Dramatically light your winter coat on fire and then dance among its ashes because spring is finally here! Or, hold onto it because it’ll probably hail tomorrow. Either way, winter is for all intents and purposes over, and to ring in spring, you’ve got these 10 excellent new spots in to check out -- from a hidden restaurant in the back of an East Village bar, to a Southern-themed bar inspired by a fictional town, to several new US outposts of international faves.


All of the restaurants on this list are now part of our ongoing quest to find this year's best new restaurants in America, and we're combing through every opening in every Thrillist city. Get involved on Instagram -- #BestRest2016 -- to let us know your picks and your favorite dishes at each of these new spots.

Jessica Nash

Covina

Flatiron

O Ya's Tim and Nancy Cushman’s latest venture, an American/Mediterranean restaurant inside the Park South Hotel, proudly displays Tim’s passion for pizza (classic pies, as well as modern takes like the housemade salsicia with roasted peppers, mozzarella, and San Marzano), but the rest of the menu is not to be ignored. Under small plates, pay particular attention to the Hungarian fry bread with house smoked salmon, kefir ranch, and herbs -- as airy as fried food can be, so much so that you almost won’t feel bad about eating it. On the meatier side of things is a half- or whole-roast chicken (clearly New York’s it-dish right now), lamb kofte skewers, and a chuck/wagyu blend burger with American cheese and special sauce.

Andrew Kist

Belle Shoals

Williamsburg

Inspired by a fictional town, this Southern-themed bar (complete with a Wurlitzer jukebox), which opened at the end of February, comes from the team behind Seamstress with another excellent cocktail menu from Pamela Wiznitzer -- get the Three Kings with cognac, port, lemon, and cava, and don’t pass up the Jimbo Shot, served in a shotgun shell. The food stands on its own as well, like the “Drugstore Burger,” which is way better than it needs to be, and the insane “Hell’s Bells”: fried oysters wrapped in Virginia ham with smoky aioli inside a crepe.

Christopher Villano

Indian Accent

Midtown West

Straight from New Delhi to the Parker Meridien is Chef Manish Mehrotra’s first international outpost of his acclaimed restaurant that focuses on family-style Indian food with global ingredients. It’s fine-dining for sure, but that doesn’t mean the food isn’t seriously authentic. Standout small plates include the sweet pickle ribs and duck chettinad, but there are also plenty of must-try mains like dal gosht and tamarind sea bass.

Vanessa Granda

dinnertable

East Village

Through the curtains in the very back of the Garret East, you’ll find a doorbell reading "press for food." Is the speakeasy trend a bit played out? Maybe -- but this one is from the guys who hid a bar above a Five Guys, so they know what they’re doing. Past the barn door is a space that’s at once cool and homey -- rap music blares from the speakers, and the walls are lined with lots of tile and plants. All dishes are meant to be shared and range from small (smoked short rib tartare and plump lemony dumplings) to larger (perfectly cooked sea bass; lasagna bolo for two; and the Sixth Guy's Burger, a nod to the team’s other spot). Be wise and order a lot. 

Courtesy of Antico Noè

Antico Noè

Midtown East

Iconic Florence panini shop, Antico Noè, has opened its first US outpost in Midtown, offering its most popular sandwiches (like the #4 with stuffed chicken, mushrooms, mozzarella, and rosé sauce; and the #9 with roasted turkey, onions, Brie, and spicy sauce). While all the different fillings are great, the homemade sauces and warm and crispy bread are reason enough to try these. Plus, you now have the perfect excuse to go to Florence, because, you know, you need to try both... for very important research.

Courtesy of TEISUI

Teisui

NoMad

Modeled after an intimate Japanese ryokan (a hotel or inn), Teisui is a cozy yet sleek spot, offering an impressive yakitori-heavy tasting menu that puts the grilled chicken skewers you order on Seamless to shame. The 10-course menu features all small dishes, each one beautifully executed by a team of Japanese chefs, like the yakitori chicken breast served with two flavorful sauces for dipping, miso-marinated rabbit breast and leg, and tsukune. Sit at the counter for the best view of the open kitchen.

