Lifestyle

Gentlemen Racers, Jacques Costeau's New Legacy, Hacking Hacks: Morning Report 10/14/13

"... to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before." - Captain Kirk 

It's a year today since Felix Baumgarter barreled down through the cosmos, reaching a speed of Mach 1.25, having jumped from 127,852 feet. Whatever your "127,842 feet" is, take the leap. [Pictured Above: Red Bull Stratos]

Relevant and less-than-relevant goings-on from around the interwebs:

  • Everyone's gotta start somewhere: Google's big break. And you yourself might start with a Personal Search Engine. [Slate, PSE Personal Search Engine]
  • Annoyed when the telemarketer tells you they "know how you feel" or that they "understand"? Computational voice analysis would suggest that they do. [NYT]
  • Banksy was selling originals over the weekend at Central Park. It was all done, expectedly, under anonymity as "spray art." Quite the lucky beginning a possible art collection that doesn't require going broke, looking like a fool, and becoming "Snooty McArtcollector." [Animal, GQ]
  • A global quest to revive — or at the very least pay homage to a dying breed of gentlemen racers. [The Gentleman's Guide to Racing]
  • Fabien Costeau, grandson of famed oceanographer Jacques, is on a quest of his own: Mission 31. He and his team of fellow aquanats will spend a month (31 days to be exact) on the ocean floor at Aquarius Reef Base conducting various research and beating his grandfather's former record of 30 days straight in a deep outpost, a record set 50 years ago today. [Indiegogo]
  • Virtual reality? Sort of. More of an imaginary reality. The future of sports apparently lies in a similar foundation as video games. [Fast.Co Exist]
  • Gentleman Hacker: 30 life hacks hacked and, thereby, debunked. [Mental Floss]
  • It's a dance party. It's a mance party. [Saturday Night Live via YouTube]

Also, did you know... If two pieces of metal touch in space, they become forever bound together. It's called cold welding. [Wikipedia]