Food & Drink

All the Best Deals During NYC Winter Restaurant Week

Published On 01/16/2017 Published On 01/16/2017
Freud
Freud | Katie Burton

Leuca

Williamsburg

Beloved pasta chef Andrew Carmellini’s newest project inside the William Vale hotel has probably been all over your food-loving Instagram feed since it opened last month. Now’s your chance to try it at a hefty discount. First courses will include tuna crudo or smoked beets, to be followed with homemade pastas, including malfadini with electric green rapini pesto and pine nuts, or black shells with locally sourced calamari and arugula.

Courtesy of Le Coq Rico

Le Coq Rico

Flatiron

The “bistro of beautiful birds” will be serving a restaurant week menu with offerings plucked from its regular menu -- meaning you’re getting the full Le Coq Rico experience rather than the recipe shortcuts that some restaurants attempt to pull off during Restaurant Week. First course options will include butternut squash veloutĂ© and chicken terrine, with the second course featuring the star of the restaurant: poultry. Entrees include a 110-day-aged quarter chicken and daily rotating plats du jour like macaroni au gratin with chicken morsels on Mondays and coq au vin with egg tagliatelle on Tuesdays. If you can, save room for dessert: The l'Ă®le flottante, a soft meringue with creĚ‚me anglaise, is just decadent enough to make you feel like you went all-out.

Danielle Adams

Riverpark

Murray Hill

Those keeping up with the current season of Top Chef can play judge by paying a visit to TV chef Tom Colicchio’s farm-to-table riverside eatery. During Restaurant Week, Riverpark’s lunch and dinner menus feature a wide range of options, including oysters on the half shell, baby lettuce salad, cavatelli with lamb bacon, spaghetti carbonara with smoked tuna and bottarga, and a range of entrees like roasted sea bass, maple-glazed duck breast, and braised lamb shank.

Cafe Boulud New York

Café Boulud

Upper East Side

Get dressed up for lunch at acclaimed chef Daniel Boulud’s Lyonnaise bistro, tucked among the brownstones and galleries of the Upper East Side. The daytime menu features sesame-crusted tuna, chilled corn soup, eggplant ravioli, Scottish salmon, pan-seared pork loin, blueberry pavlova, and other elegant options, all to be paired with $8 glasses of sommelier-selected wines.

Nobu New York

Nobu New York

Tribeca

A single-course lunch box at Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s flagship usually starts at $28, so while it’s not impossible to dine at Nobu for less than $40, you’re getting a lot more for your money during Restaurant Week. Visit the sceney sushi spot for a power lunch of sashimi salad or black cod miso (bring a friend to share both), followed by assorted sushi or a cooked entree and a choice of dessert.

Francisco Tonelli

ABC Kitchen

Union Square

Legendary chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s locally focused eatery has the meal you’ll want if you’re really trying to stick to your healthy 2017 resolutions. The lunch menu will include farro and chickpea soup, kale salad, a grilled portobello sandwich, and a seared chicken salad with quinoa and escarole. And to cancel out all that healthy eating, there’s a sundae made with salted caramel ice cream, candied peanuts and popcorn, whipped cream, and chocolate sauce for dessert.

Katie Burton

Freud

Greenwich Village

Both lunch and dinner will be served at this almost painfully cool Austrian restaurant, with hearty dishes that will help you bulk up for the next Polar Vortex. Lunch options will include country pate, curried squash soup, spaetzle with broccoli rabe and aged Gruyère, and wiener schnitzel with cucumber salad. Dinner will be just as hearty with chicken liver mousse, homemade tagliatelle with chestnut and fennel, and paprika-spiced chicken over Austrian gnocchi.

Felidia

Upper East Side

You probably know Lidia Bastianich from her countless TV appearances and her portrait on jars of tomato sauce. Her original 1980s Manhattan hangout, Felidia, stills serves some of the best pasta in the city, though the $90 tasting menu may make it a bit steep for most people. Visit for lunch during Restaurant Week, when the restaurant will serve seasonal Italian dishes including fusilli with broccoli pesto, Lidia’s Tortiglioni in bolognese, a branzino fillet with fennel, and more. If you’re in winter carb-loading mode -- this is Restaurant Two Weeks, after all -- additional pastas can be added to the tasting for $6 per person.

