When Louis Armstrong crooned "Way down yonder in New Orleans / There's the land of dreamy scenes", he definitely wasn't talking about Bourbon Street. But the fried oyster po'boy at Domilise's and a Sazerac at the Kingfisher probably would've made Satchmo quite happy. So leave behind the strip clubs and "Huge Ass Beers" of that neon-lit strip (unless you're escaping into Galatoire's), and eat and drink like we actually do in the Crescent City. That is, very, very well.

If you want more, head to Thrillist New Orleans for hot openings and the rest of our longtime favorites.

Commander's Palace
Flickr/Kent Wang

Dooky Chase's Restaurant

Treme
Why you're here: Fried chicken from the reigning "Queen of New Orleans Cuisine"
What you're getting: Yes, it might have a ridiculous-sounding name that you don't want to have to say to the cab driver, but there are few chefs in the Crescent City that command more respect and deference than the inimitable Leah Chase. Her perfect, crispy fried chicken should be on every person’s bucket list (even if it isn’t literally served in a bucket).

Scott Gold

Peche Seafood Grill

Warehouse District
Why you're here: Donald “Sausage” Link’s James Beard Award-winning toast to Gulf seafood
What you're getting: Chef Link and his partners’ years of traveling the globe studying live-fire cooking have resulted in the totally fire-free raw bar, which offers some of the best bivalves in town, chosen from specific Louisiana oyster areas with an emphasis on freshness and size. Also, there's Peche's now-famous whole fish that helped net them their Beard.

Scott Gold

Pascal’s Manale

Uptown
Why you're here: BBQ shrimp, the NOLA staple created here
What you're getting: Okay, so the confusingly named “BBQ shrimp”, in the New Orleans fashion, has nothing to do with traditional BBQ. But it has everything to do with shrimp, particularly the kraken-sized monsters found in the Gulf of Mexico, poached in a ton of butter & black pepper. There are a number of places to find this favorite, but it’s the house specialty at “Manale’s”, and for good reason.

Antoine's Restaurant

Antoine's

French Quarter
Why you're here: With a whopping 14 different dining rooms and tables draped in perfectly starched white linens, it’s pretty much what everybody thinks about when they think about classic New Orleans restaurants.
What you're getting: You know, good ol' Antoine’s still looks pretty decent for being 174-years-old, and everyone from Bill Clinton to Brad Pitt to the Pope has dined there. But we should start by saying that oysters Rockefeller -- a dish so rich, it was named after the wealthiest man in the entire country -- was invented at Antoine's. Also, escargots a la Bordelaise? Ecrevisses Cardinal? Cotelettes d'agneau grillĂ©es? Check, check, and check.

Arnaud's

Arnaud's

French Quarter
Why you're here: Aside from housing the famous French 75 Bar -- where you’ll find cocktail master and historian Chris Hannah and where you absolutely should get an after-dinner drink and cigar -- you can’t help but be charmed by Arnaud's Old World elegance.
What you're getting: Another historic fine-dining institution in the Vieux Carre, it has been offering classic Creole fare since 1918. And that's not to mention live Dixieland in the Jazz Bistro, a fantastic brunch, and dishes like Shrimp Arnaud, Crab Claws Provencale, Oysters Bienville, Crawfish O’Connor, Crabmeat Karen, and other fantastic French Creole dishes named after people (or places).

Galatoire's

Galatoire's

French Quarter
Why you're here: At lunch on a Friday, there's no bigger social scene in New Orleans 
What you're getting: Jean Galatoire founded this Bourbon Street institution in 1905, and it continues to be one of the best places to eat (and to be seen) in New Orleans. This is the place to bust out your finest suit and enjoy some turtle soup au sherry, eggs Sardou, or baked oysters.

Scott Gold

Casamento’s Restaurant

Uptown
Why you're here: The coldest oysters in town, and their signature oyster loaves (fried bivalves sandwiched between buttery Texas toast)
What you're getting: There are a few things you should know about Casamento’s: they’ve been rocking the raw bar for nearly a century (since 1919, to be specific); it’s closed during the summer months; it’s small, so be prepared for a wait; and they have literally the coldest oysters in town, courtesy of a special stainless steel “oyster box” that keeps the bivalves cool sans ice, so they’re never watered down. But you should also know that if you slip him a tip as you wait in line, shucker-extraordinaire Mike will joyfully shuck an oyster directly into your mouth from across the room. Now that’s talent!

