Everywhere You Need to Eat in San Francisco Right Now

From the Marina to the Mission, SF’s best new restaurants range from new pizza shops to the revival of a classic Cal-Italian restaurant, a Vietnamese bistro, and more.

Bodega SF
Bodega SF | Photo by Erin Ng
Bodega SF | Photo by Erin Ng

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: San Francisco’s restaurant industry does not quit. The openings just keep on coming, each one a testament to the care and creativity of the chefs, sommeliers, and bartenders that makes this city great. From the grand return of old favorites to pizza worth planning around, these new openings are quickly becoming go-to favorites, spanning the Marina to the Mission and beyond.

Be mindful that the industry is still struggling with staffing shortages and supply chain issues. We urge you to be kind and respectful to restaurant staff who have been through hell and back over the last couple of years (and please, tip very generously).

These 20 restaurants, all of which opened in 2022, continue to prove how essential this industry is to our city, and how joyful it can be. Do yourself a favor and start booking those reservations ASAP.

Delfina
Delfina | Photo by Albert Law

Delfina

Mission
$$$$

Often credited with spurring the Mission’s restaurant revival, Craig and Annie Stoll’s Delfina has been holding court on 18th Street since 1998, providing a bastion of flavor-forward Cal-Italian fare while spawning a veritable pizza empire around the Bay. So the reopening of O.G. Delfina, following a pandemic-spurred closure and a major renovation, is very, very good news, to say the least. The new, improved, larger space has combined the original Delfina with Pizzeria Delfina (which was previously next door), added a shop component and a parklet, making room for 115 seats, all of which are fine places to enjoy the seasonal, regularly changing menu of house-made pastas, wood-grilled mains, and yes, pizza, plus fresh-baked focaccia, all of which showcase produce from the Stolls’ farm in Sonoma. Delfina now boasts a full bar, making it a fine place to stop by for Aperitivo Hour on weeknights from 5 - 6 pm for a spritz and some Cacio e Pepe Potato Chips.
How to book: Reservations are available via OpenTable.

Rosemary & Pine
Photo by Joe Weaver

Rosemary & Pine

The Design District
$$$$

A new project from the Omakase Restaurant Group (Niku Steakhouse, Dumpling Time, Omakase), Rosemary & Pine is a more casual sister restaurant to special-occasion stunner Niku. The two restaurants also share executive chef Dustin Falcon who, before earning Niku a Michelin star, was a sous chef at Lazy Bear. Rosemary & Pine’s warm, light-filled, indoor-outdoor space is a fine place for a leisurely brunch, lunch, or dinner, with menus featuring fresh-baked bread, slow-braised meats, fresh seafood, and a whole slate of dishes cooked in the wood-fired oven.
How to book: Reservations are available via OpenTable.

Outta Sight

Civic Center
$$$$

Chef Eric Ehler’s Outta Sight pizza pop-up at Fig & Thistle wine bar quickly became one of our favorite pies in the city, so we were delighted to hear that he was opening a standalone slice shop with his business partner Peter Dorrance. The bright, simple spot, decked out with colorful artwork from their friends, is a perfect spot to grab a big, crisp-bottomed slice of ‘za, with options ranging from classic cheese and pepperoni to mushroom (loaded with cremini, shitake, and king trumpets) and the #50 topped with cheese and pineapple. You can get whole pies, too, save the Lunch Lady, which is only available by the square slice and is topped with vodka sauce and three cheeses. Keep an eye on Instagram for daily specials.
How to order: Call 415-829-3108 to order, or order in-person.

