Entertainment

Everyone's Flipping Out Over Timothee Chalamet's Resemblance to Snoke from 'Star Wars'

Despite high marks from critics and a $1.3 billion worldwide box-office gross, Star Wars: The Last Jedi's stands out in the saga as the most polarizing entry among Star Wars fans. The Force Awakens asked burning questions many imagined would payoff throughout the new trilogy: who were Rey's parents? How did Kylo Ren wind up in the grasp of the Dark Side? Who was the towering shadow figure known as "Snoke"? The Last Jedi wasn't interested in paying off the mysteries -- much like life, the film suggested, shit just happens. You don't have to be special to be a villain or a hero.

​​​ But the enigmatic life and death of Supreme Leader Snoke leaves the door open for what fans actually love: new Star Wars movies. Which brings us to rising star Timothée Chalamet, the 2018 Academy-Award-nominee for the celebrated romantic drama Call Me By Your Name. Where did Snoke come from? What was his life like before succumbing to the Dark Side? A mind-blowing, new tweet is forcing diehard fans of the 22-year-old sensation to ask hard questions.

Chalamet is having a moment. Between his Oscar love for Call Me By Your Name and his terrifyingly on-point portrayal of a young douchebag in Lady Bird, he's already been called a "young Leonardo DiCaprio," "young Christian Bale," and "young Daniel Day-Lewis." But this marks the first time anyone has called him a "young Snoke."

The massive wave of attention does not seem to phase Chalamet. When asked by GQ if he could enjoy the pleasure of being adored by millions while knowing it could all go away in a heartbeat, the actor gave a gun-ho, "Fuck yeah!"

"While it's going on, I'm going to enjoy every second of this -- it sounds cheesy, but I think of myself as an actor third, an artist second, and a fan first," he said. "But I have genuine fear of having the inability to replicate this moment again."

Like so many heartthrobs, internet chatter is swirling over what Chalamet will do next. Already on the slate are Beautiful Boy, a drug addiction drama based on the memoir by David Sheff; co-starring alongside Selena Gomez in Woody Allen's A Rainy Day in New York (which, after sparking controversy, convinced Chalamet to donate his entire salary to Time's Up initiative); and a role as Henry V in the upcoming Netflix original movieThe King.

But this is Hollywood, and after losing out to Tom Holland for the role of Peter Parker in Marvel's Spider-Man: Homecoming, it seems only logical that Chalamet would find a blockbuster worthy of his talent. Enter: Supreme Leader Snoke.

In anticipation of The Last Jedi's home-video premiere in March, legendary special-effects company Industrial Light & Magic released a exemplary look at the making-of the fully CGI villain, brought to life using performance-capture technology by actor Andy Serkis. The modeling and detailing that went in to animating the wicked Force-wielder is, simply put, stunning. There was also a bonus: The video gave fans their first crystal clear look at Snoke, and the revelations came flooding in.

Somewhere in the process, Snoke began looking like Timothée Chalamet. Twitter doesn't want to believe it, but the collective fan chatter can't believe their eyes. He kinda sorta maybe does, actually.

Not everyone was happy.

Others felt inspired.

Imagine it: Timothée Chalamet in… Snoke: A Star Wars Story.

Fans can only dream, but the good news is Timothée, who knows a thing or two about fandom (ask Frank Ocean), has already imagined himself in the Star Wars universe. He doesn't see the resemblance between him and Snoke. He does think he could play a familiar beeping, booping droid.

Until we get a straight answer on the origins of Snoke, we'll stick with the "Timothée Chalamet won an Oscar and grew up to inherited Sith mantle" theory. There's no reason to think otherwise.

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Wes Rendar works for the fans, not the critics.