Adrienne Grunwald

Rider

Williamsburg

The name of Chef Patrick Connolly new Williamsburg bistro is a nod to musicians' hospitality riders for shows, which is fitting, as the super-industrial restaurant is located in the same place as non profit music venue, National Sawdust. The food is all meant to be shared -- though we’d probably go with the menu’s note that “if you’d prefer to be selfish, it’s cool” too -- with lots of vegetable options alongside things like French dip with roasted bone marrow, soft egg with foie croutons and caviar, and a must-try off-menu cheeseburger.

Marcus Nilsson

Café Altro Paradiso

SoHo

Think of Café Altro Paradiso as Estela’s glammed-up sister with far more seating, dim lighting, and upscale interiors, including an impressive marble bar and marble floors. The Italian-focused menu also expands upon some of what Estela’s already mastered -- there are plenty of carefully executed small plates like carpaccio and seared octopus -- but there’s also a large emphasis on pasta here (order the lasagnette), as well as heartier mains like like chicken Milanese and ribeye.

Courtesy of Fair Weather Bushwick

Fair Weather Bushwick

Bushwick

This popular daytime coffee shop isn’t new, but this month it turned into a full-fledged restaurant, with Chef/Partner John Creger offering a 10-course tasting menu -- a pretty uncommon notion for this section of Wyckoff Ave. The 22-seat dining room is offering one weekday seating at 8pm, Tuesday-Thursday, with a rotating menu served by Creger (the opening menu featured deconstructed Cold Spring River clam chowder and Four Story Hill Farm pork belly). On Fridays and Saturdays, dinner is a la carte from 6-10:30pm, with the likes of quinoa fritters and short ribs with smoked gouda polenta.

Courtesy of Le Coq Rico

Le Coq Rico

Flatiron

Michelin-starred French Chef Antoine Westermann has brought his popular Montmartre bistro to New York, with a focus on American poultry (responsibly raised whole birds like rooster, hen, squab, duck, and guinea fowl) to be shared with a group. Unlike most restaurants, the poultry here is all raised for 90-120 days, and you can seriously taste the difference. Order the oldest ones -- the 110-day raised Brune Landaise and the 130-day Catskill guinea fowl -- for a true French chicken experience; both are perfectly tender and flavorful. While you’re obviously getting bird here, but don’t pass up the cream of chicken soup and sides like macaroni au gratin and thick-cut fries.

Sign up here for our daily NYC email and be the first to get all the food/drink/fun New York has to offer.

Lucy Meilus is Thrillist’s New York Editor. She's on a strict whole-bird diet. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
1. Covina 127 E 27th St, New York, NY (Flatiron)

Covina, an American/Mediterranean restaurant inside the Park South Hotel, proudly displays Chef Tim Cushman's passion for pizza (classic pies, as well as modern takes like a House made Salsicia with roasted peppers, mozzarella, and San Marzano), but the rest of the menu is not to be ignored. Small plates and meatier dishes are first in their class, and beautifully presented. Enjoy your food in their spacious dining room, or sit at the bar and sip on a cocktail before.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
2. Belle Shoals 10 Hope St, Brooklyn, NY 11211 (Williamsburg)

Inspired by the bluesy ideal of an invented Southern small town, this themed saloon comes from the team behind Seamstress, complete with a cocktail menu designed by Pamela Wiznitzer (who designed the program at Dead Rabbit). Try Three Kings with cognac, port, lemon, and cava, and don’t pass up the Jimbo Shot, served in a shotgun shell. Belle Shoals' comfort food stands on its own as well, with fried oyster po-boys and chicken-fried skate wing biscuit sandwiches to satisfy down-country cravings.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
3. Indian Accent Le Parker Meridian 123 W 56th St, New York, NY 10019 (Midtown West)

Straight from New Delhi to Le Parker Meridien is Chef Manish Mehrotra’s first international outpost of his acclaimed restaurant that specializes in so-called nouveau Indian. The fine-dining destination has both à la carte and tasting menus, and the food is a mix of authentic and fusion flavors. Signature dishes include sweet pickled ribs and stuffed kulcha, a wheat bread with fillings like butter chicken and wild mushrooms. In true New York fashion, the menu features one version of kulcha filled with pastrami and mustard butter.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
4. Dinnertable 206 Avenue A, New York, NY 10009 (East Village)

Through the curtains in the very back of the Garret East, you’ll find a doorbell reading "press for food." Is the speakeasy trend a bit played out? Maybe -- but this one is from the guys who hid a bar above a Five Guys, so they know what they’re doing. Past the barn door is a space that’s at once cool and homey -- rap music blares from the speakers, and the walls are lined with lots of tile and plants. All dishes are meant to be shared and range from small to large. Be wise and order a lot.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
5. Antico Noè 220 E 53rd St, New York, NY 10022 (Midtown East)

Iconic artisan Florence panini shop, Antico Noè, offers their most popular sandwiches at their first US outpost in Midtown. The warm and crispy Florentine bread is their secret to creating the perfect panini, with a golden crust and soft interior. Their layered ingredients- cured meats and cheeses, homemade sauces and fresh cold-pressed olive oils- will have you savoring every last bite.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
6. Teisui 246 5th Ave, New York, NY 10001 (Nomad)

Modeled after an intimate Japanese ryokan (a hotel or inn), Teisui is a cozy yet sleek spot, offering an impressive yakitori-heavy tasting menu that puts the grilled chicken skewers you order on Seamless to shame. The 10-course menu features all small dishes, each one beautifully executed by a team of Japanese chefs. Sit at the counter for the best view of the open kitchen.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
7. Rider 80 N 6th St, Brooklyn, NY 11249 (Williamsburg)

The name of Chef Patrick Connolly's Williamsburg bistro is a nod to musicians' hospitality riders for shows, which is fitting, as the super industrial restaurant is located in the same place as non profit music venue, National Sawdust. The food is all meant to be shared -- though we’d probably go with the menu’s direction that “if you’d prefer to be selfish, it’s cool” too -- with lots of vegetable options alongside the meat and fish dishes.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
8. Cafe Altro Paradiso 234 Spring St, New York, NY 10013 (Soho)

From the crazy-talented team behind Estela, Café Altro Paradiso in Soho is larger, grander, and glitzier than its Nolita sibling. The menu features house-made pasta (available in full or half orders), vegetable starters, and meat and seafood entrées, plus daily specials. The decor -- huge windows, high ceilings, marble accents -- matches the cuisine's modern Italian touch.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
9. Fair Weather Bushwick 274 Wyckoff Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11237 (Bushwick)

This popular daytime coffee shop turns into a full-fledged restaurant come dinner time. Chef/Partner John Creger offers a 10-course tasting menu -- a pretty uncommon notion for this section of Wyckoff Ave. The 22-seat dining room is offering one seating at 8pm, Tuesday-Thursday with a weekly-rotating menu, and on Fridays and Saturdays, dinner is a la carte from 6-10:30pm.

Previous Venue Next Venue Venue Description
10. Le Coq Rico 30 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003 (Flatiron)

Le Coq Rico is the sister restaurant to Michelin-starred Chef Antoine Westermann's Montmartre bistro of the same name. Like its Parisian predecessor, this upscale Flatiron spot focuses entirely on birds. Specifically whole birds, like rooster, hen, squab, duck, and guinea fowl, which are raised for 90-120 days -- longer than the industry standard. The result is noticeably tender and more flavorful than any other poultry you'll find in New York. While it's clear what the star is here, Le Coq Rico's fresh-baked breads and pastries at brunch are Paris-level good.

Clickbait