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Driscoll's New Rosé-Flavored Berries Are Light & Floral Just Like the Wine

At this point in your adult life, there's a good chance you've tasted many a rosé wine with subtle notes of strawberry or even raspberry. But have you ever tasted a strawberry or raspberry that tastes like rosé? Turns out rosé-flavored berries...

Courtesy of Driscoll's

At this point in your adult life, there's a good chance you've tasted many a rosé wine with subtle notes of strawberry or even raspberry. But have you ever tasted a strawberry or raspberry that tastes like rosé? Turns out rosé-flavored berries are a real thing you can eat now, thanks to a feat of fruit engineering by the folks at Driscoll's.

The berry company introduced the limited edition berries -- aptly dubbed Rosé Berries -- on Wednesday, describing them as "beautiful blush colored strawberries and raspberries bred for their unique color and aromatic flavor." Yes, the company literally bred special strawberries and raspberries to look and taste like rosé, all thanks to your seasonal pink wine addiction. You can get your hands on them at Whole Foods Market stores in Northern California or via FreshDirect on the East Coast, according to Driscoll's website. Apparently, you'll have to settle for perfectly delicious non-rosé berries everywhere else.

Driscoll's said the new berries are the product of years of research and development and that they're not genetically modified to taste kinda like wine. 

"Rosé Berries get their beautiful light-pink hue from the non-GMO breeding methods used by Driscoll's Joy Makers," the company said in a press release. "Rosé Strawberries have a smooth, silky, creamy texture that delivers a sweet, peachy flavor paired with a soft floral finish. Rosé Raspberries get their sunset coloring from their parents, the golden and red raspberries. As with the Rosé Strawberry, the flavor profile promises a sweet taste sensation."

Along with the Rosé Berries, Driscoll's also debuted new, super-sweet strawberries and raspberries called the Sweetest Batch. As the name suggests, they're sweeter and richer than your typical berries. They also appear to look a bit darker in color based on the company's press photo (shown above). 

So, uh, how long before someone pairs rosé-berries with their bottle of rosé? 


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Tony Merevick is Senior News Editor at Thrillist. Send news tips to news@thrillist.com and follow him on Twitter @tonymerevick.