Everywhere You Need to Eat in Las Vegas Right Now

From modern Italian to Japanese fine dining to Martha Stewart’s first restaurant on the Strip, here are the best new spots to check out in Sin City.

Balla Italian Soul
Photo courtesy of Balla Italian Soul

As always, Las Vegas continues to evolve as a dining destination. The Strip held back on flashy openings during the depths of the pandemic, but is now picking up the pace while pushing the limits of what can be charged for steaks, cocktails, and other menu items. Blame inflation or blame greed, just know that Las Vegas is a wildly competitive market, and while some high-priced dinners justify the investment, expensive doesn’t always equal quality—thankfully, we’re here to help you navigate the difference.

The recent wave of openings includes a fried chicken joint in Chinatown, a bagel cafe in Henderson, and an overachieving roast beef sandwich spot on the Strip—all serving great food without the crazy prices. And if you are in the mood to splurge, we’ve got a new, Michelin-starred Japanese fine dining option, Martha Stewart’s first restaurant on the Strip, upscale Mexican cuisine, and more. In other words, there's something for everyone. So start planning your next meal now at one of the following new restaurants. Some may eventually wind up on the bucket list of essential Las Vegas dining experiences.

Balla Italian Soul
Balla Italian Soul | Photo by TJ Perez

Balla Italian Soul

The Sahara
$$$$

Las Vegas is a better place the more you have Shawn McClain around. The James Beard Award-winning chef remained on the Strip with Libertine Social after the untimely closure of Sage, and is now raising his profile in dramatic fashion with Balla Italian Soul. Modern, farm-fresh Italian restaurants aren't in short supply these days, but McClain oversees a tight, efficient menu with reasonable Strip prices and welcome creative accents. Chewy Roman-style pizzas are brought to life in a white oak-fired oven along with hearty proteins. Try the Sea Bream (served whole and deboned with lemon preserve, leeks, and a caper butter sauce) or the Pork Delmonico (tender slices topped with a sweet-and-sour black garlic agrodolce), complemented nicely with a selection of pastas, Italian wines, and cocktails, including the Curo di Alessandro, which is almost like a smoky take on a Penicillin. Begin any meal with the Caesar Salad (given a hint of bitterness with chicory lettuce) and Lamb Tartare. Meals are served in a charming dining room with an arched brick ceiling and charcuterie sliced market-style near the front entrance.
How to book: Make reservations via Seven Rooms.

Bodega Bagel
Photo courtesy of Bodega Bagel

Bodega Bagel

Henderson
$$$$

Sonia El-Newal first made bagels for American expats in Brussels more than 30 years ago. Today she's selling them at Bodega Bagel, which thrives on New York inspiration, but isn't your standard-issue deli. The small-batch bagels, previously offered at Rooster Boy Cafe and in pop-up form at the Vegas Test Kitchen are as great as ever—boiled, baked, and crafted by hand. No two are the exact same shape. Try them as part of an open-faced sandwich or with a simple schmear of house-made cream cheese. The menu also has its share of blintzes and bialys, as well as heartier breakfast and lunch fare, including a five-hour roasted beef brisket (served with softly scrambled eggs), a Rueben made with house-brined corned beef, and Chicken Soup loaded with meat pulled apart by hand from roasted whole chickens and simmered with sauteed leeks and other vegetables. Some of that chicken fat makes its way into the matzo balls, a flavorful touch that's hard to resist.
How to order: Bodega Bagel is primarily a walk-in operation, but you can call 702-527-7663 to place a takeaway order.