Flickr/Alyson Hurt

Commander's Palace

Garden District
Why you're here: Classic New Orleans fine-dining outside the French Quarter -- Commander's Palace is uptown in the Garden District, right across from Lafayette Cemetery No.1.
What you're getting: You might recognize the former head chef’s name: Emeril Lagasse, who helmed the Palace’s kitchen in the '80s, long before “Bam!”. These days, chef Tory McPhail has that job, and isn’t doing so bad, if you count James Beard Awards as any measure of job performance. And if you’ve never had your post-dinner coffee filled with booze and lit on fire in front of you, make sure to order the café brûlot.

Tujague's Restaurant

Tujague's

French Quarter
Why you're here: It's the second-oldest restaurant in the Big Easy (1856, to be precise) and has one of the most iconic bars in the country. 
What you're getting: Given its placement on Decatur Street near Cafe Du Monde and its gigantic, iconic sign, Tujague's is pretty hard to miss. A meal here shouldn’t be missed, either -- you can get a traditional shrimp Creole, BBQ shrimp, veal chop, or lamb loin, as well as the famous brisket with Creole horseradish sauce. Don’t ask for a stool at the bar -- it’s stand-up only -- but do order the delicious Grasshopper cocktail, which they invented and which contains no actual grasshoppers.

Willie Mae's Scotch House

Willie Mae’s Scotch House

Seventh Ward
Why you're here: New Orleans wouldn’t be New Orleans without Willie Mae’s.
What you're getting: Though natives will debate this, most consider Willie Mae’s to be the sine qua non of fried chicken in NOLA. After being devastated by Hurricane Katrina, locals and visiting do-gooders made sure that this beloved institution made it back on its feet.

SoBou
Scott Gold

Cane & Table

French Quarter
Why you're here: The drinks in this Havana-inflected, "proto-Tiki" joint are the real deal.
What you're getting: When this place opened -- thanks to the pedigree of owners Neal Bodenheimer from legendary cocktail joint Cure, alongside rum savant Nick Detrich -- the hype was Bourbon Street-at-9pm-on-a-Saturday loud, and with food to match, the upscale Tiki spot continues to draw crowds.

Scott Gold

Arnaud’s French 75 Bar

French Quarter
Why you're here: A proper French 75, and those air-light soufflĂ© potatoes will get anyone’s evening off to the proper start.
What you're getting: There’s a small handful of mixologists in New Orleans who are as well-known and respected as celebrity chefs, and Arnaud’s Chris Hannah is one of them. He specializes in reviving old-fashioned 'tails, but also has a slew of creative originals on the seasonal menu.

Scott Gold

Carousel Bar at the Hotel Monteleone

French Quarter
Why you're here: Not only does the historic bar manage to make a fair ride look glamorous, but the Pimm's Cup here is the best in the city.
What you're getting: Grab a drink at the Tales of the Cocktail HQ's 64-year-old lobby lounge, where the famous revolving bar once inspired regulars like Ernest Hemingway and Truman Capote to write stories better... then become incomprehensible after imbibing at a spinning bar.

Finn McCool's Irish Pub

Finn McCool’s Irish Pub

Mid-City
Why you're here: Guinness, 'dogs, darts, and killer food courtesy of Boo Koo BBQ
What you're getting: Soccer hooligans of the Big Easy, unite at Finn’s! (Or, actually, don't?) There are other sports displayed on the 8ft TV, of course, but few seem more appropriate here than, ahem, “football”, paired with a properly poured pint of Guinness. 

Scott Gold

Kingfish

French Quarter
Why you're here: Head barman Chris McMillian is referred to as "legendary", and a sip of his Sazerac matches his rep.
What you're getting: Pair McMillian's expertise in the New Orleans bar with chef Greg Sonnier in the kitchen, and you’ll have an entire night you’re not likely to forget. Start at the bar early when you can get a great seat, knock back a few, then move to a table.

