eight years, and also a Commemorative Soldier Whiskey that comes with a dog tag featuring the name of a wounded or fallen soldier and the war they fought in.

      Not-Whiskey: FM also turns out a refreshingly sip-able gin produced with fresh local botanicals, and a soft full-bodied vodka made with winter wheat that, like all their grains, is sourced from local organic producers and gives this particular swill a subtle flavor they've refused to destroy with over-filtration and chill-stabilization, two popular practices against which they were clearly starting to chaff.

      Other Stuff: The awesomely riotous tasting room is decked with dozens of pinup-style photographs, and packed with vintage storage chests/shelves stocked with everything from barware, to CDs from their in-house record company, and a mess of Mischief-inspired graphic tees about which, because they aren't made by hand, they tell the Parable Of The Sewer... Somewhere Who Needs a Job.
    • Venue Info

  • 09
    Excessive reliance on imports can ruin your economy, an idea that's all Greek to Greece. Now making in Texas what Texans consume most, Garrison Brothers Distillery

    A homegrown Hill Country operation from a former GSD&M-er, Garrison has proudly crafted TX's first bourbon, strictly following our national spirit's standards (distilling sub-160 proof, barreling sub-120 proof, 51% corn, maturing in white American oak), while dispelling the myth that the stuff must be Kentucky-made the same way Champagne must come from Champagne, and Wild Irish Rose must come from C-Mart. The raw materials: 200ac of organic grain grown on-site, corn from the Panhandle, Pac-NW barley, and limestone-heavy groundwater tested to meet Bourbon County specs by Maker's and Buffalo Trace reps, all combining in the barrel to create a long velvety finish and a complex flavor profile dominated by smoked butterscotch, which fortunately tastes nothing like the butterscotch Kids' Telly smoked. Although they've been quietly distilling for a bit (under the pre-release name Young Gun), they've now expanded capacity (up to 5000gal of mash a day), and've just begun visitor programs: the quick "Whiskey Road Trip" (walk-through + tasting), the more intensive "Sit and Sip" (tastes at various stages of distilling), and, promising a full-on education + a take-home barrel, a package called "Old 300" -- also the pre-green-screen-era version of the movie, which basically involved naked guys running around fighting no one

    Finding a bottle of Garrison on the shelves is rare, so your best bets beside the distillery are hooch-houses like tenOak and Trifecta on 3rd -- where you can wreck your economy, throw up your hands, and say you can't pay, and hope someone bails you out in the morning.
    More on Kentucky's spirit arrives in TX
    • About

      Excessive reliance on imports can ruin your economy, an idea that's all Greek to Greece. Now making in Texas what Texans consume most, Garrison Brothers Distillery

      A homegrown Hill Country operation from a former GSD&M-er, Garrison has proudly crafted TX's first bourbon, strictly following our national spirit's standards (distilling sub-160 proof, barreling sub-120 proof, 51% corn, maturing in white American oak), while dispelling the myth that the stuff must be Kentucky-made the same way Champagne must come from Champagne, and Wild Irish Rose must come from C-Mart. The raw materials: 200ac of organic grain grown on-site, corn from the Panhandle, Pac-NW barley, and limestone-heavy groundwater tested to meet Bourbon County specs by Maker's and Buffalo Trace reps, all combining in the barrel to create a long velvety finish and a complex flavor profile dominated by smoked butterscotch, which fortunately tastes nothing like the butterscotch Kids' Telly smoked. Although they've been quietly distilling for a bit (under the pre-release name Young Gun), they've now expanded capacity (up to 5000gal of mash a day), and've just begun visitor programs: the quick "Whiskey Road Trip" (walk-through + tasting), the more intensive "Sit and Sip" (tastes at various stages of distilling), and, promising a full-on education + a take-home barrel, a package called "Old 300" -- also the pre-green-screen-era version of the movie, which basically involved naked guys running around fighting no one

      Finding a bottle of Garrison on the shelves is rare, so your best bets beside the distillery are hooch-houses like tenOak and Trifecta on 3rd -- where you can wreck your economy, throw up your hands, and say you can't pay, and hope someone bails you out in the morning.
    • Venue Info

  • 10
    It's cool to be the first in history to accomplish something, unless, or course, it's followed by an asterisk or "while being eaten alive by rats". The first Seattle bar in history to distill and sell its own liquor*, Sun Liquor Distillery, now open.