The Bedford By Martha Stewart
Photo courtesy of The Bedford By Martha Stewart

In many ways, The Bedford by Martha Stewart is what Las Vegas is all about: dining as an experience, measured in flash and starpower. Your chances of seeing the hospitality guru and television personality in her first-ever restaurant inside the Paris casino are slim, yet assumptions she licensed out her name just so another chef could come up with a menu are inaccurate. Everything, from the dishes to a dining room based on Stewart's own farmhouse, is a product of "Martha"—the person, the brand, the corporate operation—with the kitchen staff trained for months to get things right. Favorite recipes (some already posted on Martha.com, where the restaurant's decorative copper cookware is also on sale) include her family's Ballyhooed Pierogies and Smashed Potato. But here, you can enjoy the tableside presentations in person, especially the signature roasted chicken, stuffed with rosemary, thyme, and brioche breadcrumbs with a two-day brine and herb brioche butter. It's tender and juicy with a delicate, crispy skin. The price is much discussed ($89.95), but then again, it's meant for two to share. Charging more than $75 for a bottle of 19 Crimes with Stewart's face on it is more offensive. The cocktails are in the $23 range—fast becoming the new normal throughout Caesars properties.

Available for Reservations
Half Bird Chicken
Half Bird | Photo courtesy of The Golden Collective

Half Bird

Chinatown
$$$$

Brian Howard already has a bucket-list worthy restaurant with Sparrow + Wolf, but the chef is now tailoring his eclectic touches for the masses with Half Bird, a more casual restaurant where chicken is the star of the show. While there's a spicy Hot Chicken sandwich and an awesome take on chicken nuggets (or "nugs") on the menu, the chef is especially proud of the rotisserie chicken—a healthier option brined in lemon, garlic, thyme, and sea salt. The menu is rounded out by fun stuff like mac n' cheese with furikake and Spam chunks, champagne splits in red solo cups, and an after-dark walk-up window. Stop by after 11 pm on Fridays and Saturdays when a ramen special is available, with rotisserie chicken bones simmered in a miso broth and spicy bacon fat. Howard is aiming to expand Half Bird with multiple locations, so check it out now and say you were there first. Don't forget to order the Cockfight Pilsner, made in collaboration with HUDL Brewing.
How to order: Just walk in or order in advance for pickup or delivery.

Toca Madera

Toca Madera

CityCenter
$$$$

You get what you pay for. More than $10 million was spent on the Las Vegas version of Toca Madera, a lavish, lounge-like space with a sophisticated dining room, courtyard patio, and a secluded, speakeasy-style lounge. You could impress a date here no problem. Fire is a theme, whether in the surrounding fireplaces or in the presentation of the cocktails, some of which can be made with the restaurant's own private barrels of Codigo tequila. Toca Madera previously earned fans in LA and Scottsdale with an upscale take on Mexican cuisine, but the new edition in Vegas takes the identity further, evolving as a steakhouse that highlights certified A5 Kobe and other premium cuts. All steaks are enhanced with fat rendered from Japanese Wagyu. Through it all, the Latin influence remains strong, so don't shy away from the Chipotle-Mezcal Prawns, Bluefin Tuna Tacos, or a Mushroom and Truffle Quesadilla.
How to book: Make reservations via Seven Rooms.

Wakuda
Photo courtesy of Wakuda

Wakuda

Venetian
$$$$

Despite the presence of restaurants like Mizumi, Morimoto, and two versions of Nobu, Wakuda is proof that even more can be done with Japanese fine dining on the Strip. The first U.S. restaurant for Tetsuya Wakuda, who earned two Michelin stars for his work at Waku Ghin in Singapore, took over the old Morels space at the Venetian, keeping a serene patio overlooking Las Vegas Boulevard while adding a quiet bar area (with its own dedicated menu) and a stylish dining room inspired by Tokyo's vibrant Shinjuku district. A sushi counter in the back prepares delicate bites, letting the quality of the seafood speak for itself, whether it's New Zealand Ora King salmon, Canadian lobster, or Kuruma emi (Japanese prawn). Japanese A5 Wagyu is served by the ounce and Wakuda's own brand of caviar appears throughout various dishes. The restaurant is anticipating a late November debut for its indulgent omakase room, but guests can currently order a tasting menu for the table before 9 pm. The drink selection includes Asian-inspired cocktails, an impressive Japanese whisky lineup, and more than 100 sakes.
How to book: Make reservations via Seven Rooms.

