Commander's Palace
Flickr/Kent Wang
Scott Gold
Scott Gold
Antoine's Restaurant
Arnaud's
Galatoire's
Scott Gold
Flickr/Alyson Hurt
Tujague's Restaurant
Willie Mae's Scotch House
SoBou
Scott Gold
Scott Gold
Scott Gold
Finn McCool's Irish Pub
Scott Gold
SoBou
Bellocq
Twelve Mile Limit
The Avenue Pub
Chris Watkins
Killer Poboys
Scott Gold
Scott Gold
Scott Gold
Scott Gold
Mother's Restaurant
Scott Gold
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1. Galatoire's 209 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Established in 1905, Galatoire’s has remained a Bourbon Street bulwark of French Creole cuisine. The restaurant blends tradition with curiosity as it juxtaposes gumbo, shrimp remoulade, and oysters Rockefeller with deep-fried zucchini sticks, (which you’re meant to plunge into a mix of Tabasco sauce and powdered sugar) and duck crepes with homemade Boursin cheese, Port-cherry reduction, and pistachios. Galatoire’s keeps things elegant with its forest green walls, lace curtains, and mirrored walls, a glimpse into a past worthy of a Faulkner novel.

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2. Dooky Chase's Restaurant 2301 Orleans Ave, New Orleans, LA 70119-5025

The history of this cozy Treme spot is just as interesting as the authentic Creole flavors it serves up: perfectly crispy fried chicken, shrimp Clemenceau, and hearty, zesty seafood gumbo. Helmed by Chef Leah Chase -- known to locals and notable folk like President Obama and Beyoncé as the “Queen of Creole” -- the spot’s storied past covers its tenure as a po-boy and lottery shop in turned, as of 1941, beloved restaurant and community outpost for live music, local artwork, and civil rights. It’s the perfect option for a relaxed yet refined lunch during the week, and we suggest making a reservation -- it’s no secret that Dooky Chase’s is a Big Easy institution, and seating fills up fast.

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3. Willie Mae's Scotch House 2401 Saint Ann St, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

The fried chicken at Willie Mae’s Scotch House is the best in the United States. No joke: it was dubbed such by the Travel Channel and Food Network, and also won the James Beard Award for “America’s Classic Restaurant for the Southern Region.” Tucked away the Treme neighborhood, the cozy spot features all the accoutrements of a beloved local haunt -- memorabilia mounted throughout, news clippings chronicling the success of the family-owned business (which has been open since 1957), homey environs -- and it’s worth noting that there’s always a line out the door, regardless of weather. It’s a walk-ins only spot, so be prepared to wait -- but the soul food here is so satisfying, and it’s entirely worth it.

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4. Tujague's 823 Decatur St, New Orleans, 70116 (French Quarter)

Located in the heart of the French Quarter, Tujague's is the second oldest restaurant in NOLA, a fact evidenced by a timeless, extensive old-school menu that focuses around traditional Creole fare. The place also houses one of the most iconic bars in the country, and invented the minty post-dinner Grasshopper cocktail, which is delicious, and contains no actual grasshoppers.

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5. Antoine's Restaurant 713 Saint Louis St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Opened in 1840, this elegant St. Louis Street spot is the oldest French-Creole fine dining restaurant in New Orleans. In its fifth generation of family ownership, Antoine’s Restaurant offers a menu nothing short of old-fashioned, with Oysters Rockefeller served with Antoine’s original Rockefeller sauce created in 1889, creamed spinach, potatoes au gratin, and gulf fish served grilled, fried, poached, and sautéed. The Baked Alaska is not to be missed, and while you’re awaiting its arrival, promenade around the 14 dining rooms, each decorated to the nines with rich oak paneling, gilded accents, and portraits of the centuries of illustrious figures who once dined in the very spot in which you’re currently stuffing your face with pound cake and flambéed egg white meringue.

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6. Arnaud's Restaurant 813 Bienville St, New Orleans, LA 70112 (French Quarter)

Arnaud’s is a decades-old French Quarter staple that embodies the French Creole style in architecture, décor, and, of course, food. Inside the red building lined with innumerable French windows and mint green balconies is a dining room straight out of a Southern novel with potted palm fronds, mosaic tile floors, and opulent chandeliers. Come for dinner or for the jazz brunch, where a jazz trio will serenade you while you decide between gumbo and shrimp remoulade.