SoBou

SoBou

French Quarter
Why you're here: This restaurant bar, from the group that runs Commander's, focuses on drinks that match the caliber of the kitchen.
What you're getting: According to SoBou’s bar-chef extraordinaire, Abigail Gullo, "For a city that takes such great pride in its cuisine AND as much pride in its liquid culture, it's only natural that they would be combined and paired. This is a city of mash-ups, from Cajun and Creole cuisine to Vietnamese to the different ingredients of the Sazerac. We love to incorporate the whole culture into one big gumbo pot, literally. So it only makes sense that we would want to have our exquisite cuisine matched by exquisite drinks." Hence, if chef Juan Carlos Gonzalez has certain chilis on the menu, you’d better believe that those same chilis will find themselves on Abigail’s list of house cocktails.

Bellocq

Bellocq

CBD
Why you're here: 'Tails from the dudes behind Cure in a sexy hotel lobby setting
What you're getting: Named for a photographer who shot the Red Light District during Prohibition, Hotel Modern's boozery, Bellocq, is a candle-lit throwback that stirs up nothing but pre-Temperance cobblers, crustas, smashes, and punches... which one should drink in moderation lest they lead to any.

Twelve Mile Limit

Twelve Mile Limit

Mid-City
Why you're here: Some of the city's best cocktails tucked away in Mid-City
What you're getting: What to say about this place other than, if you happen to be there at 4pm on a Sunday afternoon, you can get both a haircut AND a drink for all of 10 bucks? Well, also that there’s free food on Mondays. Oh, and Shortall’s BBQ to chow down on from Tuesday-Friday.

The Avenue Pub

The Avenue Pub 

Lower Garden District
Why you're here: This is one of the best beer bars in the country, but the attitude is laid-back and unpretentious.
What you're getting: With 40 brews on draught and more than triple that by the bottle, you’d be hard-pressed not to find something to satisfy even the nerdiest of beer nerds. Do they have Evil Twin Imperial Biscotti Break? Southern Tier Creme Brulee Stout? Green Flash Citra Session? Yes, yes, and yes. And if you can get a seat on the balcony, order up some Dump Truck Fries (BĂ©chamel, roast pork, grilled onions, and wine au jus) and prepare to never leave.

Chris Watkins
Killer Poboys

Killer Poboys

French Quarter
Why you're here: Their lamb sausage po'boy shows why the new(ish) kid in town won hearts and stomachs so quickly.
What you're getting: Located in the back of the Erin Rose bar, this po'boy pop-up is well-known for its modern versions of the classic NOLA sandwich, including an eponymously killer po'boy featuring Moroccan-spiced lamb sausage with herby tzatziki sauce and sumac carrot relish.

Scott Gold

R & O's

Bucktown/Metairie
Why you're here: R & O's is the best introduction to New Orleans' oft-forgotten other famous food: roast beef.
What you're getting: It may be an Italian spot featuring generous pizzas, veal Parm, and spaghetti, but the roast beef at R & O's is absolutely the best in the city. Chopped (not sliced), crazy tender, and drowning in dark, rich gravy, it’s the stuff that dreams are made of. Po'boy dreams.

Scott Gold

Crabby Jack’s

Uptown
​Why you're here: Slow-roasted duck po'boy. Yep, slow-roasted duck.
What you're getting: You know good things are going to come out of a po'boy shop helmed by Jacques Leonardi, the man behind Jacques-Imo’s Cafe. The slow-roasted, pulled duck po'boy at Crabby Jack’s is the only one like it in the city, and for good reason: it’s unbeatable.

Scott Gold

Parkway Bakery and Tavern

Mid-City
Why you're here: Mid-City's go-to po'boy haven has epic golden-fried shrimp po'boys.
What you're getting: This bakery goes all the way back to 1911, though in modern times it’s become well-known as a go-to spot for po'boys, particularly one spilling over with crispy fried shrimp. When the POTUS came to town and wanted a po'boy, he went here. You should, too.

Scott Gold

Sammy's Food Service & Deli

Gentilly
Why you're here: The Ray Ray's a chicken cordon bleu on French bread. Yep.
What you're getting: A Po'boy Fest favorite, Southern fried chicken with grilled ham and Swiss cheese makes up Sammy’s famous Ray Ray po'boy. It’s just awesome.