Marlena
Marlena | Photo by Tara Rudolph

Marlena

Bernal Heights
$$$$

Opening a restaurant in August 2020 is a feat unto itself. Opening a restaurant in August 2020 as a takeout-only operation, pivoting to full-service, and instantly winning a Michelin star is a whole different kind of magic, one that you’ll find on display at Marlena. Now, the husband-and-wife team of chefs David Fisher and Serena Chow Fisher have reopened Marlena after taking a beat and completing a full remodel of the 110-year-old Edwardian building that houses the restaurant. The cozy but sophisticated 34-seat space (plus a 24-seat parklet hugging Precita Park) feels like going to a dinner party at a friend’s house—if that friend has undeniably impeccable taste. Regardless, it’s well suited to Marlena’s seasonal, daily-changing $65 four-course prix-fixe menu where you might encounter dishes like fresh Tagliatelle served with beef shoulder sugo and chanterelle mushrooms or a Kabocha Squash Cheesecake.
How to book: Reservations are available via Resy.

Bar Agricole
Photo courtesy of Bar Agricole

Bar Agricole

SoMa
$$$$

Thad Volger’s temple to single-origin, grower-produced spirits, Bar Agricole has returned in the form of an intimate tasting room showcasing standout examples of farm-to-bottle drinking. Centered around a hand-cut ice bar, the 34-seat space is all warm woods and glowing lighting, with cozy booths for sipping cocktails, like a classic Ti’ Punch or side-by-side Old Fashioneds, each featuring bourbon from a separate cask, or sampling Bar Agricole’s own exclusive line of spirits. Whatever you’re sipping, pair it with a menu of seasonal fare (that’s sourced as intentionally as the drinks) from Bar Agricole chef Will Napoli in collaboration with chef Nick Balla. While well worth a lengthy visit for a full dinner, don’t sleep on Bar Agricole’s happy hour from 5 - 6 pm where you’ll find a fine selection of snacks and $8 cocktails.
How to book: Reservations are available via Tock.

Bodega SF
Bodega SF | Photo by Erin Ng

Bodega SF

Tenderloin
$$$$

Matthew Ho’s Bodega SF is the latest iteration of a family tradition—from 2003 to 2017, his family’s Bodega Bistro was a destination for Northern Vietnamese food in the Tenderloin. Ho carried the torch with Bodega pop-ups in 2019 and meal kits during the pandemic, leading to the opening of Bodega SF. The space, with intimate booths and communal high-top tables, is well suited to a variety of experiences, from tucking into pho at lunchtime or feasting on Oysters with Yuzu Coconut Foam and turmeric-and-dill-laced Cha Ca prepared with Whole Branzino at dinner. The menu, which balances traditional Northern Vietnamese dishes with some California-inspired interpretations, showcases local producers and goes well with a cocktail.
How to book: Reservations are available Resy.

Ancora
Ancora | Photo by Joseph Weaver

Ancora

Mission
$$$$

San Francisco restaurants are seriously blessed when it comes to access to top-notch purveyors, both in terms of quality products and the care with which those products are made or sourced. Joe and Andi Conte are the founders of one of the best sustainable fisheries, Water2Table, and have partnered with chef Nick Anichini (formerly of Atelier Crenn) for a seafood-centric restaurant in the Mission. Ancora, which means anchor in Italian, showcases the best that our local waters have to offer in the form of an ever-shifting menu, available in both prix-fixe and a la carte form. Dishes might include San Francisco anchovies served with Pan Tomate, Half Moon Bay Petrale Sole, and a whole Mt. Lassen Trout for two.
How to book: Reservations are available via OpenTable.

Pie Punks

SoMa
$$$$

What would you say if we told you that there was a place that specialized in not one, not two, but three kinds of pie, alongside fried appetizers, salads, tiki drinks, natural wine, and beer? Would you think you were dreaming? That’s more or less our reaction to news of Pie Punks, a pizza spot in SOMA with, yes, three kinds of pizza—Grandma-style, thin-crust round, and Detroit-style—plus the aforementioned fried things (broccolini, cheese curds, arancini, wings), tiki drinks, and wine. Owner Lane Ford has entrusted partner Pedro Gonzalez with the dough (Gonzalez having honed his chops at Beretta and Delarosa) in partnership with Alvin Luna (formerly the executive chef of Gary Danko). Feast on pizza with a bottle of pet nat or a Henny Colada—a blended colada made with Hennessy!—and take comfort in the knowledge that dreams can, indeed, come true.
How to book: Reservations available for parties of six or larger; call 415-535-2898 to book.