Anima by EDO
Anima by EDO | Photo by Louiie Victa

Anima by EDO

West Valley
$$$$

Anima is a tapas restaurant from the team behind EDO (a bucket-list dining destination in its own right) at the Gramercy near Summerlin. Chef Oscar Amador has perfected a menu that retains its core Spanish influence while mixing in inspired global elements. More than simply "EDO West," Anima has a larger, more contemporary dining room with food stations and hand-painted murals adding to the charm and energy of the space. A few items carry over from EDO (like the Croquetas and a fantastic Dry-Aged Strip Loin Carpaccio), but most of the menu is brand new. There's a notable emphasis on seafood, so order the Peruvian-style Scallop Crudo, spicy Bluefin Sashimi, and Skin-on Branzino with sauteed pork cheeks for the table to share. Pastas are also a priority. The Truffle Cavatelli is topped with bone marrow tableside, while a single large ravioli (with Dungeness crab, sweet corn, ricotta, and poached egg) is an ultra-popular special on its way to the regular menu any day now. The hardest decision is choosing between one of 150 wines (with an emphasis on small producers) or a cocktail from the roving gin and tonic cart.
How to order: Book a reservation online or call 702-202-4291.

Available for Reservations
Brezza
Photo by Sabin Orr, courtesy of Brezza

Brezza

Resorts World
$$$$

Brezza is one of the best things about Resorts World. The restaurant offers a modern interpretation of classic Italian cuisine via inventive recipes by Nicole Brisson, who formerly ran the groundbreaking dry-aging program at Carnevino. After helping to launch Locale and the Vegas outpost of Eataly, she's finally in her own element, with the freedom to stretch some creativity and showcase a fierce dedication to fresh, local ingredients. The dining room is bright and open, but the large outdoor patio steals the show, surrounded by the glow of the Strip and 65-year-old olive trees preserved from when the property was the Stardust. The food is best enjoyed as a complete multi-course experience, beginning with farm-focused antipasti and some of the best salads on the Strip before continuing with vibrant pastas and meat or seafood entrees. There's thoughtful consideration given to vegetarian recipes, and you can't go wrong with the Cappellacci with spinach, lemon, garlic, and crispy capers. Steaks are dry-aged locally in collaboration with Creekstone Farms and flame-cooked over white oak.
How to order: Book a reservation via Seven Rooms.

Available for Reservations
Main Street Provisions
Photo courtesy of Main Street Provisions

Main Street Provisions

Downtown Arts District
$$$$

Main St. Provisions is entering a new phase after losing one great chef, Justin Kingsley Hall, and picking up another in Patrick Munster, formerly of One Steakhouse. The menu is less eclectic these days, but taps into Munster's steakhouse roots, giving diners in the Downtown Arts District a chance to fully enjoy expertly prepared Shrimp Cocktail (with a fantastic remoulade sauce), oysters on the half-shell, Filet Tartare, and a Wedge Salad with an addictive roasted tomato ranch dressing. A Braised Short Rib Dumpling is advertised as an appetizer, yet large enough to resemble a Beef Wellington with potato dough wrapped around the shredded meat. As expected, corn-fed steaks are cooked perfectly, especially the New York Strip, topped with a port reduction that enhances the meat without distraction. Yet don't overlook the roasted chicken, pulled off the bone and served with kale, topped with the drippings. Regulars will be happy to see a few favorite cocktails still in place, especially the 67 Camaro, a spicier take on a rye Manhattan.
How to order: Call 702-457-0111 to inquire about reservations.