LDV Hospitality

American Cut

Midtown & Tribeca

With the bill after a steakhouse dinner nearing half the price of your rent, Restaurant Week is the most affordable time to get your New York meat fix. And there’s no better NYC steakhouse to visit during Restaurant Week than Marc Forgione’s modern American Cut. Bring a crew, so you can order everything and share -- options include runny yolk-tossed Caesar salad, Jim Brady oysters baked with Champagne and truffle, hanger steak, plank-roasted salmon, a choice of side and dessert. That’s four decadent courses for the price of three.

Neta

Neta

Greenwich Village

Skip your sad, overpriced but skimpy lunchtime bento box and head to Neta for a three-course sushi lunch that’s actually worth what you’re paying. Start with a selection of five pieces of sushi or your choice of roll, to be followed by a poke bowl or a sashimi bowl and green tea panna cotta for dessert.

Lincoln Ristorante

Lincoln Ristorante

Upper West Side

If dining near Lincoln Center is your idea of a New Yorker’s New York date night, head to this beloved pre-theater (or pre-Netflix... ) Sicilian spot. The Restaurant Week menu includes healthy-sounding Italian dishes ranging from appetizers like chickpea soup with ditalini and entrees like whole wheat pasta with San Marzano tomatoes, seafood stew with couscous in saffron broth, and braised lamb over fava bean puree.

Kefi

Kefi

Upper West Side

Michael Psilakis’ tasty ode to everything you love about Greek food (seafood! Feta! Dips! ) will be serving lunch and dinner. The menu features a mezze course and entrees like shrimp with orzo and feta, roasted lemon chicken with potatoes, and braised lamb shank over orzo. Gluten-free brown rice pasta will be available as an orzo substitute and Kefi’s beloved grilled octopus is also available for an extra charge of $3.

Courtesy of Vaucluse

Vaucluse

Upper East Side

This fancy French bistro helmed by Chef Michael White will try to tempt you into spending a bit more during Restaurant Week by offering supplementary appetizers (at an extra charge of $13-$18 per pop). But stick to the set menu and you’ll get away with an expensive-feeling lunch for $29. Options include Vaucluse’s beloved duck liver terrine or seafood sausage as an appetizer, followed by skate with lemon and capers or rigatoni with duck legs ragoût and the option of an orange cake or chocolate tart for dessert. Eight dollar wines and a special elderflower cocktail will also be served.

Salvation Taco

Salvation Taco

Murray Hill

April Bloomfield and Ken Friedman’s Mexican-inspired taqueria will be serving both lunch and brunch for just $29. Fill up on Chihuahua cheese and serrano empanadas, braised beef shank chili, chicken tinga tortas, beer-battered fish tacos, piña colada tres leches cake, and churros with chocolate. As you probably guessed, chips and guac are extra, but you won’t need it.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
1. Leuca 111 N 12th St, Brooklyn, NY 11249 (Williamsburg)

The centerpiece of Andrew Carmellini's culinary program at Williamsburg's William Vale hotel, Leuca offers a menu inspired by Southern Italian flavors. Expect comforting dishes like ricotta dip with hot honey & garlic, spaghetti tossed with sea urchin, and charred, wood-fired pizzas. The best end to any meal here comes in the "Sophia Loren for Two" sundae, made with espresso gelato, caramel, meringue, and rum granita. The two-room space, like the food, blends contemporary and traditional with wood-paneled walls, tiled floors, and contemporary black-and-white portraits.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
2. Salvation Taco 145 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016 (Murray Hill)

April Bloomfield's all-day restaurant in Midtown is doling out high-end Mexican street food plates in an insanely decorated space. The menu features plenty of traditional and inventive tacos, available three-per-order or as a more formal dinner, and shareable fusion plates like sticky rice tamale and meatballs with manchego cheese. The Murray Hill restaurant is a hit during the after-work hours, especially when the rooftop is open.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
3. Le Coq Rico 30 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003 (Flatiron)