Mother's Restaurant

Mother's Restaurant

CBD
Why you're here: It’s a classic. A legend.
What you're getting: While some folks consider Mother’s too touristy these days, visitors are right to line up around the corner for a Famous Ferdi Special, a po'boy featuring baked ham, roast beef, “debris” gravy, and all dressed up.

Scott Gold

Domilise's Po-Boys

Uptown
Why you're here: The perfectly golden-fried goodness of the fried shrimp/oyster po'boy
What you're getting: Yeah, there’s going to be a line at Domilise’s. You know why? Every fried seafood po'boy is battered and fried to order, resulting in a bit of a wait, but it’s worth it. Get the half-and-half, one side oyster, the other shrimp. Bonus points for adding spicy ketchup (their house condiment), which isn’t traditional, but it’s a genius touch.

Looking for more places to eat and drink in New Orleans? Check out the rest of our guides to the Crescent City or sign up for our daily NOLA email. 

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1. Galatoire's 209 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Established in 1905, Galatoire’s has remained a Bourbon Street bulwark of French Creole cuisine. The restaurant blends tradition with curiosity as it juxtaposes gumbo, shrimp remoulade, and oysters Rockefeller with deep-fried zucchini sticks, (which you’re meant to plunge into a mix of Tabasco sauce and powdered sugar) and duck crepes with homemade Boursin cheese, Port-cherry reduction, and pistachios. Galatoire’s keeps things elegant with its forest green walls, lace curtains, and mirrored walls, a glimpse into a past worthy of a Faulkner novel.

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2. Dooky Chase's Restaurant 2301 Orleans Ave, New Orleans, LA 70119-5025

The history of this cozy Treme spot is just as interesting as the authentic Creole flavors it serves up: perfectly crispy fried chicken, shrimp Clemenceau, and hearty, zesty seafood gumbo. Helmed by Chef Leah Chase -- known to locals and notable folk like President Obama and Beyoncé as the “Queen of Creole” -- the spot’s storied past covers its tenure as a po-boy and lottery shop in turned, as of 1941, beloved restaurant and community outpost for live music, local artwork, and civil rights. It’s the perfect option for a relaxed yet refined lunch during the week, and we suggest making a reservation -- it’s no secret that Dooky Chase’s is a Big Easy institution, and seating fills up fast.

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3. Willie Mae's Scotch House 2401 Saint Ann St, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

The fried chicken at Willie Mae’s Scotch House is the best in the United States. No joke: it was dubbed such by the Travel Channel and Food Network, and also won the James Beard Award for “America’s Classic Restaurant for the Southern Region.” Tucked away the Treme neighborhood, the cozy spot features all the accoutrements of a beloved local haunt -- memorabilia mounted throughout, news clippings chronicling the success of the family-owned business (which has been open since 1957), homey environs -- and it’s worth noting that there’s always a line out the door, regardless of weather. It’s a walk-ins only spot, so be prepared to wait -- but the soul food here is so satisfying, and it’s entirely worth it.

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4. Tujague's 823 Decatur St, New Orleans, 70116 (French Quarter)

Located in the heart of the French Quarter, Tujague's is the second oldest restaurant in NOLA, a fact evidenced by a timeless, extensive old-school menu that focuses around traditional Creole fare. The place also houses one of the most iconic bars in the country, and invented the minty post-dinner Grasshopper cocktail, which is delicious, and contains no actual grasshoppers.

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5. Antoine's Restaurant 713 Saint Louis St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Opened in 1840, this elegant St. Louis Street spot is the oldest French-Creole fine dining restaurant in New Orleans. In its fifth generation of family ownership, Antoine’s Restaurant offers a menu nothing short of old-fashioned, with Oysters Rockefeller served with Antoine’s original Rockefeller sauce created in 1889, creamed spinach, potatoes au gratin, and gulf fish served grilled, fried, poached, and sautéed. The Baked Alaska is not to be missed, and while you’re awaiting its arrival, promenade around the 14 dining rooms, each decorated to the nines with rich oak paneling, gilded accents, and portraits of the centuries of illustrious figures who once dined in the very spot in which you’re currently stuffing your face with pound cake and flambéed egg white meringue.