Handroll Project

Mission
$$$$

The newest project from the team behind Michelin-starred Ju-Ni in NoPa, Handroll Project is a simpler, more streamlined approach to chef-driven sushi. While Ju-Ni is all about the high-touch omakase experience, Handroll Project directs its focus to—you guessed it—hand rolls, with equal attention paid to quality ingredients and simple yet stellar flavor combinations (think salmon and ikura, spicy tuna with shiso and shichimi aioli, and A5 Wagyu with garlic chips). The sleek corner space has two sushi counters and seating for 16. In addition to the ten hand rolls on offer (available a la carte or in predetermined sets of five, seven, and ten pieces), find small plates and a thoughtful beverage list including wine, beer, and sake.
How to book: Reservations are available via Resy.

Shuggie’s Trash Pie & Natural Wine
Photo by Erin Ng, courtesy of Shuggie's

Shuggie’s

Mission
$$$$

Walking into Shuggie’s, a restaurant specializing in self-described trash pizza and natural wine, is something of a sensory overload. Bright yellows and greens dominate and chairs shaped like giant hands surround tie dye-esque tables, with gold lame accents popping up everywhere. It’s a proper fun house, and it's glorious, made all the better by the menu of seasonal pizzas and apps that utilize upcycled and offcuts of meat—the Buffalo Everything, for example, includes crisp-fried chicken liver and gizzards alongside wings, and starters always include a rotating fish collar or head glazed in sticky sauce. The grandma-style pizza starts with dough made using whey, and includes toppings ranging from salmon belly conserva with pickle relish, to ground beef and serrano peppers with a scattering of Takis. Whatever you order, pair it with a funky wine from their wide-ranging low-intervention list.
How to book: Reservations are available via Resy.

Available for Reservations
Il Cha
Photo courtesy of Ilcha

Ilcha

Marina
$$$$

Give us some Korean Fried Chicken and soju, and we’re happy. So we’re very pleased to report the arrival of Ilcha, which translates to “first round” in Korean and is the perfect spot to kick off a night out, with comforting and thoughtful Korean fare and an exciting selection of drinks. Housed in the former Nabe hot pot space, Ilcha has maintained the restaurant’s simple, sleek decor, with the addition of a mural featuring a woman in traditional Korean dress. Korean gastropub dishes dominate, including fried chicken, of course, plus tater tots topped with bulgogi and cheese. But you’ll also find a selection of stews and hot pot options, loaded with soybean paste or kimchi, bulgogi or vegetables and, if you’d like, SPAM, plus a tower of pork belly and fresh oysters served with fresh lettuce and perilla sleeves for wrapping. Pair your feast with premium sojus, beers, or makgeolli, a cloudy rice brew.
How to book: Reservations are available via Tock.

Bansang
Photo courtesy of Bansang

Bansang

The Fillmore
$$$$

The group behind Daeho, the San Francisco and Peninsula restaurants that have garnered a cult following for their galbijjim, have a new concept on Fillmore. Bansang, which refers to a manner of table setting fit for kings and nobles, focuses on a menu of modern Korean dishes melded with French and Japanese techniques, in a spacious, light-filled space with wood accents. Chefs Ethan Min and Jin Lim, whose fine dining cred includes time at Saison, Atelier Crenn, and Michael Mina, have created a spread of shareable small plates ranging from a Beef Gochujang Tartare, seasoned with chive creme fraiche and jalapenos, to Radish Kimchi Fried Rice made with soy-braised pork, house-made kimchi, and parmesan cheese.
How to book: Reservations are available via Tock.

