Courtesy of BlackTail

BlackTail

Financial District

From the team behind The Dead Rabbit, BlackTail is a bar inspired by Prohibition-era Cuba, when booze-seeking New Yorkers would head to the island via seaplanes with black-painted tails. Since the planes would fly over Pier A, the bar’s Pier A Harbor House is a fitting location -- though you’ll have to use your imagination a little if you’re hoping for the full luxury transit experience. The drink menu is all updated takes on classic mixed drinks from the 1920s-1950s (think highballs, sours, Old Fashioneds, and punches), and the food is also a nod to the era (like a braised short rib ragout sloppy Joe and a confit rabbit leg Cuban sandwich).

Oleg March

Casa Neta Mezcaleria & Tequileria

Flatiron

Tacos and small plates, like queso fundido and a daily rotating ceviche, help soak up inevitable rounds upon rounds of drinks you'll order at this new Flatiron Mexican joint. Casa Neta offers over 120 agave-based spirits in a two-floor space covered in custom murals and other art. Opt for a classic margarita (with tequila or mezcal) or one of the inventive originals, like the Oaxacan Sunscreen, which is made with mezcal, house horchata, coconut, pineapple, lime, and Fernet-Vallet, and tastes nothing like those cocktails you tried to smuggle into Governors Ball in sunscreen bottles.

Cole Saladino/Thrillist

Do or Dive

Bed-Stuy

With a spray-painted “v” on top of the old sign, Bed-Stuy’s beloved Do or Dine space has effectively been reborn as Do or Dive, another neighborhood dive from the team behind Williamsburg bars Skinny Dennis, Rocka Rolla, and Lucky Dog. As with the other bars, you’ll find an eclectic mix of knickknacks here -- a jukebox, vintage TVs, a random shark hanging on the wall -- as well as everyone’s favorite frozen “coffee thing” (aka Uncle Willie's Frozen Coffee) and 32oz Budweisers for $5.

Cole Saladino/Thrillist

Faun

Prospect Heights

The latest in "cute Prospect Heights restaurants with gardens" (it’s a category!) is Faun, an Italian-inspired American restaurant from chef Brian Leth (previously of Vinegar Hill House). Grab a seat in said verdant garden and order some seasonal plates to share, like blue crab with fryer pepper, cantaloupe, and peanuts, or hake with corn, polenta, and truffles. Faun’s also the latest restaurant to adopt the no-tipping method -- service is included in the menu prices.

Francine Dominguez

The Last Word

Astoria

Enter through a “hardware store” on Ditmars Blvd and you’ll find yourself inside Astoria’s newest cocktail bar, which looks like Raines Law Room was plopped down in Queens -- red velvet curtains, plush chairs, exposed brick, a tin ceiling. The similarities make sense, given that one of the owners was also behind the Chelsea speakeasy. And while the city certainly isn’t in desperate need of another speakeasy, that fact is basically irrelevant when faced with drinks like the Fat Monk with pear-infused reposado, hefeweizen syrup, egg whites, lemon, and orange bitters.

Courtesy of Paowalla

Paowalla

SoHo

Paowalla, which opened at the end of last month, marks chef Floyd Cardoz’s return to New York. The former Tabla and North End Grill chef was most recently in Mumbai, opening Bombay Canteen, and his new SoHo restaurant is all about bread: specifically, the traditional Goan bread Cardoz grew up with. Everything from rosemary naan to the cheddar cheese-stuffed kulcha can be paired with a wide variety of chutneys. There’s also a large emphasis being placed on local produce and seafood, seen in dishes like roasted green chickpea chat and rice-flaked halibut. The absolute must-try item, though, is the “French fries” topped with coconut, garlic, and chilies.

Nathan Ma

Atoboy

Flatiron

The newest addition to NYC's ever-growing Korean food scene is a modern, banchan-style restaurant opened at the end last month by chef Jung Hyun Park (previously of Jungsik) and his wife Ellia Park (previously of Noreetuh). The family-style menu pulls from both seasonal American ingredients and traditional Korean flavors with a reasonable $36 tasting menu featuring rice and three seasonal small-plate dishes, like eggplant with snow crab, tomato, and lemon; mackerel with green chili; and pork jowl with barley, ssamjang, and romaine.

Cole Saladino/Thrillist

Lighthouse Outpost

Nolita

If SoHo lunch options were starting to feel a little stale, fret not -- Williamsburg darling Lighthouse has branched out with a SoHo outpost, with a tiny, 10-seat spot and a menu entirely made up of reasonably priced to-go items, from breakfast dishes like a hefty egg sandwich with nduja, or the spicy shakshuka with tahini, harissa, egg, and some of the best sourdough bread you’ll find in the city, to lunch options like gazpacho and a duck pita.