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7. Casamento's 4330 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70115

A New Orleans landmark since 1919, Casamento's is the grandaddy of all oyster bars, serving up fried oyster po' boys and equally delicious raw oysters, shucked right in front of you. The space is small and completely tiled, because the owners know oyster juice spillage is inevitable when you're marathon-slurping your meal.

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8. Peche Seafood Grill 800 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Central Business District)

At PSG, East Coast flavors meet Southern hospitality in the form of Cajun inspired charcoal grilled seafood delicacies, raw bar options, and oysters on the half. This Warehouse District space features a rustic, wood-lacquered dining room that's spacious and yet intimate; the perfect place to catch up with a group over a seafood tower "for the table."

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9. Pascal's Manale Restaurant 1838 Napoleon Ave, New Orleans, LA 70115 (Uptown)

Look for the brightly glowing neon cursive on Napoleon Avenue, follow the tantalizing scent of Cajun spices, and voilà: you’ve arrived at Pascal’s Manale, a cozy Uptown joint where shellfish reign. Blending bold Creole flavors with Italian influences, the kitchen serves heavy-hitting favorites like frutta del mare drenched in homemade marinara sauce and the house specialty: Pascal’s Barbecue Shrimp, a local legend for its hefty portion and spice-obsessed butter sauce.

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10. The Avenue Pub 1732 Saint Charles Ave, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Garden District)

Located in the Lower Garden District, this American craft beer pub is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The tap list is heavy on one-and-done offerings with enough rarities to keep the beer nerds at bay, while the bottle list is about as thick as a small-town phone book, offering up everything from Belgian farmhouses to all-American IPAs, all of which taste considerably better when paired with the famous bechamel and pork Dump Truck Fries.

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11. Kingfish 337 Chartres, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Thibodaux native, Chef Nathan Richard, created a menu at the casual Kingfish restaurant that combines the Cajun reverence for honoring ingredients and culinary history with a sophisticated, often playful take on modern trends that excite visitors and natives alike. The plateau de fruits des mer is this spots take on a traditional meat charcuterie board, using local seafood to create all manner of fresh and cured sausages, terrines, and smoked items.

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12. Twelve Mile Limit 500 S Telemachus St, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

Twelve Mile has all the little things that make a bar feel homey. You’ve got food if you need it, places to sit and stare at the curios that catch your eye -- like the stuffed shark and squid hanging near the Hyperbole and a Half print on the wall -- a solid jukebox, pool, and personalized matchbooks to light your smokes or pass a number to someone. It’s the neighborhood bar worth leaving your actual neighborhood to adopt as your own.

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13. Finn McCool's Irish Pub 3701 Banks St, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

In the tradition of Irish pubs, Finn McCool’s is more than a bar. The Mid-City institution borrows from the best of two cultures: an Irish pub that functions more like a community center, and a no-pretensions New Orleans corner bar that welcomes all comers. What you’ll find at Finn’s are friendly bartenders and a heavily local crowd (unless, maybe, it’s St. Patrick’s Day). If you’re looking to watch football -- and I don’t mean the American kind -- Finn’s is the best place in New Orleans to plant yourself.

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14. Bellocq 936 St. Charles, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Central Business District)

Located in the Hotel Modern, Bellocq is an upscale cocktail lounge that specializes in Cobblers (drinks served with crushed ice, citrus, berries and a fruit garnish) and other craft cocktails in an upscale and intimate atmosphere. Plush couches and vintage bar stools provide ample seating, and you won't have to fight a crowd to get a drink.

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15. The Carousel Bar & Lounge 214 Royal St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Aptly named, the famous Carousel Bar & Lounge in the Hotel Monteleone is NOLA's only revolving bar. But don't worry -- you'll only turn one revolution every 15 minutes, so you probably won't puke up that last Vieux Carre on that pretty patron sitting to your right.

