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Here's How to Watch the Meteor Shower from Halley's Comet This Week

Published On 10/20/2015 Published On 10/20/2015

This year's "best" meteor shower may have already passed, but you can still watch icy comet fragments burn up and shoot across the night sky as soon as this week -- if you're into that kind of thing.

The fiery cosmic show, or the Orionids meteor shower, is the second and last meteor shower of the year caused by debris from the famous Halley's Comet, following the Eta Aquarids in May. Observers expect to see up to 30 meteors zoom across the sky per hour during the shower's peak just before dawn on Wednesday, October 21st and Thursday, October 22nd, according to a report by Business Insider. All you have to do is get your ass out of bed early enough. 

Depending on how the weather holds up, it should be fairly simple to spot the meteors, seeing as they'll appear to originate in the vicinity of the constellation Orion, hence the shower's name. Just look for the three bright stars that make up Orion's Belt (Hint: not around a cat's neck). However, the meteors will only appear for about a second, so you'll have to keep your eyes glued to the sky in between sips of coffee.

As you might expect, the weather can make or break the quality of the show. Observers in the Southeastern US will have some of the best viewing conditions, according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Steve Travis. But folks in the Great Lakes region and New England likely won't be as lucky, thanks to a weather system and clouds that will spread across the regions, respectively, per the AccuWeather report. Thankfully, you can always watch a live broadcast of the meteor shower on Slooh starting on Wednesday at 8pm ET. 

Hurry and set your alarms before you forget.

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Tony Merevick is Cities News Editor at Thrillist and has fond memories of early morning walks to the park with his dad to watch meteor showers. Send news tips to news@thrillist.com and follow him on Twitter @tonymerevick.

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