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Here's Every Lunar Eclipse You Can See for the Next 10 Years

When is the next lunar eclipse
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A total lunar eclipse isn't quite as rare as a total solar eclipse, but it's still not something you'll see all too often. It's absolutely worth getting out the night of January 20 into January 21 to see the eclipse that will be visible across the United States because you won't be able to see a total lunar eclipse here again until May 26, 2021. 

In fact, you won't even see a partial lunar eclipse in the US until that date. So, get out there and soak up a total lunar eclipse that happens to land on the night of a supermoon. Then, if you really want to, you can use the ridiculous term and tell people you say the Super Blood Wolf Moon. It's absurd, but that's up to you. 

If you miss it and want to plan far, far ahead, here's a list of every lunar eclipse coming up over the next 10 years according to NASA.

January 21, 2019 (total)

Visible in: Central Pacific, North and South America, Europe, Africa. 

July 16, 2019 (partial)

Visible in: South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

January 10, 2020 (penumbral)

Visible in: Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

June 5, 2020 (penumbral)

Visible in: Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

July 5, 2020 (penumbral)

Visible in: North and South America, southwest Europe, Africa

November 30, 2020 (penumbral)

Visible in: Asia, Australia, the Pacific, North and South America

May 26, 2021 (total)

Visible in: East Asia, Australia, the Pacific, North and South America

November 19, 2021 (partial)

Visible in: North and South America, north Europe, east Asia, Australia, the Pacific

May 16, 2022 (total)

Visible in: North and South America, Europe, Africa

November 8, 2022 (total)

Visible in: Asia, Australia, the Pacific, North and South America

May 5, 2023 (penumbral)

Visible in: Africa, Asia, Australia

October 28, 2023 (partial)

Visible in: east North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

March 25, 2024 (penumbral)

Visible in: North and South America

September 18, 2024 (partial)

Visible in: North and South America, Europe, Africa

March 14, 2025 (total)

Visible in: The Pacific, North and South America, west Europe, west Africa

September 7, 2025 (total)

Visible in: Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

March 3, 2026 (total)

Visible in: East Asia, Australia, the Pacific, North and South America

August 28, 2026 (partial)

Visible in: East Pacific, North and South America, Europe, Africa

February 20, 2027 (penumbral)

Visible in: North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asa

July 1, 2027 (penumbral)

Visible in: East Africa, Asia, Australia, the Pacific

August 17, 2027 (penumbral)

Visible in: The Pacific, North and South America

January 12, 2028 (partial)

Visible in: North and South America, Europe, Africa

July 6, 2028 (partial)

Visible in: Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia

December 31, 2028 (total)

Visible in: Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, the Pacific

June 26, 2029 (total)

Visible in: North and South America, Europe, Africa, Middle East

December 20, 2029 (total)

Visible in: North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia


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Dustin Nelson is a News Writer with Thrillist. Follow him @dlukenelson.