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16. SoBou 310 Chartres St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (French Quarter)

Located inside the W Hotel, SoBou is a spirited restaurant south of Bourbon St (hence the name) feels like a modern-day Creole saloon. The restaurant and lounge is known for its hand-crafted cocktails, and serves creative spins on traditional bar snacks like crispy pork skin and spicy beer nuts, as well as some heartier dishes. SoBou also has a beer garden with beer taps in the tables and self-serve wine machines.

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17. Arnaud's French 75 Bar 813 Bienville St, New Orleans, LA 70112 (French Quarter)

Originally designated as a "gentlemen only area" in NOLA's early days, this cocktail bar located within Arnaud's Restaurant features drinks like the Pisco Derby (that's pisco, lavender honey syrup, lime, and grapefruit) and bar snacks like Oysters en Brochette (translation: oysters wrapped with bacon and deep fried). You'll feel extra fancy having those cocktails and snacks served to you by bartenders clad in white tuxedos. In addition to more inventive drinks, you can't go wrong with the killer Old Fashioned or Sidecar either.

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18. Cane & Table 1113 Decatur St, New Orleans, LA 70116 (French Quarter)

There are many things to enjoy about this throwback Caribbean restaurant and bar -- think Navy-strength rum and house-made falernum -- but best enjoyed here is the “Boss Colada”, a long and tropical drink fashioned from fresh pineapple, lime, Baska Snäps, and Peychauds bitters, garnished with a long pineapple leaf. Be warned: this bar is so low-key that there isn't even a sign out front. To find it, look for the line at Coop's on Decatur; it's next door.

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19. R & O's 216 Metairie Hammond Hwy, Metairie, LA 70005

R & O's plates a variety of Creole/Cajun dishes, but they're best known for their po' boys and other tasty sammies.

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20. Domilise's Po-Boys 5240 Annunciation St, New Orleans, LA 70115 (Uptown)

Under the same family ownership for over 100 years, Domilise's is something of a New Orleans po-boy haven. Inside a boxy pale-yellow building and distinguished only by a hand-painted sign, Domilise's would be easy to miss if it weren't for the line that typically stretches out the door. The catfish and fried oyster po-boys are among the most popular items on the menu, but guests have the option to split their sandwiches half-and-half with other toppers like shrimp and roast beef. Half-shrimp and half-oyster on the same bun is the move, if you ask us.

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21. Parkway Bakery & Tavern 538 Hagan Ave, New Orleans, LA 70119 (Mid City)

No one does po’boys like Parkway, and it’s no surprise: the Mid-City spot has been open since 1911, and the po’boy has been a staple of the menu since 1929. Regardless of whether you’re a local, a passerby, or even President Obama (who makes a point to snag a golden fried shrimp po’boy here when business brings him to the Big Easy), you really can’t go wrong with any of these delicious bad boys, all of which are served on fresh, house-made bread. Pro tip: if you can’t handle the spice level, a booze-loving mint julep will help.

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22. Mother's Restaurant 401 Poydras St, New Orleans, LA 70130 (Central Business District)

Famous for their po-boys and jambalaya, Mother's has been specializing in authentic New Orleans-style cooking since it opened its doors in 1938.

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23. Sammy's Food Service & Deli 3000 Elysian Fields Ave, New Orleans, LA 70122

This Cajun/Creole resto has a vast menu featuring a variety of options for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but they're best known for their sammies, like the Ray Ray po-boy, which is built with Southern fried chicken with grilled ham and Swiss.

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24. Killer Poboys 811 Conti St, New Orleans, LA 70112 (French Quarter)

The French Quarter's popular Killer Poboys serves exactly that: top-notch po-boys, cooked up in the tiny kitchen at the back of Irish pub Erin Rose on Conti Street. The po-boys here are crafted with a new-age eye, some even incorporating untraditional ingredients like pork belly, smoked salmon, and sweet potato. The cash-only counter also serves up standout sandwiches like BBQ chicken confit, Black Bear beef debris, and chorizo & egg.

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25. Crabby Jack's 428 Jefferson Hwy, Jefferson, LA 70121

The po-boy has gained legend status in NOLA thanks to places like Crabby Jacks, whose award-winning oyster po-boy has been delighting patrons since the place opened in 2002.

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