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6. Arnaud's Restaurant 813 Bienville St, New Orleans, LA 70112 (French Quarter)

Arnaud’s is a decades-old French Quarter staple that embodies the French Creole style in architecture, décor, and, of course, food. Inside the red building lined with innumerable French windows and mint green balconies is a dining room straight out of a Southern novel with potted palm fronds, mosaic tile floors, and opulent chandeliers. Come for dinner or for the jazz brunch, where a jazz trio will serenade you while you decide between gumbo and shrimp remoulade.

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7. Casamento's 4330 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70115

A New Orleans landmark since 1919, Casamento's is the grandaddy of all oyster bars, serving up fried oyster po' boys and equally delicious raw oysters, shucked right in front of you. The space is small and completely tiled, because the owners know oyster juice spillage is inevitable when you're marathon-slurping your meal.

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8. Peche Seafood Grill 800 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Central Business District)

At PSG, East Coast flavors meet Southern hospitality in the form of Cajun inspired charcoal grilled seafood delicacies, raw bar options, and oysters on the half. This Warehouse District space features a rustic, wood-lacquered dining room that's spacious and yet intimate; the perfect place to catch up with a group over a seafood tower "for the table."

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9. Pascal's Manale Restaurant 1838 Napoleon Ave, New Orleans, LA 70115 (Uptown)

Look for the brightly glowing neon cursive on Napoleon Avenue, follow the tantalizing scent of Cajun spices, and voilà: you’ve arrived at Pascal’s Manale, a cozy Uptown joint where shellfish reign. Blending bold Creole flavors with Italian influences, the kitchen serves heavy-hitting favorites like frutta del mare drenched in homemade marinara sauce and the house specialty: Pascal’s Barbecue Shrimp, a local legend for its hefty portion and spice-obsessed butter sauce.

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10. The Avenue Pub 1732 Saint Charles Ave, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Garden District)

Located in the Lower Garden District, this American craft beer pub is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The tap list is heavy on one-and-done offerings with enough rarities to keep the beer nerds at bay, while the bottle list is about as thick as a small-town phone book, offering up everything from Belgian farmhouses to all-American IPAs, all of which taste considerably better when paired with the famous bechamel and pork Dump Truck Fries.

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11. Kingfish 337 Chartres, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Thibodaux native, Chef Nathan Richard, created a menu at the casual Kingfish restaurant that combines the Cajun reverence for honoring ingredients and culinary history with a sophisticated, often playful take on modern trends that excite visitors and natives alike. The plateau de fruits des mer is this spots take on a traditional meat charcuterie board, using local seafood to create all manner of fresh and cured sausages, terrines, and smoked items.

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12. Twelve Mile Limit 500 S Telemachus St, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

Twelve Mile has all the little things that make a bar feel homey. You’ve got food if you need it, places to sit and stare at the curios that catch your eye -- like the stuffed shark and squid hanging near the Hyperbole and a Half print on the wall -- a solid jukebox, pool, and personalized matchbooks to light your smokes or pass a number to someone. It’s the neighborhood bar worth leaving your actual neighborhood to adopt as your own.

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13. Finn McCool's Irish Pub 3701 Banks St, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

In the tradition of Irish pubs, Finn McCool’s is more than a bar. The Mid-City institution borrows from the best of two cultures: an Irish pub that functions more like a community center, and a no-pretensions New Orleans corner bar that welcomes all comers. What you’ll find at Finn’s are friendly bartenders and a heavily local crowd (unless, maybe, it’s St. Patrick’s Day). If you’re looking to watch football -- and I don’t mean the American kind -- Finn’s is the best place in New Orleans to plant yourself.

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14. Bellocq 936 St. Charles, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Central Business District)

Located in the Hotel Modern, Bellocq is an upscale cocktail lounge that specializes in Cobblers (drinks served with crushed ice, citrus, berries and a fruit garnish) and other craft cocktails in an upscale and intimate atmosphere. Plush couches and vintage bar stools provide ample seating, and you won't have to fight a crowd to get a drink.

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15. The Carousel Bar & Lounge 214 Royal St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Aptly named, the famous Carousel Bar & Lounge in the Hotel Monteleone is NOLA's only revolving bar. But don't worry -- you'll only turn one revolution every 15 minutes, so you probably won't puke up that last Vieux Carre on that pretty patron sitting to your right.

