The 16 Best Steakhouses in Las Vegas

From tried and true standbys, to new and exciting additions.

steakhouse
Photo by Jeff Green, courtesy of SW Steakhouse

Eating at a great steakhouse should be on everyone's bucket list of dining experiences in Las Vegas. Some have old-school charm. Others have modern style. Yet all serve great food in a captivating environment with wine, whiskey, martinis, or whatever drink suits your fancy. And at the end of this year, we’ll be gaining another serious contender with the expansion of Peter Luger’s iconic New York steakhouse. In the meantime though, if you need help separating the good from the great, check out these top picks for the best steakhouses in Las Vegas.

Carversteak
Photo by Jeff Green, courtesy of Carversteak

Carversteak

Resorts World

It took a few months, but Resorts World finally has a full-fledged steakhouse. Executive chef Daniel Ontiveros' menu has something for everyone, from bone-in filets and dry-aged ribeyes (brushed in a red wine shallot butter) to tender cuts of Japanese Wagyu. In a fun twist, diners are given a choice of five steak knives, accompanied by detailed descriptions. Yet Carversreak is destined to be best remembered for its lobster en croute (a two-pound lobster wrapped in a pastry like a beef Wellington) with a tangy cognac cream sauce. The dining room follows a stylish, mid-century modern design with splashes of neon and vintage photos on video screens. One private dining room is surrounded by bottles of Scotch. Another is decorated with wall-to-wall steak knives. Yet the best place to sit is in the expansive outdoor patio, which is partially enclosed with its own bar, keeping any aggressive weather at bay while still allowing in the glow of the Strip.
How to book: Book a reservation on the restaurant website.

Jean Georges Steakhouse
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

The self-titled steakhouse by Jean-Georges Vongerichten specializes in fine cuts of beef in a sharp, contemporary dining room. Under the day-to-day guidance of executive chef Sean Griffin, the restaurant serves true certified Kobe and F1 Wagyu (blended with Angus), seared lightly for a subtle crust, allowing the natural flavor of the meat to shine. Other cuts are grilled over apricot wood and mesquite. Along the way, guests can enjoy a few unexpected surprises (swordfish breaded and fried Milanese-style) and Asian touches (a miso mustard steak sauce and crispy beer-battered maitake mushrooms with wildflower honey). A roaming Japanese whiskey cart, which smokes drinks tableside, is on hold during the pandemic, but may return soon.
How to book: Call 877-230-2742 or visit Seven Rooms to book a reservation.

SW Steakhouse
Photo by Jeff Green, courtesy of SW Steakhouse

SW Steakhouse

Wynn Las Vegas

It's hard to beat the scenery at SW Steakhouse, where a minimalist dining room and outdoor patio overlook the Wynn's three-acre Lake of Dreams with water shows taking place every 30 minutes. Yet the broiled steaks remain the best reason to visit. SW Steakhouse was one of the first restaurants in the country to carry certified Kobe and continues to take pride in serving high-end cuts, from Sanuki (A5 beef from cattle fed with olives) to rotating gold-level Snake River Farms selections. There's been a renewed emphasis on fresh fish, thanks to recently introduced executive chef Mark LoRusso, who formerly curated Italian seafood at Costa di Mare. So try the upgraded seafood tower or the indulgent king crab ravioli. SW Steakhouse is also honoring the Wynn's ongoing commitment to quality vegan dishes, putting together a new plant-based steak of mushrooms, red lentils, and onions.
How to book: Make a reservation via Seven Rooms.

Harlo
Photo courtesy of Harlo

Harlo

Downtown Summerlin

You can smell Harlo before you even step foot inside, thanks to the aroma of steaks cooked over white oak with an open flame. Harlo recently took over the old Andiron space at Downtown Summerlin, bringing a high-end steakhouse (and Strip prices) to the West Valley. Chef Gina Marinelli already has one of the best Italian restaurants in Las Vegas with La Strega and is reinventing her pasta program in side dishes to complement dry-aged steaks from the nation's best ranches and producers—including three different filets and a tall, 2.5-inch Bistecca alla Fiorentina. The restaurant also celebrates caviar (sourced by Forte's Nina Manchev) in a choice of formats and adds a few fun touches to the salads (a seven-minute egg on the Caesar or pastrami in the Wedge for example). The room has plenty of energy with art deco design features as well as an exceptional service team and cocktail menu.
How to book: Visit the website to book a reservation.

Golden Steer
Photo by Chris Wessling, courtesy of Golden Steer

Golden Steer

Off the Strip

The Golden Steer is more than a steakhouse. It's a piece of Las Vegas history, dating back to 1958 when there was a hitching post to park your horse out front. Today, the restaurant continues to show off vintage charm and swagger, celebrating not only the mobsters who used to frequent the joint but also Frank Sintara, Muhammad Ali, and other famous visitors who now have red-leather booths dedicated in their honor. So what about the food? The Golden Steer specializes in wet-aged steaks and tableside presentations with the Caesar salad a longtime favorite. Save room for the Bananas Foster dessert—another dish that arrives with a flashy delivery.
How to book: Make a reservation on the restaurant's website. The Golden Steer's steaks can also be shipped throughout the country.