Rosa Ristorante
Rosa Ristorante | Photo by Louiie Victa

Rosa Ristorante

Henderson & Southwest
$$$$

Rosa Ristorante reflects the East Coast Italian-American heritage of founder Rob Moore with a menu of pastas, including a spicy Rigatoni Alla Vodka, appetizers like cheesy Risotto Fritters, and entrees like a Swordfish Piccata, pounded thin with capers and white wine sauce. Those robust flavors are balanced by the chef's appreciation for fresh produce—inspired by his own at-home garden and enjoyed equally as pizza toppings and as ingredients in bright, crisp salads. An initial focus on steaks (a natural one, considering Moore's experience at Jean-Georges Vongerichten's Strip steakhouses) was toned down recently, although guests can still order a delicious wet-aged Black Angus Ribeye Medallion with a marbleized taste and a firm, filet-like texture. The cocktails are lighter, more refreshing takes on classics. An extended brunch runs Sundays and a twice-daily "Perfect Ten" happy hour offers drinks and bites for $10.

Available for Reservations
Aroma Latin Cocina
Aroma Latin Cocina | Photo by Rob Kachelriess

Aroma Latin Cocina

Henderson
$$$$

Aroma Latin Cocina is a small operation in a quaint strip mall dining room, but it's producing incredibly inspired, beautifully plated cuisine with a strong emphasis on Guatemalan and Peruvian flavors. The restaurant is led by chef Steve Kestler, former executive sous chef at EDO and a veteran of Bazaar Meat and Bouchon. With Aroma, he's carrying out his own vision with astute execution and a devotion to quality ingredients that more than compensates for any lack of flash and style in the setting. The soft, juicy filling of beef, olives, and raisins in the enchilada comes alive against the soft crunch of the dough exterior. A similar balance of textures is felt in the pork belly appetizer with small bites of meat served on crispy plantains with a lightly pickled onion slaw. Most of the entrees mix a variety of elements on one plate; nicely presented and separated to appreciate every bite.

Available for Delivery/Takeout
RPM Italian Las Vegas
RPM Italian | Photo by Lindsay Eberly

RPM Italian

Forum Shops at Caesars
$$$$

RPM Italian gets a lot of press and attention, thanks to the high profile of co-owners Bill and Giuliana Rancic, but is a complete, indulgent Vegas-worthy experience that justifies the prices. The dining room's modern design is a dramatic improvement over the space's previous and short-lived role as the Slanted Door, while the menu offers an easy layout to build a meal with multiple components. Complement hot and cold appetizers with fantastic 600-day aged prosciutto (more melt-in-your-mouth than salty), six-inch pizzas, and small shareable pastas (especially stuffed options like Lobster Pansotti and Corn Agnolotti) to leave room for ambitious entrees. The Lobster Fra Diavolo is steamed and served without mess, accompanied by a Calabrian chili butter, while a Wagyu strip is cured in whipped gorgonzola for a funky, nutty flavor similar to what you'd get from dry-aging without diminishing the heff of the cut.

Available for Reservations
Top Round
Photo courtesy of Top Round

Top Round

The Park
$$$$

You can never have too many quick and affordable dining options on the Strip, especially when so much care is put into the quality of the food. Top Round is a California fast-casual concept, expanding into Nevada in dramatic fashion with a semi-industrial space and rollup garage-style windows in The Park near T-Mobile Arena. Roast beef sandwiches are the house specialty, with 100% pure beef (no additives, no preservatives) that's marinated in spices for 24 hours, slow-roasted for at least seven hours, and sliced to order. All sauces are made in house, including a take on "Cheez Whiz" that's more like a soft condiment than the heavy product it's inspired by. The same beef is used in the gravy fries and chili. Hot dogs are made with Vegas' own Snap-O-Razzo natural franks. The juicy fried chicken is marinated in buttermilk and pickle juice, lightly breaded and, available in sandwiches or as tenders. Save room for a shake, blended with Top Round's own gelato.
How to order: Just walk in.