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16. SoBou 310 Chartres St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Located inside the W Hotel, SoBou is a spirited restaurant south of Bourbon St (hence the name) feels like a modern-day Creole saloon. The restaurant and lounge is known for its hand-crafted cocktails, and serves creative spins on traditional bar snacks like crispy pork skin and spicy beer nuts, as well as some heartier dishes. SoBou also has a beer garden with beer taps in the tables and self-serve wine machines.

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17. Arnaud's French 75 Bar 813 Bienville St, New Orleans, LA 70112 (French Quarter)

Originally designated as a "gentlemen only area" in NOLA's early days, this cocktail bar located within Arnaud's Restaurant features drinks like the Pisco Derby (that's pisco, lavender honey syrup, lime, and grapefruit) and bar snacks like Oysters en Brochette (translation: oysters wrapped with bacon and deep fried). You'll feel extra fancy having those cocktails and snacks served to you by bartenders clad in white tuxedos. In addition to more inventive drinks, you can't go wrong with the killer Old Fashioned or Sidecar either.

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18. Cane & Table 1113 Decatur St, New Orleans, LA 70116 (French Quarter)

There are many things to enjoy about this throwback Caribbean restaurant and bar -- think Navy-strength rum and house-made falernum -- but best enjoyed here is the “Boss Colada”, a long and tropical drink fashioned from fresh pineapple, lime, Baska Snäps, and Peychauds bitters, garnished with a long pineapple leaf. Be warned: this bar is so low-key that there isn't even a sign out front. To find it, look for the line at Coop's on Decatur; it's next door.

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19. R & O's 216 Metairie Hammond Hwy, Metairie, LA 70005

R & O's plates a variety of Creole/Cajun dishes, but they're best known for their po' boys and other tasty sammies.

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20. Domilise's Po-Boys 5240 Annunciation St, New Orleans, LA 70115 (Uptown)

Under the same family ownership for over 100 years, Domilise's is something of a New Orleans po-boy haven. Inside a boxy pale-yellow building and distinguished only by a hand-painted sign, Domilise's would be easy to miss if it weren't for the line that typically stretches out the door. The catfish and fried oyster po-boys are among the most popular items on the menu, but guests have the option to split their sandwiches half-and-half with other toppers like shrimp and roast beef. Half-shrimp and half-oyster on the same bun is the move, if you ask us.

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21. Parkway Bakery & Tavern 538 Hagan Ave, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

No one does po’boys like Parkway, and it’s no surprise: the Mid-City spot has been open since 1911, and the po’boy has been a staple of the menu since 1929. Regardless of whether you’re a local, a passerby, or even President Obama (who makes a point to snag a golden fried shrimp po’boy here when business brings him to the Big Easy), you really can’t go wrong with any of these delicious bad boys, all of which are served on fresh, house-made bread. Pro tip: if you can’t handle the spice level, a booze-loving mint julep will help.

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22. Mother's Restaurant 401 Poydras St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Central Business District)

Famous for their po-boys and jambalaya, Mother's has been specializing in authentic New Orleans-style cooking since it opened its doors in 1938.

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23. Sammy's Food Service & Deli 3000 Elysian Fields Ave, New Orleans, LA 70122

This Cajun/Creole resto has a vast menu featuring a variety of options for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but they're best known for their sammies, like the Ray Ray po-boy, which is built with Southern fried chicken with grilled ham and Swiss.

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24. Killer Poboys 811 Conti St, New Orleans, LA 70112 (French Quarter)

The French Quarter's popular Killer Poboys serves exactly that: top-notch po-boys, cooked up in the tiny kitchen at the back of Irish pub Erin Rose on Conti Street. The po-boys here are crafted with a new-age eye, some even incorporating untraditional ingredients like pork belly, smoked salmon, and sweet potato. The cash-only counter also serves up standout sandwiches like BBQ chicken confit, Black Bear beef debris, and chorizo & egg.

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25. Crabby Jack's 428 Jefferson Hwy, Jefferson, LA 70121

The po-boy has gained legend status in NOLA thanks to places like Crabby Jacks, whose award-winning oyster po-boy has been delighting patrons since the place opened in 2002.

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