Barry’s Downtown Prime
Photo by Patrick Miyoshi, courtesy of Barry’s Downtown Prime

Barry's Downtown Prime, tucked out of the way in the basement level of Circa, is a sprawling, circular dining space with private rooms for parties large and small. The concept by Barry Dakake (formerly of Scotch 80 Prime at the Palms) features a mix of dry and wet-aged steaks cooked over charcoal and fruitwood. The signature ribeye cap, marinated in shallots, garlic, and olive oil, is a holdover from the chef's days at N9NE Steakhouse. Try it with the mac n' cheese, truffle gnocchi, or gourmet tater tots on the side. Overall, the environment is dark and moody, with vintage design elements and the occasional indoor olive tree making an appearance. The best seats are at the 12-person chef's table, surrounded by wine racks, where Dakake himself is eager to customize a meal on the fly.
How to book: Request a reservation online.

Strip Steak
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

Stripsteak

Mandalay Bay

Michael Mina's steakhouse has a playful, casual side—seen immediately in the complimentary duck fat truffle fries that kick off every meal and a wide-open dining room that feeds off the energy of the casino while ignoring any pretentiousness. Just look at all the Raiders hats and shirts after a game wraps up next door at Allegiant Stadium. However, there are no shortcuts with the food, especially the steaks, which are butter-poached and finished on a mesquite grill, locking in a juicy tenderness and flavor. Asian influences are felt in a selection of robata skewers and the shiro-dashi vinaigrette that tops the seafood entrees.
How to book: Call 702-632-7200 or visit Seven Rooms to book a table.

THE Steak House
Photo courtesy of MGM Resorts International

The Steak House

Circus Circus

According to the team at The Steak House, the restaurant hasn't hired anyone new in 20 years—and little else has changed with the passage of time. A dry-aging room with thick hooks holding up slabs of beef greets guests near the check-in stand and the heat of a mesquite charcoal grill remains the centerpiece of a dining room modeled after a vintage hunting lounge. Chef Bob O'Brien prefers the challenge of aging choice cuts instead of prime–and it's hard to argue with the results, especially a flavorful 32-ounce bone-in ribeye or a thick slice of prime rib, which may be the best in town. The Steakhouse also includes a soup or salad, vegetable, and choice of potato with the main course—the type of all-inclusive deal that's becoming increasingly rare on the Strip. Still, make sure to start the meal off with the Boston-style crab cake (baked, not fried) with Ritz crackers holding the whole thing together.
How to book: Make a reservation online.

Available for Reservations
One Steakhouse
Photo by Peter Harasty, courtesy of One Steakhouse

One Steakhouse

Virgin Hotels

One Steakhouse used to be known as MB Steak (when Virgin Hotels was the Hard Rock), but was given a welcome makeover with all-new decor and an elaborate crystal light fixture in the bar that slowly changes color throughout the evening. In a wise move, One Steakhouse retained the services of executive chef Patrick Munster, who knows how to balance familiar favorites with inventive modifications. Why have one surf and turf on the menu when you can have three? All are presented at the table on a charcoal grill. Similar interactive touches are seen in the lobster bisque (with a creamy broth poured over chilled, fresh lobster seconds before you taste it) and the photogenic Baked Alaska dessert. No spoilers, just have your camera ready. Steak purists can't go wrong with a serving of Japanese Wagyu or a bone-in Tomahawk, sliced for two with a perfect char to balance out the rich, marbleized beef. For a change of pace, try the ricotta gnocchi with brandy peppercorn sauce as your side dish. An upstairs lounge for overflow seating has windows that open wide toward the Strip.
How to book: Make a reservation online.

Available for Reservations

José Andrés' Bazaar Meat thrives on ingenuity and an eccentric attitude. The chef's Spanish heritage is felt throughout the meal, from chicken croquettes and gazpacho to fire-roasted suckling pig and melt-in-your-mouth Jamon Iberico de Bellota (marbleized acorn-fed ham). But you're really here for the steaks and the restaurant takes things up a level with a variety of Japanese wagyu cuts and flavorful ribeyes from mature 8-year-old cows. Along the way, you'll enjoy weird stuff like foie gras cotton candy and a tomato tartare that nearly tastes like beef. For the full Bazaar Meat experience, come hungry and order one of two indulgent, multi-course tasting menus.
How to book: Make a reservation via Seven Rooms.