Courtesy of Eataly

Eataly Downtown

Financial District

Eataly’s second New York location is the perfect antidote to all that healthy eating you’ve been doing for the last three months: it’s all about bread! Specifically, loaves, focaccia, pizza alla pala (flatbread), pasticcini (pastries), Southern Italian-style pastas from upscale restaurant Osteria della Pace, and a fresh pasta counter in the market. Oprah is surely screaming right now. On top of all of that, there’s a hand-made mozzarella bar, an Italian coffee bar, a salad counter, a “university” for live food demos and tastings, a market with 10,000+ products, and more. But again, the bread.

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Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
1. BlackTail 22 Battery Place, New York, NY 10004 (Financial District)

From the team behind The Dead Rabbit, BlackTail is a bar inspired by Prohibition-era Cuba, when booze-seeking New Yorkers would head to the island via seaplanes with black-painted tails. Since the planes would fly over Pier A, the bar’s Pier A Harbor House is a fitting location -- though you’ll have to use your imagination a little if you’re hoping for the full luxury transit experience. The drink menu is all updated takes on classic mixed drinks from the 1920s-1950s (think highballs, sours, old-fashioneds, and punches), and the food is also a nod to the era.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
2. Casa Neta 40 East 20th Street, New York, NY 10003 (Flatiron)

Tacos and small plates, like queso fundido and a daily rotating ceviche, help soak up inevitable rounds upon rounds of drinks at this Flatiron Mexican joint, which offers over 120 agave-based spirits in a two-floor space covered in custom murals and other art. Opt for a classic margarita (with tequila or mezcal) or one of the inventive originals.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
3. Faun 606 Vanderbilt Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Faun is an Italian-inspired American restaurant from chef Brian Leth (previously of Vinegar Hill House), with a verdant outdoor garden and seasonal share plates. It has a no-tipping policy, so service is included in the menu prices.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
4. Do or Dive 1108 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11216 (Bed Stuy)

With a spray-painted “v” on top of the old sign, Bed-Stuy’s beloved Do or Dine space has effectively been reborn as Do or Dive, another neighborhood dive from the team behind Williamsburg bars Skinny Dennis, Rocka Rolla, and Lucky Dog. As with the other bars, you’ll find an eclectic mix of knickknacks here -- a jukebox, vintage TVs, a random shark hanging on the wall -- as well as everyone’s favorite frozen “coffee thing” (aka Uncle Willie's Frozen Coffee) and 32oz Budweisers on the cheap.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
5. The Last Word 31-30 Ditmars Blvd, Astoria, NY 11105 (Astoria)

Enter through a “hardware store” on Ditmars Boulevard and you’ll find yourself in The Last Word, a cocktail bar that appears to be the Queens version of Raines Law Room, complete with red velvet curtains, plush chairs, exposed brick, a tin ceiling. The similarities make sense, given that one of the owners was also behind the Chelsea speakeasy. And while New York is saturated with speakeasies, that fact is basically irrelevant when faced with drinks like the Fat Monk with pear-infused reposado, Hefeweizen syrup, egg whites, lemon, and orange bitters.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
6. Paowalla 195 Spring St, New York, NY 10012 (Soho)

From chef Floyd Cardoz (formerly of Tabla and North End Grill), Paowalla is an Indian restaurant that's all about bread: specifically, the traditional Goan bread Cardoz grew up with. Everything from rosemary naan to the cheddar cheese-stuffed kulcha can be paired with a wide variety of chutneys. The Soho restaurant also places a large emphasis on local produce and seafood, but the absolute must-try item is the "French fries" with coconut, garlic, and chilies.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
7. Atoboy 43 E 28th St, New York, NY 10016 (Flatiron)

Atoboy is a modern, banchan-style restaurant from Chef Junghyun Park (Jungsik) and his wife Ellia Park (Noreetuh). The family-style menu fuses seasonal American ingredients with traditional Korean flavors, as evidenced in the tasting menu (one of the more reasonably priced ones in New York) that features small plates that rotate around beef, pork, seafood, and vegetables.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
8. Lighthouse Outpost 241 Mulberry St, New York, 10012 (Nolita)

The Nolita offshoot of Williamsburg darling Lighthouse is a tiny, 10-seat spot with a menu entirely made up of reasonably priced to-go items, from breakfast dishes like a hefty egg sandwich and spicy shakshuka with house-made sourdough bread to lunch options like gazpacho and a duck pita.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
9. Eataly Downtown 150 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10007 (Financial District)

Eataly’s second New York location its all about carbs. Specifically, golden loaves of bread, focaccia, pizza alla pala (flatbread), pasticcini (pastries), Southern Italian-style pastas from upscale restaurant Osteria della Pace, and a fresh pasta counter in the market. On top of all of that, there’s a hand-made mozzarella bar, an Italian coffee bar, a salad counter, a “university” for live food demos and tastings, a market with 10,000+ products, and more.