    Nine blocks from the original Sun spot, this mostly handbuilt 65-seater's serving seasonally inspired handcrafted 'tails that'll eventually include their housemade gin which, after getting the recipe right, they'll have to buy back from the state at a markup (insert government rant!); inside the high-ceiling'd space (rife with vintage details like a repurposed 1950s fridge and a trophy case packed with antique badminton gear) is cleaved by a three-sided polished birch bar separating a glass-fronted production area equipped with an alembic-style copper test still, and the main swilling area which's walled on one side with a giant world map that's probably not quite as Majestic as the Mapp they had at UVa. The straightforward menu includes eight specialty 'tails ranging from the rye/ Maraschino/ punta mes/ orange twist Red Hook; to the Southside w/ gin, fresh mint, lemon & ginger beer; to the dark rum-based Libbey's Mai Tai w/ housemade grenadine; and the Aperol/ grapefruit/ Champagne Magnolia, which is much better if you get it sans the raining frogs. SLD's got one beer on tap (Fremont), plus red or white sangria made to order with brandy and fresh squeezed juices, and a food menu that boasts only two things -- Shoestring Fries made from Washington potatoes, and a Sun Burger Basket that includes a Tillamook cheddar topped meat disc made from grass-fed beef, which is just one more reason Tupac and Biggie should have said no to drugs.

    In the future SLD hopes to make hard-to-get-in-the-Evergreen liquors and mixers, plans to let you sample/buy bottles of their hooch on-site, and to sling it in liquor stores across the country, which would be quite an accomplishment, unless it was followed by "of Turkmenistan".

    *the first legal establishment, anyway
    More on Handcrafted cocktails really made in-house
    • About

      It's cool to be the first in history to accomplish something, unless, or course, it's followed by an asterisk or "while being eaten alive by rats". The first Seattle bar in history to distill and sell its own liquor*, Sun Liquor Distillery, now open.

      Nine blocks from the original Sun spot, this mostly handbuilt 65-seater's serving seasonally inspired handcrafted 'tails that'll eventually include their housemade gin which, after getting the recipe right, they'll have to buy back from the state at a markup (insert government rant!); inside the high-ceiling'd space (rife with vintage details like a repurposed 1950s fridge and a trophy case packed with antique badminton gear) is cleaved by a three-sided polished birch bar separating a glass-fronted production area equipped with an alembic-style copper test still, and the main swilling area which's walled on one side with a giant world map that's probably not quite as Majestic as the Mapp they had at UVa. The straightforward menu includes eight specialty 'tails ranging from the rye/ Maraschino/ punta mes/ orange twist Red Hook; to the Southside w/ gin, fresh mint, lemon & ginger beer; to the dark rum-based Libbey's Mai Tai w/ housemade grenadine; and the Aperol/ grapefruit/ Champagne Magnolia, which is much better if you get it sans the raining frogs. SLD's got one beer on tap (Fremont), plus red or white sangria made to order with brandy and fresh squeezed juices, and a food menu that boasts only two things -- Shoestring Fries made from Washington potatoes, and a Sun Burger Basket that includes a Tillamook cheddar topped meat disc made from grass-fed beef, which is just one more reason Tupac and Biggie should have said no to drugs.

      In the future SLD hopes to make hard-to-get-in-the-Evergreen liquors and mixers, plans to let you sample/buy bottles of their hooch on-site, and to sling it in liquor stores across the country, which would be quite an accomplishment, unless it was followed by "of Turkmenistan".

      *the first legal establishment, anyway
    • Venue Info

  1. White whiskey, made in DTLA for the first time in 90yrs
  2. A distillery and tasting room in Brooklyn
  3. Get ready to embark on an epic gin-ey
  4. Tours and tastings, now live
  5. Fort Worth Whiskey, Now In Austin
  6. The low-down on Loudoun's spirits
  7. A bar in a distillery
  8. A local whiskey that's now available locally
  9. Kentucky's spirit arrives in TX
  10. Handcrafted cocktails really made in-house