From Classic to Classy, Here Are the Best Buffets in Las Vegas

How to do all-you-can-eat in post-pandemic Vegas.

Bacchanal Buffet
Bacchanal Buffet | Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment
Bacchanal Buffet | Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment

After overcoming the depths of the pandemic, everything is back to normal in Las Vegas. Well, almost everything. The closure of buffets in 2020 was the first sign COVID-19 was a problem that couldn't be solved with a sneeze guard. More than three years and a few vaccine shots later, Vegas is thriving again with pool parties, nightclubs, and other fun stuff, but the buffet scene looks quite a bit different.

Longtime favorites like Le Village Buffet at Paris, Carnival World & Seafood Buffet at the Rio, and Studio B at The M Resort never reopened. Meanwhile, Station Casinos decided it was done with the concept for good at its properties. Newer hotels aren't bothering at all, and some are embracing food halls instead, including Famous Food Street Eats at Resorts World and Proper Eats at the Aria, which happens to have a pretty cool speakeasy hidden behind the doughnut counter.

However, Las Vegas has always been a place where you can have your cake and eat it too. And sometimes go back for seconds, or maybe even thirds. So don't count out the buffet just yet. Its role has evolved from a loss leader to keep people inside casinos to a more expensive array of food in one place that's often considered a rite of passage or a bucket-list experience for tourists, although we can think of a few other things more worthy of that designation. So go ahead, come hungry, and see how Las Vegas buffets are continuing to not only survive but thrive with the following 15 options.

Bacchanal Buffet
Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment

Bacchanal Buffet

Caesars Palace
$$$$

Generally, the standard by which all Las Vegas buffets are judged, Bacchanal Buffet took advantage of the downtime during the early days of the pandemic and reopened in 2021 with an all-new look and selection. The space underwent a multimillion-dollar renovation and added dozens of new dishes, served from nine open kitchens. It's easy to see a greater array of Asian cuisine, such as black pepper beef or chicken tikka masala, and plant-based options. Try the spring veggies and lentil ragout currently available. A wood-fired grill serves up a nice prime rib and a few surprises, including a lamb T-bone with artichoke barigoule. The saffron butter braised lobster claws are nearly worth the price of admission alone. In late May, brunch expands to five days a week, Thursday through Monday, with crab served Friday through Sunday. That gives you additional opportunities to try the short rib benedict, seafood gumbo, and "Hog Heaven Waffler," a waffle slider with smoked pork belly, bacon, sausage, egg, cheese, and blueberry syrup.
Cost: Dinner is $74.99, brunch is $54.99.
How to order: Making a reservation is highly recommended and should be done well in advance if you're seeking a particular time slot.

Available for Reservations
Wicked Spoon
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

Wicked Spoon

The Cosmopolitan
$$$$

A Vegas buffet used to be about scooping as much food as possible on your plate, but Wicked Spoon turned that idea around when it first opened in 2010, offering a wider variety of food in smaller portions with the same quality you'd find in a nice restaurant. Today, you can work your way through intriguing bites like "angry" mac n' cheese, tamarind-glazed leg of lamb, Asian dirty rice, and a pizza topped with the same stuff you'd find in a Reuben sandwich (corned beef, sauerkraut, and special sauce). An in-house team of butchers is responsible for mouth-watering meatballs, prime rib, and bone marrow with short rib. It's important to know that Wicked Spoon is only open for breakfast and lunch (or brunch on the weekends), so plan accordingly. In addition to deals on bottomless mimosas, champagne, Bloody Marys, and Bud Light draft, Wicked Spoon has an all-you-can-drink craft cocktail option, including the vodka-fueled morning buzz, served in a Chinese takeout-style box.
Cost: Wicked Spoon is open for breakfast ($38 adults, $19 kids 5-10) and lunch ($45 adults, $22.50 kids 5-10) Monday-Friday and brunch ($49 adults, $24 kids 5-10) Saturday-Sunday. Bottomless booze packages are $24-$40 and have a two-hour limit.
How to book: Dining is walk-in only.

