You already memorized the best ramen places in the Bay Area, but what happens when you're not in, uh, San Jose? Or the closest bowl of slurpy wonderment is a 40-minute Muni ride away and Uber is surge pricing because... Uber is always surge pricing? WHAT THEN, HUH?? Well, this then: here's where to find the best bowls of ramen in EIGHTEEN different SF neighborhoods.

Trevor Felch/Thrillist

Bernal Heights

Coco's Ramen (address and info)

What you’re getting: Curry ramen
Coco’s is a discreet, speakeasy-ish spot right along the bustling chaos of Mission St in the ambiguous Outer Mission-Bernal Heights-La Lengua corridor, also known as the Safeway Area. The normal types of ramen are present and worth your time, but be bold. It’s all about the seafood ramen or the curry ramen. The former is kind of a pig stew-meets-clam chowder deal and the latter really hums when you ask for it hot. Really hot.
 

Castro

Slurp Noodle Bar (address and info)

What you're getting: Slurp! Ramen
Not only is Slurp the Castro’s best ramen by leaps and bounds, it’s got to be the only “International Noodle Bar” in the entire city. Slurp that ramen and appreciate how, slowly, the Castro’s dining choices are beginning to diversify.

Flickr/Tammy Loh

Duboce Triangle

Orenchi Beyond (address and info)

What you're getting: Orenchi Ramen
Ye olde days (pre-2015 opening of Orenchi Beyond) went something like this: 1hr drive to Santa Clara, 2-3hr wait for the best ramen in the Bay Area at older sister Orenchi, 1hr drive back to SF. Now? We’ve got our own! It truly is tonkotsu perfection, somehow porkier than all the other bowls on this list.

Kirimachi Ramen

Embarcadero

Kirimachi Ramen (address and info)

What you're getting: Tonkotsu ramen (and uni risotto)
The former under-the-radar North Beach favorite is now in spiffier digs inside Embarcadero Center. Uni risotto, superlative ramen, and validated parking combine to save you from the crush of shoppers and weekday suits at the Ferry Building.
 

FiDi

Ramen Underground (address and info)

What you're getting: Tomato ramen with boiled egg and chashu
A dozen hungry corporate banker bees MAX can cram into this smaller-than-a-beehive room for lunch, and oh is it worth the squeeze. Do note the spicy cold sesame ramen, and also that the BBQ pork “chashu” here could be served at a Memphis smokehouse. What lifts Ramen Underground way above its peers is the uniquely customizable menu. You want habañero with that miso broth? Boom. A tomato-based broth that’s like spaghetti’s ramen offspring? Uh-huh.

Trevor Felch/Thrillist

Glen Park

Tataki Canyon (address and info)

What you're getting: Tonkotsu ramen
Sleepy by day, sleepy at night, bursting at the seams hectic during both rush hours, Glen Park is basically a small suburban village that's somehow still part of the big city. Tataki, as it name suggests, is all about responsibly caught, sustainable sushi, but it also does excellent ramen. While most on this list consider atmosphere unnecessary for drinking and ramen, this is easily one of the most serene, civilized ambiances in which you may ever eat a bowl.
 

Hayes Valley

Nojo (address and info)

What you're getting: Nojo Ramen with confit grilled chicken
This intricate, thoughtful ramen is part of the reason Hayes Valley rents are going up. Maybe. Being a yakitori place at night, the chicken theme comes naturally to the ramen, along with a complex-sounding confit grilled chicken breast garnish. Sadly, the ramen can only be found during Sunday brunch. That’s a bummer for what is easily the best in the 'hood and maybe the whole city.

Trevor Felch/Thrillist

Ingleside

21 Taste House (address and info)

What you're getting: Honey pork belly ramen
Pick a ramen. Any ramen. No, really -- you’ve got over 20 to choose from. There’s the heart attack in a bowl cheese tonkotsu ramen, a seafood ramen, and an entire category devoted to cold ramens.

Men Oh Tokushima Ramen

Inner Richmond

Men Oh Tokushima (address and info)

What you're getting: Tokushima Ramen
Look, ramen is ultimately about pork. And being a pork expert (addict?), you’re fully aware that Kurobuta pork is basically the holy pig breed grail. It’s the swine equivalent of caviar or kobe beef. Tokushima is a city on Southeast Japan’s island of Shikoku and happens to be both home to some of the world’s best Kurobuta pigs and home of this small international ramen chain, responsible for that soft, fatty, stir-fried Kurobuta pork belly in your bowl.