CUT

Venetian

Wolfgang Puck's steakhouse just keeps getting better over time. In recent years, the restaurant has dramatically renovated its dining room, mixing a stylish art deco design with soft lighting that proves it's possible to feel cozy and romantic without being dark and dim. Request a half-circle booth to maximize the comfort level and take your server up on the offer to tour the steak display, where prime Midwest cuts sit alongside luxe choices from Japan, including olive-fed snow beef. Yet the restaurant also gives extra attention to its seafood, especially its raw bar and a full two-pound Maine lobster that's pan-seared, oven-finished, and de-shelled tableside. Anything pairs well with neat pours of Whistle Pig 18 from the whiskey cart.
How to book: Make a reservation via Seven Rooms.

Cleaver
Photo by Rob Kachelriess

Cleaver

Off the Strip

It's always a bonus when a Vegas steakhouse isn't in a hotel lobby or part of a chain. Nectaly Mendoza and the team at Herbs & Rye—the standard for craft cocktails in town—expanded their Vegas imprint with Cleaver, which has enough charm, comfort, and character to attract both locals and trade show attendees from the nearby convention center. There's even a few oddball quirks like portraits of comic legends like Chirs Farley and Bill Murray dressed in vintage military garb. The steaks are similar to what you'd find at Herbs & Rye, but butchered in-house and cooked with an especially perfect char. Bone-in cuts, including the Brooklyn filet, Tomahawk ribeye, and Kansas City strip are highlights. The restaurant is deceptively large, with numerous dining rooms around different corners. The happy hour is awesome (half-off select steaks) and extended during the pandemic all night long from 5 pm to midnight.
How to book: Make a reservation via Seven Rooms.

Gordon Ramsay Steak
Photo by Anthony Mair, courtesy of Gordon Ramsey Steak

Gordon Ramsay has five Las Vegas restaurants, but his Paris steakhouse is best of all, balancing a stylish two-level dining room with exceptional cuisine. Guests enter through a "chunnel" to represent leaving France (the casino) for England (the restaurant). There's even a large Union Jack on the ceiling to erase any doubt. Ramsay's signature dishes, including his famous beef Wellington, are on the menu–as well as the sticky toffee pudding for dessert. Trenton Garvey was recently brought in as head chef after winning Ramsay's Hell's Kitchen: Young Guns reality show competition. Ask for his secret off-menu scallop dish; delicately seared with a brown sugar-glazed carrot puree, pomegranate seeds, and dill oil.
How to book: Make a reservation online.

Available for Reservations
Hank's Fine Steaks & Martinis
Photo courtesy of Station Casinos

Hank's is the only steakhouse in Henderson to serve certified Kobe beef. Ask for it as part of a smoky carpaccio or seared at low temperatures by the ounce with a choice of optional seasonings on the side. However, a 28-day bone-in Chicago ribeye could be more your speed if you're looking to pay less and eat more. The restaurant also pays close attention to the sourcing of seafood, especially the robust Hokkaido scallops. The deep lineup of martinis is popular with locals—and half-off during the daily happy hour in the bar (4-7 pm).
How to book: Make a reservation online.

Available for Reservations
Bugsy & Meyer's
Photo courtesy of Bugsy & Meyer's

Bugsy & Meyer's is a celebration of vintage style and local history. Not only is the steakhouse named after the mobsters who opened the Flamingo, it includes a bakery "storefront" as the entrance, allowing guests to sneak in and walk past the kitchen Goodfellas-style to reach the dining room. Fortunately, the kitchen does everything possible to make sure the substance of the food matches the sizzle of the environment. Bone-in cuts are dry-aged in-house for 60 days and it's hard to resist the tenderness of the prime rib cap. A seafood tower is a popular appetizer, but the calories and time are better spent on The Cadillac (a separated shellfish cocktail of lobster, shrimp, and crab) and the prime beef tartare mixed with a tart foie gras aioli.
How to book: Make a reservation online.

Available for Reservations
Delmonico Steakhouse
Photo courtesy of Delmonico Steakhouse

In a rare feat for a Vegas hotel restaurant, Emeril Lagasse's Delmonico Steakhouse has been around more than 20 years on the Strip. Everything operates under the hands-on guidance of chef de cuisine Ivan Rojas, who worked his way up through the kitchen. Prime cuts sourced from Creekstone Farms are dry-aged in-house and often given a New Orleans-inspired twist with Creole seasonings, especially the incredible bone-in Ribeye. The best way to experience the food is at the Chef's Table, which offers an up-close look at the kitchen team in action. Sealing the deal is the restaurant's famous whiskey list, which generally features more than 700 spirits from at least eight different countries. But if you just want to enjoy your steak with a deep, full-bodied red wine, there are plenty of options for that too.
How to book: Make a reservation online.

Available for Reservations
Rob Kachelriess has been writing about Las Vegas in Thrillist for more than eight years. His work has also appeared in Travel + Leisure, Trivago Magazine, Sophisticated Living, Modern Luxury, Leafly, Las Vegas Magazine, and other publications. He sticks to medium-rare. Follow him on Twitter @rkachelriess.