The Buffet at Bellagio
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

Things are picking back up at the Bellagio's buffet, which has traditionally been one of the most indulgent on the Strip. Dinner hours are expanding from just Fridays and Saturdays to five nights a week (Wednesday-Sunday) from late May to early September. Meanwhile, the buffet will continue to be open 8 am-3 pm daily with a focus on breakfast and lunch dishes. The Bellagio mixes things up with stations dedicated to ramen, tacos, crepes, gelato, and Japanese hand rolls with sushi, salmon poke, octopus salad, and other small bites. This may also be the only buffet in town to include Screwdrivers in its unlimited drink package, which also covers draft beer, house wines, mimosas, margaritas, and bloody marys. To be honest, the price is a little high for what you get, especially during dinner.
Cost: Prices are $44.99-74.99. Kids 6-11 get 50% off. The drink package is $24.99.
How to book: No reservations, but guests can skip the line with prepaid priority entry.

The Buffet at Wynn
The Buffet at Wynn | Photo by Douglas Friedman, courtesy of The Buffet at Wynn

The Buffet at Wynn

Wynn Las Vegas
$$$$

The Buffet at Wynn is easily one of the best buffets in Vegas (with only Caesars Palace and the Cosmopolitan as its main competition for the top spot). You already know it's going to be an experience with an entrance lined with eight royal palms and a lineup of food from 16 stations. Lobster benedicts and red velvet chocolate chip pancakes are among the top choices during breakfast and brunch, while a global array of cuisine is represented through lunch and dinner. Go Mexican with chicken mole and green chile tamales or try Italian with lasagna alla bolognese and potato gnocchi. A BBQ station serves pork and beef ribs, honey-glazed cornbread, and other Southern-style comfort food. Upgrade to an "Endless Pours" package with unlimited wine, beer, mimosas, or other select cocktails.
Cost: Brunch is $46.99-50.99, dinner is $65.99-70.99. "Endless Pours" upgrade is $29.99.
How to book: Guests can secure a spot in line with prepaid priority seating.

Circus Buffet
Photo courtesy of Circus Buffet

Circus Buffet

Circus Circus
$$$$

Simple, efficient, no frills. The Circus Buffet was never fancy to begin with and was downsized in recent years to clear more space for a food court. Most of the food is standard buffet fare (sliced meats, fried chicken, pizza, omelets, etc.) but is less expensive than other buffets on the Strip with shorter wait times. Timing is tight. The Circus Buffet is open Friday-Sunday and is heavy on high school cafeteria vibes. If you're looking for something fancy at Circus Circus, try The Steakhouse instead, a long-running favorite among regulars with great food and old-school charm.
Cost: Adults are $32.99 for dinner and $30.99 for brunch. Kids (4-10) are $16.50 for dinner and $15.50 for brunch
How to book: Dining is walk-in only.

Garden Court Buffet
Photo courtesy of Garden Court Buffet

Garden Court Buffet

Main Street Station
$$$$

If you're craving calories on Fremont Street, this is the only consistent buffet in the Downtown tourist area. Located inside the Main Street Station casino, Garden Court has a beautiful dining room (especially for buffet standards) with arched illuminated ceilings, brick walls, trees, and Victorian-inspired decor. Stations serve a variety of dishes, ranging from Asian and Mexican to pizza and "country" (Southern-style comfort food) with a standard salad bar. Garden Court is open daily for brunch 8 am–2 pm, but only open for dinner (4–9 pm) on Fridays and Saturdays.
Cost: Brunch is $23.99-26.99, dinner is $32.99. Kids 4-10 are half-price. Higher-level Boyd Rewards members receive discounts.
Now to book: Dining is walk-in only.