Izakaya Sozai

Inner Sunset

Izakaya Sozai (address and info)

What you're getting: Ritsu Tonkotsu Ramen with braised pork belly
Every other restaurant opening in town these days calls itself an “izakaya” but Sozai was an original years ago and is the real thing. It's got late-night eats like fried cheese or yakitori skewers of every chicken part ever named, but there’s also a formality here -- no eating ramen until the snacks are done and the sake finished.

Waraku

Lower Pacific Heights

Waraku (address and info)

What you're getting: Tsukemen
Being the premier ramen purveyor in Japantown is, well, damn near impossible. Talk about competition and lofty expectations. Waraku is the closest you'll come. Humble and a stalwart example of what it does, there are only three ramens at Waraku (no miso) with one being tsukemen, which kind of is and kind of isn’t ramen, since you actually dip the naked noodles into broth. Get it anyway.

Chotto

Marina

Chotto (address and info)

What you're getting: Karamiso tonkotsu ramen
What better way to fuel that Crissy Field run than a bowl of awesome tonkotsu? I guess maybe some kale? Annnnnyway Chotto is the move in the Marina. Yes, even though it's an izakaya better known for its kushiyaki (chicken skewers).

Ramen Izakaya Goku

The Mission

Ramen Izakaya Goku (address and info)

What you're getting: Veggie miso potage ramen
After soaking up too many rays of sun and enjoying a few “refreshments” on a lovely afternoon at Dolores Park, make the one-minute stroll and step into the blinding darkness of Goku. The term Goku means “hella” according to the menu. The spicy tonkotsu is where you'll want to direct your attention if you're a meat eater, while the cauliflower and mushroom-based veggie ramen is the city’s best ramen bowl for plant eaters.
 

North Beach

Mura Lounge (address and info)

What you're getting: Japanese-style chashu ramen
Your itinerary of bars and strip clubs and such is up to you. Just please, PLEASE don’t fall into the touristy, overpriced Italian food trap on Columbus. Don’t do it, you know better. This is ramen that could hold its own in the epic San Mateo ramen battles, which is weird because IT'S IN LITTLE ITALY.

Flickr/queenkv

Outer Richmond

Miki (address and info)

What you’re getting: Tonkotsu miso ramen
Way out in the avenues, Miki is a tucked-away Japanese spot mostly known only to nearby residents. Ramen is just part of the experience (excellent sushi, soba, list goes on...) and the usual ramen suspects are hits, plus it's got the highest population of chicken broth ramens anywhere -- definitely the place to hit up after getting cultured at the Legion of Honor.
 

Outer Sunset

Saiwaii Ramen (address and info)

What you're getting: Spicy garlic miso ramen
Maybe you just went surfing, bro. Or pretended to be in the Netherlands walking around the Golden Gate Park windmills. Whatever it is that brings you to these parts, you’re cold and the only thing that's going to warm you up is spicy garlic ramen. Saiwaii comes through in the clutch with exactly that, and it's always on the mark (as is the salmon skin salad).

Flickr/Gary Stevens

Tendernob

FujiYoshi Ramen (address and info)

What you're getting: Tonkotsu kotteri ramen 
There are pop-ups within restaurants. There are pop-ups that move out and find their own brick and mortar space. And then there is the curious case of FujiYoshi, formerly a pop-up inside Kyu Sushi that gobbled up Kyu and now is simply known as FujiYoshi (same owners). Got it? Formalities over, now choose between normal thin noodles or curvy, thicker “Tokyo-style noodles.” Opt for the ultra-thick and creamy kotteri tonkotsu broth -- it literally tastes like melted foie gras.

Flickr/Stuart Spivack

Union Square

Katana-Ya (address and info)

What you're getting: Katana-Ya Ramen with corn, potstickers, fried chicken, and BBQ pork
The only ramen address where Lonely Planet-toting tourists and savvy locals line up with each other, Katana-Ya served the masses long before ramen was cool. Really -- it was even a destination before Asian fusion cuisine ripped apart the '90s. It’s old school, it's crowded, it's an essential enough San Francisco institution that it's worth the line and questions about how far away Coit Tower is.