Le Coq Rico is the sister restaurant to Michelin-starred Chef Antoine Westermann's Montmartre bistro of the same name. Like its Parisian predecessor, this upscale Flatiron spot focuses entirely on birds. Specifically whole birds, like rooster, hen, squab, duck, and guinea fowl, which are raised for 90-120 days -- longer than the industry standard. The result is noticeably tender and more flavorful than any other poultry you'll find in New York. While it's clear what the star is here, Le Coq Rico's fresh-baked breads and pastries at brunch are Paris-level good.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
4. Riverpark 450 E 29th St, New York, NY 10016 (Murray Hill)

One of the many culinary notches in celebrity chef Tom Colicchio's belt, Riverpark is an ode to waterfront dining on a secluded street in Kips Bay. Views of the East River aside, his refined American menu with global influences is reason enough to visit. Seafood and red meat feature prominently, with grilled lamb chops studded with pistachio and monkfish cloaked in bacon able to be preceded by elegantly plated pastas or starters like dill-spiked Arctic char crudo. A smoky take on the Manhattan, adding extra richness to a classic, is the star of the bar. There would be virtually no one on the nearby streets come evening, between Bellevue Hospital wards and an NYU medical center, if not for the draw of Riverpark. And its draws are multiform: the restaurant is complete with its own urban farm where many of the ingredients used are grown.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
5. Nobu 105 Hudson St, New York, NY 10013 (Tribeca)

From master chef Nobu Matsuhisa and Robert De Niro, this original location of Nobu opened in the 90s when Tribeca was still a burgeoning neighborhood and not yet the playground of well-bred preschoolers and Taylor Swift. Nobu has been an A-List restaurant from the start, serving Matsuhisa's signature Japanese fusion dishes like black cod miso and yellowtail sashimi with jalapeño. The David Rockwell-designed space has a ritzy zen-like feel with birch wood accents and a wall made of river stones.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
6. ABC Kitchen 35 E 18th St, New York, NY 10003 (Union Square)

Helmed by Jean-Georges Vongerichten, ABC Kitchen serves a locally sourced, ingredient-driven menu from its space within the ABC Carpet & Home department store. The menu, though not vegetarian in the slightest, feels healthy -- an impression that probably has to do with the abundance of vegetable dishes and the use of whole-wheat flour in lieu of bleached white in individual pizzas. Both lunch and dinner are exquisite here, but it's the former that draws the power-lunching masses from the nearby offices of Park Ave South.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
7. Felidia 243 E 58th St, New York, NY 10022 (Midtown)

Italian chef Lidia Bastianich gave people a sense for her tastes during episodes of PBS's Lidia's Italian Table , and now she feeds them at East Midtown's Felidia's. The dining room is formal and straightforward, all white tablecloths and red chairs, for meals that are just as formal. You should select something from the 'garden' or 'field' categories (toasted bread topped with spicy ricotta and anchovy or a raw artichoke salad) to precede a main from the 'sea' or 'land' sections (roasted octopus with pickled onion or roasted pork chop with soft polenta and a sunnyside-up egg). Pastas are famously delicate, something you'd expect from a chef who's friends with Mario Batali.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
8. The Members Dining Room at The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 5th Ave, New York, NY 10028 (Upper East Side)

Museum membership has its perks, and at The Met, access to the Members Dining Room is among them. It doesn't have the buzz of any of the trending spots downtown, but the stately dining room feels like an experience from a more formal era. Contemporary American fare is given French and European touches, from honey-glazed duck breast with hominy and hazelnut mole to grilled octopus topped with fennel and sumac, and brought to you on white tablecloths. Mostly, though, it's just nice to indulge in some garlic-herb escargots after an afternoon of art.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
9. Freud 506 Laguardia Pl, New York, NY 10012 (Greenwich Village)

Chef Eduard Frauneder of Edi & the Wolf and The Third Man is serving Austrian fare like onion tarte with Gruyere and onion gravy in the old Bruno Pasticceria location. The Greenwich Village space is modeled after early 20th century Viennese brasseries with wooden accents and marble cafe tables, and serves appropriately named cocktails like the aperol and prosecco Sigmund's Spritz. Aside from the aforementioned tarte, there's an equally pungent burger with Cheddar, onion jam, and crispy fennel, and a fantastic schnitzel.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
10. Neta 61 W 8th St, New York, NY 10011 (West Village)