20, 000 Leagues Under the Sea
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea | Photo courtesy of Lost Spirits Distillery

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is Sin City’s latest bizarre and beautiful dining spectacle that actually delivers on the ticket price. The restaurant has just one or two seatings a night (Thursday-Saturday) at a communal table for 12 people inside AREA 15's Lost Spirits Distillery, where booze is a tourist attraction. Rum and other spirits are featured prominently in the recipes, often uncooked, so take it easy on the sparkling rum. Everyone enjoys the same 16-course tasting menu, based on the Jules Verne novel that shares the restaurant’s name. That means a heavy focus on proteins from land and sea. Fatty slices of Japanese bluefin otoro (soaked in strawberry rum) join Tazmanian white sturgeon caviar atop savory chicken and herb baklava. A "whale" course is actually Japanese A5 Wagyu with toasted black sesame, a grape rum sauce, and your own mini-harpoon. The showstopper is a whole-roasted pig, carved and served from an altar in dramatic fashion.

Available for Reservations
Boom Bang Fine Foods & Cocktails
Photo by Robiee Ziegler, courtesy of Boom Bang Fine Foods

Boom Bang Fine Foods combines the vision of Christian Page (formerly of Nancy Silverton's LA empire) and wife Elia Aboumrad-Page, the first female sous chef under Joёl Robuchon, offering a gourmet take on American comfort food with a few surprises and global influences. The dining room has a cozy touch of vintage decor and colorful wallpaper with a grill on the outdoor patio. The menu is shaped by the seasonal availability of ingredients, reflected in the restaurant’s latest offering of signature savory tarts. The corn dogs are the most popular appetizer—a clean bite of natural Niman Ranch franks, honey-sweetened batter, and mustard sauce. Yet Boom Bang shines brightest with its entrees, especially hearty proteins like a slow-cooked, tender pork shank with Asian soy sauce, short rib rolled onto itself on a tomahawk bone, and duck confit cooked in its own fat for 20 hours and oven-roasted to order for a crispy exterior with poached pear on the side. Aboumrad-Page pays tribute to her old boss with creamy Robuchon-esque mashed potatoes that pair well with any dish.

Available for Reservations
Delilah
Photo by Robert Miller, courtesy of Delilah

Delilah

Wynn Las Vegas
$$$$

Haven't you heard? We're in a new Roaring '20s. And while the best speakeasy bars in Las Vegas offer Prohibition-era style in small doses, old-school supper clubs are having a moment as well. Just walking into Delilah is an experience all by itself with the scene unfolding like a Martin Scorsese exposition shot. Guests enter through a bar and lounge that overlooks the main dining room, soaking in art deco extravagance before being led downstairs. It's almost like dining on a movie set with a stage for live entertainment, but the food by executive chef Joshua Smith is what seals in the authenticity. Keep the phone in your pocket and respect the no camera/no social media policy. Much like the venue itself, the menu is an exercise in indulgence with the best in prime steaks, seafood, and caviar. Even the elevated spin on "Fish and Chips" (potato-crusted dover sole) is $72. The Wagyu Beef Wellington, sliced tableside for two, is the showcase piece, but you'll find small doses of joy in the carrot side dish, presented in a souffle so sweet, it could almost be dessert.
How to order: Email for late-night bottle service reservations.

Available for Reservations

Saffron

Chinatown
$$$$

Not to be confused with a local Indian restaurant with a similar name, Saffron expands the possibilities of what it's like to have fine dining in Chinatown. The main dining room is a spectacle of tranquility, with towering ceilings, an elaborate chandelier, and a long water feature that runs underneath a hand-carved statue from Vietnam. Chef Louross Edralin has put together a menu of affordable meat-free dishes, which are even more appreciated in such an impressive dining room. Local Sundown mushrooms are put to good use in a number of recipes, most notably the gyoza (with sweet potato and the crunch of crispy onions), and the claypot rice with umami sauce. The sweet and salty beet "tartare" with avocado is everyone's favorite appetizer. There's a nice selection of organic wines, including a few vegan options and Portuguese vinho verdes.

Available for Reservations
Rob Kachelriess has been writing about Las Vegas in Thrillist for more than eight years. His work has also appeared in Travel + Leisure, Trivago Magazine, Sophisticated Living, Modern Luxury, Leafly, Las Vegas Magazine, and other publications. He's covering the tip. Follow him on Twitter @rkachelriess.