Rampart Buffet
Photo courtesy of Market Place Buffet

Market Place Buffet

Rampart Casino
$$$$

Located in the Rampart Casino (connected to the JW Marriott), the Market Place Buffet is your main place for all-you-can-eat dining in the Summerlin area. It's also a rare buffet that offers patio seating, which is especially enticing when surrounded by the trees and landscaping of the hotel grounds. The selection is better than many Strip buffets with stations serving slow-roasted prime rib, fresh-baked brick-oven pizzas, and strong choices among Asian, Italian, and Mediterranean bites. Aloha Night runs every Saturday. Come Mondays for Deli Night with New York-style deli favorites. The weekend Champagne brunch includes bottomless champagne, which is worth the price all by itself. No matter when you visit, add on unlimited beer and wine for an additional $7.99.
Cost: Lunch is $16.99. Champagne brunch is $31.99. Dinner $16.99-30.99. Kids (12 and under) and casino rewards club members receive discounts.
How to book: Seating is first-come, first-served.

MGM Grand Buffet
Photo courtesy of MGM Grand Buffet

MGM Grand Buffet

MGM Grand
$$$$

The MGM Grand is one of the largest hotels in Las Vegas, but the buffet is on the smaller side compared to a few others on the Strip. Hours are limited to 8 am–3 pm, starting with breakfast items in the morning and cycling in lunch bites as the day progresses. Seafood options are slim, so stick with the lox and bagel, breakfast taquitos, and red velvet pancakes. A carving station serves the heartiest fare, including a 12-hour apricot-smoked beef brisket, peppercorn crusted beef-round, and rotisserie chicken. The hazelnut tart and pecan pie are top choices for dessert. The all-you-can-drink add-on includes deer, wine, and mimosas (plus cocktails with an upgrade).
Cost: $27.99 weekdays, $36.99 weekends (Friday-Sunday). Kids 5-11 $16.99-17.99. Drink packages are $21.99-25.99.
How to book: Reservations are available via Seven Rooms with a "speed pass" upcharge.

The Buffet at Luxor
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

If you want to have an all-you-can-eat brunch inside a giant pyramid, head straight to the Luxor. The resort's buffet is only open for brunch 8 am–3 pm Thursday-Monday, but still includes a long 30-foot salad bar, made-to-order omelets and egg benedicts, and a carving station for roast turkey, ham, and beef steamship. Regulars love the French Toast (with more than 1,000 pieces hand-made daily) and the all-beef Nathan's hot dogs. Sip on bottomless mimosas and bloody marys with an upcharge (and a 90-minute time limit).
Cost: $28.99-31.99 per person (with an additional $14.99 for the drinks package). Kids are $16.17.99.
How to book: Reservations are available for large parties of 10 or more. Otherwise, just walk in.

Not all buffets are in hotels. Founded by Japanese sushi chef Kaku Makino, Makino has a wide variety of sushi and seafood, including hand rolls made on the spot, fish filets, squid, and fried shrimp. Choose your own ingredients at the ramen station and save room for your choice of Asian-style desserts. The selection of premium items has been toned down a bit due to post-pandemic inflation. Most noticeably, crab legs are limited to one serving on weekends. Makino is just west of the Strip, south of Chinatown.
Cost: Lunch $26.95, dinner $39.95 (with discounts for kids and seniors 65 and older).
How to book: Call 702-889-4477 to make a reservation.

Garden Buffet

South Point
$$$$

Located in the off-Strip South Point casino near Silverado Ranch, the Garden Buffet remains competitive with more high-profile counterparts and continues to be a favorite of locals in search of a deal. Guests can explore a variety of cuisine between six live cooking stations, including a Mongolian grill. The weekday breakfast includes bottomless Bloody Marys, the weekend prime rib and champagne brunch includes bottomless mimosas, and Seafood Night Fridays include two glasses of wine, sangria, or draft beer to wash down crab legs, peel-and-eat shrimp, oysters on the half-shell, and more.
Cost: Breakfast $16.95, lunch $19.95, prime rib & champagne brunch $28.95, dinner $28.95 (Saturday-Thursday), and $49.95 ("Seafood Night" Friday).
How to book: Dining is walk-in only.