Automat
Photo courtesy of Automat

Automat

NoPa
$$$$

A sleek, all-day cafe from former Lazy Bear sous chef Matt Kirk, Automat is a magical blend of low-key daytime staple and nighttime dinner destination. The corner space is elegant and light-filled with pops of turquoise and jewel-tone banquettes, which will suit your needs whether you’re popping in for a breakfast sandwich and a loaf of bread to-go, or for a lengthy sit-down dinner. Expect childhood favorites with a strong dose of creativity and technical prowess, including two breakfast sandwiches served on house-made bread, a cheesy double smashburger, and one of the best new fried chicken sandwiches in the city. During the day, you’ll find a selection of sweet and savory treats, plus loaves of bread (from throwback Wondermat! sandwich loaves to honey tahini whole wheat sourdough bread), while dinner includes refined fare like Tombo Tuna with Sambal, a Pan-Roasted Half Chicken with Green Goddess, and Steak with Fermented Au Poivre sauce.
How to book: Reservations for dinner are available via Resy.

Available for Reservations

This stunner of a collaboration from Liholiho Yacht Club chefs Aimee Arcilla, Kevin Keovanpheng, and Brett Shaw is dedicated to transforming the way the restaurant industry works, attempting to make it more equitable, livable, and healthy. In addition to putting that equity work front-and-center, Good Good Culture Club is all about bold flavors and shareable, heritage-driven plates anchored in local produce and quality products. The menu, which puts an emphasis on Filipino and Laotian flavors, showcases ample wood-fired cooking, making for a backyard party vibe that’s best enjoyed on the restaurant's plant-filled rooftop patio. All the dishes are winners, ranging from a local Cured Halibut with Sweet Potato Aguachile to Grilled Skirt Steak with Misoyaki.
How to book: Reservations are available online.

KAIYŌ Rooftop
Photo courtesy of KAIYŌ Rooftop

San Francisco, a city of impossibly beautiful views, has historically had a dearth of destination-worthy rooftops. That’s beginning to change thanks to openings like KAIYŌ Rooftop, on the top of the Hyatt Place Hotel in SOMA. It’s also another showcase for chef Alex Reccio’s distinctive blend of Peruvian Nikkei cuisine, which marries Peruvian flavors with Japanese technique. In addition to the stunning views—you can scope downtown San Francisco, the Bay Bridge, and Treasure Island while sipping your Suntory highball—the 3,300-square-foot space is lush with plants that set off the gorgeous, jade green tiled bar. The menu runs the gamut from sushi to ceviche, gyozas to empanadas, with a must-try selection of crudo, all of which would be perfect for a cocktail-paired happy hour snack or a full, decadent spread. Don’t sleep on the stellar cocktail program centered around sake, pisco, and Japanese whisky.
How to book: Reservations are available via Yelp.

Taksim
Photo courtesy of Taksim

Taksim

SoMa
$$$$

The team behind beloved Richmond restaurant Lokma has taken their thoughtful approach to Turkish flavors and brought it to SOMA. The two-story space was previously Cockscomb, and maintains some of those industrial-chic vibes, with touches of cozy warmth thanks to an open kitchen with copper cookware on display. Chef Daniel Gribble, formerly of Atelier Crenn, has created a fine dining menu with inspirations from both Turkey and California, which pairs nicely with a standout wine selection. Expect on-point Turkish dishes like Muhammara and Kebabs, which pair seamlessly with Raw Oysters and Branzino and Anchovy Rice Pilaf. Pair everything with fresh-baked flatbreads, made in the restaurant’s wood oven. The wine list deserves some serious attention, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t encourage you to start with a Raki Martini, which puts the anise-flavored Turkish spirit front-and-center.
How to book: Reservations can be made online.