There's a minimalist air to Neta in the West Village, which makes it all the easier to focus on the impeccable fresh flavors. Neta, which literally translates to "the fresh ingredients of sushi," is run by two former head chefs at New York sushi megahouse Masa -- and you can taste their experience (as well as see it in the prices). Daily omakase menus -- plates picked by the chef and eaten at a counter overlooking his work station -- are the ultimate indulgence. Otherwise, a la carte options will do: be it any of the small plates, a full sushi selection, or playful desserts like bay leaf-infused creme brûlée.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
11. Osteria Morini 218 Lafayette St, New York, NY 10012 (Soho)

From Michael White of Marea, Ai Fiori, and Vaucluse, this Soho restaurant specializes in Italian cuisine from the northern Emilia-Romagna region. Expect house-made pasta dishes like braised wild mushroom rigatoni, simply grilled meats, and cured meat and cheese plates. Osteria Morini's dinner is perfect for date night, while its brunch, featuring ricotta pancakes and frittatas alongside signature pastas, has all the cheese and carbs essential to curing a hangover. Cleanse your palate with a scoop (or three) of gelato.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
12. American Cut 363 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10013 (Tribeca)

Marc Forgione's American Cut might not be among the class of old-school New York steakhouses, but the swanky, Atlantic City-based restaurant is one of the best spots for wet- and dry-aged beef in the city. The menu is simple but sophisticated, featuring tableside-chopped caesar salad, tomahawk ribeye and porterhouse for two, and out-of-this-world Cracker Jack sundae for dessert. The interior is dark and sleek with Art Deco touches, exposed brick walls, and leather booths.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
13. Lincoln Ristorante 142 W 65th St, New York, NY 10023 (Upper West Side)

As only a restaurant on Lincoln Center's campus could be, Lincoln Restaurant is dramatic. The solo venture from Per Se's former chef du cuisine is housed in a glass-walled space with a sloping roof that is covered in walkable green grass. As artful as the acts staged at The Met Opera, some would say. Elegant Italian-inflected flavors are crafted in the open kitchen, from veal chop with Roman gnocchi to rare sirloin with black truffle sauce and bone marrow soufflé. Even modest dishes like eggplant Parmesan are loaded with impressive flavor. A carefully curated wine list, starring Italian vintages, is navigated for you by a knowledgeable staff. As after any grand performance, we're betting you'll shout encore.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
14. Kefi 505 Columbus Ave, New York, NY 10024 (Upper West Side)

Michael Psilakis's Kefi is the casual sister restaurant to the more upscale MP Taverna. The spot was a neighborhood success when it opened on 79th Street, inspiring Psilakis to upgrade to a larger, two-floor space on Columbus Ave. The Greek menu is approachable, featuring pita with tzatziki and taramosalata dips, mezze like grilled octopus and house-made Cypriot sausage, and protein-based entrées of grilled branzino and braised lamb shank.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
15. Vaucluse 100 E 63rd St, New York, NY 10065 (Upper East Side)

Vaucluse is Chef Michael White's venture into the upscale French brasserie format, a departure from the Italian fare he’s known for at Marea, Osteria Morini, and Ai Fiori. A pair of expensively appointed 80-seat dining rooms, decked out in creams and grays and connected by a lounge area, provide an attractive backdrop for mostly traditional takes on Gallic cuisine. White tablecloths and attentive service accompany mainstays like beef tartare, duck-pork terrine, seared scallops, and pork tenderloin -- if you don’t opt for a dish from the rotating cast of old favorites like boeuf Bourguignon.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
16. Café Boulud 20 E 76th St, New York, NY 10021 (Upper East Side)

The beautifully plated French dishes at this elegant Upper East Side bistro are signature Daniel Boulud. The menu is split into four mini menus, each of which are based around a specific theme: traditional French cooking, seasonal flavors, the farmer's market, and global cuisine. The space is upscale with white tablecloths and prices to match, and if you can't swing the dinnertime check, the lunch prix-fixe should do the trick.