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Trevor Felch is a restaurants writer for SF Weekly and contributing editor for Vino 24/7. He is one of a select few theater actors who has played both Zeus and the Marquis de Sade. Follow him on Twitter @TrevorFelch.

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1. Coco's Ramen 3319 Mission St, San Francisco, CA 94110 (Bernal Heights)

Discreetly tucked away along the bustling chaos of Mission St, Coco's is a snug wood-paneled noodle hideaway that excels at all your standard ramen varieties like Tonkotsu, but branching out has its rewards. Of particular note are the seafood ramen in which a pork stock parties with shrimp, squid, and mussels, and the curry ramen, which particularly shines when ordered extra hot (if you can handle that sort of thing).

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2. Slurp Noodle Bar 469 Castro St, San Francisco, CA 94114 (The Castro)

Slurp Noodle Bar in the Castro is a laid-back restaurant that serves up noodle dishes (and more) from all over Asia. Burmese, Chinese, Filipino, Thai, and Vietnamese dishes come together on a thorough and enticing menu. It’s got the best ramen in the Castro, complimentary banchan, and delicious steamed pork belly buns.

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3. Orenchi Beyond 174 Valencia St, San Francisco, CA 94103 (Duboce Triangle)

Ramen connoisseurs line up around the block for bowls of milky pork based Tonkotsu ramen at this Valencia St. noodle shop. The two main dishes "Orenchi" and "Beyond" feature springy, thick cut noodles swimming in Tonkotsu soup. The Beyond is a garlicky and studded with pieces of pork belly; the Orenchi broth, lighter and saltier than the Beyond, comes with a perfectly soft boiled egg. Crispy, spicy karaage and the citrus-infused "Beyond" salad are also worth checking out. A playlist of '70s hip-hop and R&B set the scene and supplement Orenchi's modern, minimalist decor.

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4. Kirimachi Ramen 3 Embarcadero Ctr, San Francisco, CA 94111 (Embarcadero)

The former under-the-radar North Beach favorite is now in spiffier digs inside Embarcadero Center. Superlative ramen and validated parking combine to save you from the crush of shoppers and weekday suits at the Ferry Building. But don’t miss the sleeper hit, uni risotto, which seamlessly marries the flavors of Italy and Japan with sea urchin, shiitake mushrooms, and parmesan.

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5. Ramen Underground 355 Kearny St, San Francisco, CA 94108 (Financial District)

This hole-in-the-wall FiDi ramen spot attracts the suited workers for lunch (thanks to its customizable menu and slurpable noodles), but once the sun goes down, hipsters and professionals alike line up to get a taste. You’ll find the usual delectable tonkotsu and chicken broth, plus unexpected habanero, soy milk, spicy cold sesame, and tomato broths. Arrive early to put your name on the list, since the small space only holds room for a few.

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6. Tataki Canyon 678 Chenery St, San Francisco, CA 94131 (Glen Park)

Tataki, as it name suggests, is all about responsibly caught, sustainable sushi, but it also does excellent ramen. While most on this list consider atmosphere unnecessary for drinking and ramen, this is easily one of the most serene, civilized ambiances in which you may ever eat a bowl.

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7. Nojo 231 Franklin St, San Francisco, CA 94102 (Hayes Valley)

Instead of tonkotsu pork broth, this ramen tavern in Hayes Valley serves paitan broth, a rich and milky broth made with chicken. Nojo's menu features five kinds of ramen with additional toppings like meatballs and a poached egg. There are also izakaya-style small bites like hand-made gyoza and teriyaki chicken buns, plus sake, shochu, wine, and beer.

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8. 21 Taste House 1109 Ocean Ave, San Francisco, CA 94112

21 Taste House has over 20 ramen options to choose from: there’s the heart-attack-in-a-bowl cheese tonkotsu ramen, a seafood ramen, and an entire category devoted to cold ramens.

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9. Men Oh Tokushima 5120 Geary Blvd, San Francisco, CA 94118 (Inner Richmond)

With twelve locations in Japan, this Inner Richmond ramen spot, which makes its noodles in-house, won’t disappoint purists. The chain is based in Tokushima, Japan, which is home to the world's best Korubuta pig (the swine equivalent of kobe beef), and a salty stir-fried Korubuta pork belly slice lands in each bowl (along with chashu, seaweed, bamboo, and all the usual suspects).