Chuck’s Takeaway
Photo courtesy of Chuck's Takeaway

Chuck’s Takeaway

Mission District
$$$$

Charles Phan, one of SF’s best-known chefs, has long been associated with The Slanted Door, his stunner of a restaurant housed in the Ferry Building that boasts one of the better waterfront locations in the city. But Phan and Slanted Door both got their start in the Mission, which makes the opening of Chuck’s Takeaway, his dedicated sandwich shop, all the more fitting. The pocket-sized space is designed for takeout only, complete with warm wood shelving filled with pantry products (courtesy of Phan’s own line, Wo Hing General Store), cookbooks, and local ceramics. As for the sandwiches, there are six options available, all served on house-made bread. In fact, everything is made in-house, including the pate for Vietnamese-style banh mi, the pickles which are served on the side, and the mayonnaise. In addition to banh mi, find egg salad on milk bread and a classic Meatball Sandwich doused in tomato sauce.
How to book: Order online for takeout.

Birch & Rye

Noe Valley
$$$$

A modern Russian kitchen, Birch & Rye is a true newcomer to San Francisco’s food scene, showcasing wide-reaching historic and geographic interpretations of Russian cuisine through a California lens, courtesy of chef-owner Anya El-Wattar. The bright, airy Noe Valley space is replete with welcoming wood tones, neutral shades and, appropriately, birch trees. Some dishes may appear familiar to lovers of Eastern European fare, but Birch & Rye’s iterations of Borscht, Pelmeni, and Stroganoff have a decidedly modern, California-influenced vibe. Other hits on the changing menu may include Smoked Sturgeon, Black Cod with Salmon Roe, and Wagyu beef served with roasted cabbage. Naturally, the caviar service is well worth exploring, and pairs wonderfully with vodka, a selection of cocktails, and a wine list showcasing Californian, French, and Georgian varietals.
How to book: Make reservations via Tock.

Sorella
Photo by Hardy Wilson, courtesy of Sorella

Sorella

Nob Hill
$$$$

Acquerello, truly one of the grande dames of San Francisco restaurants, has a new little sister—Sorella, a casual restaurant and bar with a next-level menu of fresh pastas, cocktails, Italian wines, and cicchetti at the bar. The corner restaurant boasts floor-to-ceiling windows, seating options that range from booths to barstools, and some of the best neon art we’ve seen—a pair of lips slurping up a noodle that unwinds to spell the restaurant’s name. The menu is flavor-forward and well-executed without being fussy, with handmade pasta being the star of the show and preparations including Tonarelli with Sea Urchin and Salmon Caviar, Short Rib Agnolotti with black trumpet mushrooms, and Porcini and Corn Ravioli with buttermilk and smoked butter. While we certainly could live on pasta alone, don’t skip the cocktail-ready cicchetti menu which features elevated snacks like Cacio e Pepe Potato Chips and Anchovy Toast with black truffle and cultured butter.

Available for Reservations
San Ho Won
Photo by Eric Wolfinger, courtesy of San Ho Won

San Ho Won

Mission
$$$$

Few new restaurants have been as hotly anticipated as San Ho Won, chef Corey Lee’s homage to the Korean comfort food of his childhood. While decidedly more homestyle than Lee’s venerated Benu, expect plenty of fine dining finesse. The sleek, striking space, dominated by earthy wood tones, has plenty of comfortable booths to pack a crew in for a barbecue-centric feast, plus bar top seating for a more intimate option. The menu includes everything from specialty banchan to soups and stews and, of course, an ample selection of barbecue with cuts including classic galbi, beef tongue, and a whole-marinated Cornish hen. Don’t skip Lee’s takes on traditional Korean dishes, including a blood sausage-topped Korean Pancake, Chicken and Ginseng Jook with Abalone, and Kimchi Jigae prepared pozole-style with hominy and avocado. Or skip making hard choices and go for the family-style house menu for the table.
How to book: Reservations can be made via Tock.

Lauren Sloss is a San Francisco-based travel, food, and music writer who has done stints in Philadelphia, New York, London, Istanbul, and aboard a 32-foot sailboat. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter.