The 16 Best Steakhouses in NYC

As long as you don’t order it well done.

St. Anselm
St. Anselm | Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
St. Anselm | Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist

The steakhouse is as much of an NYC icon as the Statue of Liberty or the Empire State Building. And whether you’re celebrating a new job, a graduation, or have a milestone anniversary, a steak dinner has long been designated as a top special occasion meal for New Yorkers and considered the ultimate reward to any great accomplishment.

From time-honored classics to modern newcomers, here are the 16 best steakhouses in NYC.

Hawksmoor New York (Hawksmoor NYC)
Photo courtesy of Hawksmoor

Hawksmoor

Gramercy
$$$$

After Covid-19 caused an 18-month delay, this East London-based steakhouse originally founded in 2006 by co-owners and childhood friends Huw Gott and Will Beckett finally opened in Gramercy Park last fall. Located inside of the United Charities Building and in a space with 30-foot vaulted ceilings and mosaic flooring, Hawksmoor is known for their dry-aged steaks prepared over charcoal and includes signature orders like the Rib-eye or Prime Rib Chop with sauces like Bone Marrow Gravy, Anchovy Hollandaise, and Bayley Hazen Hollandaise. A special dedicated section of the craft cocktail menu features NYC-centric drinks like the Apple Martini with green apple acid and the Empire Sour with verjus.

Carne Mare
Carne Mare | Photo by Nicole Franzen

Carne Mare

Downtown Seaport
$$$$

On those days when you want to go big with a decadent meal—which we are all deserving of right now—head to Carne Mare. This two-story Italian steakhouse in Seaport opened last summer and is the latest restaurant from chef Andrew Carmellini and his NoHo Hospitality Group (Locanda Verde, Bar Primi, The Dutch). With a menu from chef de cuisine Brendan Scott (Lafayette), go for drinks or to eat solo at the ground floor dining room’s gorgeous horseshoe bar, or work your way up the grand spiral staircase to the second floor for banquettes and views of the East River. But no matter where you’re planted, prepare yourself for a full-throttle chophouse experience with an array of steaks and meat along with Italian specialties.

Gage & Tollner
Gage & Tollner | Photo by Lizzie Munro

Gage & Tollner

Downtown Brooklyn
$$$$

After an initial 13-month delay due to COVID-19, Gage & Tollner in Downtown Brooklyn made its highly anticipated debut last April. The legendary oyster and chop house’s origins date back to 1879, and its revival is brought to you by veteran restaurateurs Sohui Kim and Ben Schneider (the wife-and-husband duo behind The Good Fork and Insa), and St. John Frizell (Fort Defiance). Inside a space that stuns with Gilded Age glory, use an evening here as a reason to get dressed up for a night out and prepare for some prime people-watching of your fellow diners within the intimate dining room—all the while enjoying a menu of seafood platters, steaks, and much more. And check out the restaurant’s recently opened tropical-themed bar upstairs, Sunken Harbor Club, which contains no windows to the outside world to transport visitors to the ocean floor.

American Cut
Photo courtesy of American Cut

American Cut

Tribeca
$$$$

Even as it satisfies a craving for tradition, this massive Tribeca destination from LDV Hospitality brings a modern take to the classic steakhouse formula. In addition to the sleek main dining room, American Cut offers seating in the semi-private Dining Lounge, lower-level Morrison Room, or The Black Room for some privacy with your party while enjoying porthouse, filet mignon, or Miyazaki Wagyu with accompaniments like Jack Daniels Onions, bone marrow, or the signature Chili Lobster. Sides also have a twist, like Jalapeño Mashed Potatoes, Sunchoked Spinach with fontina cheese, and Maitake Hen of the Woods mushrooms with lime and soy sauce—a major upgrade from the traditional sauteed button mushrooms on old school steakhouse menus.

Bowery Meat Company

East Village
$$$$

This ode to meat by restaurateur John McDonald has attracted its initial share of celebs and acclaim when it opened in 2014. And since then, Bowery Meat Company is known as a prime example of the type of modern steakhouse New Yorkers need as much as the old school classics. Its Duck Lasagna has become legendary but its long list of prime cuts (including several massive steaks for two like Chateaubriand and 100 Day Dry Aged Double NY Strip), is as impressive as it is tasty.

Cote
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist

Cote

Flatiron District
$$$$

When Simon Kim opened this Korean temple to beef in 2017, it brought a new kind of steakhouse to the city, and New Yorkers couldn’t be happier. The quality of the meat here puts it leagues above other restaurants, and The Butcher’s Feast comes with four specialty cuts including hanger steak, dry-aged ribeye, and marinated kalbi, plus a slew of banchan, an egg souffle, and stews. And if it’s your first time, be sure to slip downstairs to peep the moody meat aging room.

Gallaghers Steakhouse

Times Square
$$$$

Ever since 1927 when it opened as a speakeasy, Gallaghers has been serving thirsty and hungry Times Square visitors and workers alike. Although it has gone through several owners and rebrandings through the years, it has remained one of Manhattan’s legendary steakhouses. Porterhouse, ribeye, bone-in sirloin, and veal chops accompanied by shrimp, lobster, or crab cocktail and clams casino—it doesn’t get any more classic than this.

Keens Steakhouse
Photo courtesy of Keens Steakhouse

Keens Steakhouse

Midtown West
$$$$

A legendary NYC steakhouse, Keens has been in Herald Square since 1885 and was recognized by the James Beard Foundation in 2013 with an America’s Classics Award. Famous for its Legendary Mutton Chop, the menu also includes steaks like a prime rib, porterhouse, chateaubriand, T-bone, sirloin, and a classic surf and turf with Maine lobster and filet mignon. A robust raw bar, Maryland Lump Crab Cakes, and veggies like Iceberg Lettuce Wedges, Keens’s Creamed Spinach, and potatoes in five forms all helped carve out the classic steakhouse menu.

Old Homestead Steakhouse

Meatpacking District
$$$$

Another old timer that’s stood the test of time, Old Homestead has been in the Meatpacking District since 1868, making it one of the country’s oldest restaurants. Exposed brick, leather banquettes, and 13 different cuts and sizes of steak, including Japanese A5+ Wagyu, create the complete steakhouse experience. Add on the Old Homestead Caesar salad, fresh oysters, and a Colossal Crab Cake if you can squeeze anything else in.

Peter Luger Steak House

Williamsburg
$$$$

This Brooklyn institution has been the subject of glowing reviews and no-holds-barred takedowns through the 135 years it has been open, but it’s undeniably a NYC classic and no steakhouse list is complete without it. And while Peter Luger can be inconsistent, doesn’t take credit cards (we know, they started taking debit cards but it’s not the same thing), and can seem overpriced, it’s still one of the most legendary dining experiences and steakhouses in NYC—and its porterhouse, Luger Burger, and ice cream sundae are still must eats.

Porter House
Photo by Noah Fecks

Porter House

Columbus Circle
$$$$

Chef/partner Michael Lomonaco's Porter House Bar and Grill has been a go-to destination for prime-aged, hormone-free steaks in NYC since it opened inside The Shops at Columbus Circle in 2006. Lomonaco sources USDA prime beef from the inimitable Pat LaFrieda, who ages the steaks between 21 and 60 days. Those steaks show up in classic dishes like the Porterhouse for two, the Cowboy Rib Steak with garlic confit and arugula, and the Skirt Steak with peppercorn sauce. If looking to splurge, you’ll also find a selection of American wagyu beef from Idaho's Snake River Farms. The sauce selection is key here, with dips like XO Cognac Peppercorn, Cabernet shallot, and a classic Béarnaise. Go big with a side of Buttermilk Onion Rings, Black Truffle Mashed Potatoes, or Creamed Spinach Mr. Pete’s Way (aka with bacon) and you’ll have a memorable extravagant steakhouse meal.

Quality Eats
Photo courtesy of Quality Eats

Quality Eats

West Village
$$$$

Executive chef Craig Koketsu offers a modern interpretation of familiar steakhouse dishes at this meat-centric spot with locations in the West Village and Upper East Side. At Quality Eats, off-cut steaks are showcased alongside items like Grilled Octopus with salsa verde and starters and sides like the Our Wedge salad with candied bacon and habanero dressing; Corn Creme Brulee; and Cacio e Pepe Orzo. The signature Don Amache Filet, where slices of filet mignon rest atop toast spread with chicken liver mousse, represents the kitchen’s philosophy in a single dish: top quality but underrepresented meats perfectly cooked and creatively presented. Pair everything with signature cocktails like the Cracker Jack Old Fashioned with infused rye or Hemingway Spritz with fresh grapefruit.

St. Anselm
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist

St. Anselm

Williamsburg
$$$$

Williamsburg’s other steakhouse is much less famous than Peter Luger, but it might actually be better. The humble and intimate exposed brick and wood space is welcoming and comfy, while the menu boasts new takes on comfort food of the meaty variety, with dishes like Piedmontese Ax Handle Rib Eye; New York Strip au poivre; Sweet Tea Brined Bobo Chicken; and a Bourbon Brined Pork Porterhouse. Vegetables are expertly prepared with options like Pan-Fried Mash Potatoes, Broccoli with Ranch, and Long Beans w/ Garlic Butter. For dessert, the signature Vanilla Ice Cream Sundae has brandied cherries, caramel, and cacao nibs.

Sparks Steak House

Midtown East
$$$$

Beloved for its place in mob lore as much as its food (Gambino family mobster Paul “Big Paul” Castellano was killed here in 1985), the Cetta brothers’ famous steakhouse has been going strong since 1966, when it originally started as a pub but soon morphed into the steakhouse it is today. Interiors at Sparks are old school with dark wood, coffered ceilings, and landscape paintings adorning the walls. But once you devour the signature Prime Sirloin Steak (a larger portion for the price than other spots), complemented by a bottle from their venerable wine cellar, you’ll simply consider yourself at a stellar NYC restaurant having a great meal.

Strip House

Union Square
$$$$

Strip House is where you go when you need something a little more modern, a little sexier, and a little swankier, making it perfect for a date (rather than a business meeting). Thankfully, it’s not only about the vibe at the David Rockwell-designed downtown location (with an additional Midtown spot). Request the bone-in New York Strip or the Dry Aged Ribeye and you’ll be more than happy. To put yourself over the edge though, add the black truffle creamed spinach.

4 Charles Prime Rib
Photo courtesy of 4 Charles Prime Rib

4 Charles Prime Rib

West Village
$$$$

From the team behind Chicago’s famous Au Cheval, 4 Charles Prime Rib is more supper club than classic steakhouse, which is just fine with us. The posh, clubby underground spot in the West Village with wood-paneled walls, crystal chandeliers, and brown leather chairs is always hard to nab a table at. But if you manage to do so, there are three different cuts of prime rib to choose from—English Cut, Chicago Cut, and the 4 Charles Cut—and you’ll definitely want a side of the Creamed Spinach and the Truffle Mac & Cheese. And while it’s not the Au Cheval burger, the 10oz Double Wagyu Cheeseburger here is still a must-order. Plus, the Chocolate Cream Pie is a show stopper.

Tae Yoon was born and raised in Queens, and is the Editor of Thrillist New York.
Devorah Lev-Tov is a contributor for Thrillist.