Lifestyle

Here's What 10 Famous Movie Mansions Would Cost In Real Life

Published On 04/17/2015 Published On 04/17/2015
Cost of movie mansions
Marvel Studios

Ever wonder what it would cost to live like a king in Tony Stark's cliffside Malibu pad? Or maybe like a pampered prince in Richie Rich's mammoth estate? It's no secret that the homes you see on screen are just the facades used for filming and couldn't be further from where the story takes place, but to answer those questions, we tapped real estate expert David Maez—broker and Co-owner of VIVO Luxury—to help us put an estimate on the cost of these palaces. If they were actually where the film suggests they are.

Many of these gargantuan mansions were famous long before the cameras started rolling, and their price tags reflect their storied past. "The broker could essentially argue that since the home carries the 'fame' factor it's worth an inflated amount," Maez says. "It's really how much that person will pay for owning a famous home." And in some of these cases, you're paying a whole hell of a lot.

Warner Brothers

Richie Rich

The Biltmore Estate
Estimated cost: $4 Billion
Macaulay Culkin in his prime tore it up in his sprawling, palatial mansion. Who needs friends when you have your own fleet of go-carts? Though the movie was set in Chicago, the exteriors were actually filmed at the historic Biltmore Estate in North Carolina. Given the historical significance and whopping 178,926 square feet, the Biltmore, still owned by a descendant of the Vanderbilts, is worth about $3 billion. Adjusted for Chicago's pricey real estate and including the fame factor, our contact would put this around $4 billion. Not so wild when you consider this Chicago home hit the market for almost $19 million, at just a fraction of the size of the Biltmore.

Realtor.com

Scarface

El Furedis
Estimated cost: $40 million
Far from the drug dens of Miami, this Montecito, California home was designed by famous architect Bertram Goodhue, and is currently on the market for $34 million. A similarly-designed home with pool out front and columned facade and comparable square footage (10,000 sqft) in Miami Beach would set you back $12,500,000. But according to Maez, a home with all the cache of Montana's digs (which in real life has played host to Winston Churchill and J.F.K.) located on a pricey South Beach block would likely cost a cool $40 mil.

Marvel Studios

Iron Man

Tony Stark's Mansion
Estimated cost: $100 million
Tony Stark’s epic abode was filmed from a vantage on Point Dume in Malibu, though the house doesn’t actually exist. This comparably-designed mega mansion in Beverly Hills includes rotating display platforms for cars, a movie theater, and even custom martini bar, and is going for $85 million. Tony would probably feel right at home. Given the water views of the Malibu version, Maez postulates it would got for about $100 million if it actually existed on that lot.

Wikimedia Commons

The Dark Knight

Mentmore Towers
Estimated cost: $32 million
To get Bruce Wayne's Gothic Tudor mansion, Christopher Nolan ironically had to stray pretty far from Gotham. The latter two films of the trilogy had exteriors shot in Buckinghamshire, UK. The palace was recently appraised for $32 mil, but costs would likely skyrocket given the custom Bat Cave. 

Wikimedia Commons

Billy Madison

Parkwood Estate
Estimated cost: $80-100 Million 
Though there are no concrete references to an actual location in this town where grown men inexplicably need elementary school educations to run a company, many believe Billy Madison to take place in a California suburb. Minus the penguins, if the famous Canadian Parkwood Estate where it was filmed were to be on the market in SoCal, it'd fetch about $80-$100 mil. 

Beverly House Estate

The Godfather

Legendary Beverly House
Estimated cost: 
$135 million
A far cry from most of the film's New York location, this home produced arguably one of the most iconic moments in movie history. You can own the property where John Woltz discovered his beloved horse's head in between his bedsheets for a mere $135 million. This pad is no stranger to fame, once owned by publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst. Since this home's Beverly Hills 'hood is fairly close to the ambiguous "Hollywood" location where Vito Corleone does the deed, it stands to reason the pricing is comparable. 

20th Century Fox

Edward Scissorhands

Gothic Mansion
Estimated cost: 
$20-40 Million
This one took some extrapolating. The facade of Edward's foreboding fortress was just a set made by Fox. Scissorhands is another flick with no specific setting, giving off an "EveryTown, USA" vibe, but many purport it to be California suburb like Burbank. Given the lack of towering, dilapidated castles in Burbank to compare it to, Maez puts a comfortable estimate of $20-40 million on the place. Minus intricately pruned shrubbery. 

Wikimedia Commons

Blade Runner

The Ennis House
Estimated cost: $15-20 million
The futuristic home in Blade Runner is actually an architectural marvel by Frank Lloyd Wright seen in dozens of films, from House on Haunted Hill to Rush Hour. Since it's located in L.A. already, the only factor to adjust for is the film's futuristic date of 2019. Right now it's worth about $5-10 million, but given future market inflation, Maez suspects it would go for about $15-20 million. 

Wikimedia Commons

Citizen Kane

Hearst Castle
Estimated cost: $100 Million
The obvious inspiration for Xanadu, Charles Foster Kane's palace, is Hearst Castle. And while there are no concrete valuations since it's not for sale, some put it just shy of $200 million. To move Hearst Castle to the nondescript Florida "Gulf Desert" would lower it from its pricey San Simeon, CA digs, to about $100 million. Perhaps the only bargain on this list.

Wikimedia Commons

Cruel Intentions

Ukranian Institute of America
Estimated cost:
 $48 million
Exteriors of the Ukrainian Institute were used to create the elaborate Valmont mansion. Given its prime 5th Avenue and 79th Street NYC location, it would definitely set you back to live Sebastian's pampered lifestyle. But for that kind of money, you can put it wherever you want.


Ali Drucker is a staff writer for Supercompressor. Her bedroom has a window. So. That's neat. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

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