The Buffet at Excalibur
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

Early risers take note. The Buffet at Excalibur gets the jump on its competition, opening at 7 am seven days a week with a focus on brunch favorites until 2 pm. The dining room hasn't changed much over the years but remains a warm environment with a modern design and dark color tones. Aside from a savory posole (Mexican stew), the selection is about what you'd expect and not a bad deal for Strip prices. Made-to-order crepes and omelets draw the longest lines. The pizza selection changes daily. Smoked ribs and roasted chicken are served on weekends. The bottomless drink package covers draft beer, mimosas, and cocktails made with rum, vodka, or tequila.
Cost: Adults $28.99-31.99, kids $16.99-17.99. Add-on drink package $14.99.
How to book: Dining is walk-in only.

Galpao Gaucho Brazilian Steakhouse
Photo courtesy of Galpão Gaúcho

Galpão Gaúcho

The Strip
$$$$

You've got a few options for Brazilian steakhouses in Vegas, but Galpão Gaúcho is the newest and easily one of the best. The restaurant is on the Strip-facing east side of the Fashion Show mall with a reclusive white-tablecloth dining room that feels a world away from the chaos of tourists and shoppers. It's a great environment for an all-you-can-eat rodizio feast, with servers roaming the dining room with skewers of steak and seafood, slicing off pieces tableside while offering as much as your appetite can handle. Ribeye, salmon, lamb chops, chicken legs—it's all fair game. A few items (garlic mashed potatoes, spicy sauces, and fried plantains) are brought to the table, but most of the salads, sides, and soups are presented in a self-serve buffet. Desserts are priced separately. The bar has a nice Scotch collection and tempting cocktails, including barrel-aged Manhattans and Old Fashioneds.
Cost:
How to book: Call 702-602-0384 or make a reservation online.

A.Y.C.E. Buffet
Photo courtesy of A.Y.C.E. Buffet

The Palms faced an extended closure and change of ownership during the pandemic but is now back open with a few familiarities in place, including the A.Y.C.E Buffet – pronounced "ace" if you plan to say the name out loud. Food is served from six food stations, all against one wall, making it easy to navigate, with a centralized salad bar. The buffet serves dinner seven days a week and opens early at 2 pm on Wednesday for unlimited lobster night. Crack 'em open whole (along with crab legs), or do it the easy way with just the tail prepared for you. They're served in both the Hearth and Word Pan stations, which helps cut down on wait times. The dessert station gets backed up easily, however, thanks to parlor-style ice cream scooping. A.Y.C.E. is also busy for Crab Feast Thursdays, Prime Rib Fridays, and the weekend brunch, featuring bottomless champagne and mimosas.
Cost: Dinner is $36.99, $64.99 (Lobster Night), $58.99 (Crab Feast), or $42.99 (Prime Rib Fridays). Weekend brunch is $32.99. Kids (3-11) receive discounts.
How to book: There are no reservations, but A.Y.C.E. has an open-table texting waitlist during busy periods.

Naan & Curry
Photo by Sona Pabla, courtesy of Naan & Curry

Naan & Curry

Multiple locations
$$$$

Having a lunch buffet is standard operation for many of the best Indian restaurants in Las Vegas. However, fast-growing newcomer Naan & Curry has perfected the concept with locations in the Southwest, Henderson, and soon-to-come near Summerlin. The dining rooms are clean and contemporary, with detailed descriptions of each dish on the menu and above the buffet offerings (served 11 am to 4 pm daily), making it an approachable environment for newbies. Food is rotated frequently to keep things fresh and at the right temperature. A wide range of regional recipes is represented, from Butter Chicken (marinated in yogurt and spices) and Tikka Masala to Andhra curry with fish, and Pav Bhaji, a spicy vegetable appetizer with bread rolls. Come back for dinner and order straight from the menu.
Cost: $16.99 (with butter naan) or $17.99 (with garlic naan).
How to book: Dining is walk-in only.

Rob Kachelriess has been writing about Las Vegas in Thrillist for more than nine years. His work has also appeared in Travel + Leisure, Trivago Magazine, Sophisticated Living, Modern Luxury, Leafly, Las Vegas Magazine, and other publications. He's busy with all-you-can-eat snow crab. Follow him on Twitter @rkachelriess.