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10. Izakaya Sozai 1500 Irving St, San Francisco, 94122 (The Sunset)

Inner Sunset's Sozai is one of San Francisco's original izakayas. It specializes in yakitori chicken skewers; fried tofu, oysters, and chicken wings; and grilled fish dishes. Its extensive sake collection includes Junmai, Ginjo, Daiginjo, and Nijori varieties. Sozai serves tonkotsu ramen too, but according to house rules, you can't have it until you're at least one round of sake in.

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11. Waraku 1638 Post St, San Francisco, CA 94115 (Japantown)

For a more upscale ramen experience in Japantown, Waraku is your spot. Bring a date and enjoy the refined atmosphere (dark wood tables and romantic lighting), and a menu full of delicacies. Pro tip: Snag yourself some tsukemen, a deconstructed ramen where you dip your noodles and toppings into a separate bowl of broth.

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12. Chotto 3317 Steiner St, San Francisco, 94123 (The Marina)

White tiled walls, wood accents, and brightly colored lanterns usher izakaya seekers into the Marina’s Japanese hotspot Chotto. The sleek metal counter space allows diners to marvel over the sushi chefs’ skills or watch as their bacon wrapped mochi is masterfully crafted. The kushiyaki and tonkotsu ramen aren't half bad, either.

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13. Ramen Izakaya Goku 3232 16th St, San Francisco, CA 94103 (The Mission)

From the team responsible for Men Oh Ramen, Shabuway, and Waraku comes, you guessed it, another ramen spot for your slurping pleasure. These guys obviously have the rich soup game down, so it’s no wonder that the spicy tonkotsu is one of our favorite bowls in the Mission. You can also find izakaya here, so save room for lots of fried seafood small plates (like octopus balls and squid legs), monkfish liver, and hamachi sashimi and wash it all down with a nice cold Sapporo.

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14. Mura Lounge 450 Broadway St, San Francisco, CA 94111 (North Beach)

Nestled among the touristy food traps of Little Italy is this epic ramen shop. Mura Lounge serves quality noodle soups and gyoza, and the chashu ramen, made with tender, melt-in-your-mouth braised pork belly, goes down as one of the best bowls in the city.

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15. Miki 3639 Balboa St, San Francisco, CA 94121 (The Richmond)

This unassuming, tucked-away slurp shot in Outer Richmond doles out a number of ramen varieties alongside curries, donburi, udon, and soba. Menu highlights include the tonkotsu garlic miso ramen, deep-fried chicken karaage, and onion cream croquette. A wood-paneled interior and paper lantern-lined walls create the perfect vibe to enjoy Miki's authentic, Japanese menu.

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16. Saiwaii Ramen 2240 Irving St, San Francisco, CA 94122 (Outer Sunset)

Maybe you just went surfing, bro. Or pretended to be in the Netherlands walking around the Golden Gate Park windmills. Whatever it is that brings you to these parts, you’re cold and the only thing that's going to warm you up is spicy garlic ramen. Saiwaii comes through in the clutch with exactly that, and it's always on the mark (as is the salmon skin salad).

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17. FujiYoshi 639 Post St, San Francisco, CA 94109 (The Tenderloin)

There are pop-ups within restaurants. There are pop-ups that move out and find their own brick and mortar space. And then there is the curious case of FujiYoshi, formerly a pop-up inside Kyu Sushi that gobbled up Kyu and now is simply known as FujiYoshi (same owners). Got it? Formalities over, now choose between normal thin noodles or curvy, thicker “Tokyo-style noodles.” Opt for the ultra-thick and creamy kotteri tonkotsu broth -- it literally tastes like melted foie gras.

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18. Katana-Ya 430 Geary St, San Francisco, CA 94102 (Union Square)

The only ramen address where Lonely Planet-toting tourists and savvy locals line up with each other, Katana-Ya served the masses long before ramen was cool. Really -- it was even a destination before Asian fusion cuisine ripped apart the '90s. It’s old school, it's crowded, it's an essential enough San Francisco institution that it's worth the line and questions about how far away Coit Tower is.

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