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Here's Every Solar Eclipse You Can See Through 2050

The 2017 eclipse | Getty images/Icon Sportswire/Contributor
The 2017 eclipse | Getty images/Icon Sportswire/Contributor

There won't be something that will replace August's stunning, continent-spanning solar eclipse for quite some time. As Alex Young, a solar scientist with NASA pointed out Monday, this was very much a once-in-a-lifetime event. "The last time we had one go from coast to coast was 1918 -- 99 years ago," Young said from Charleston, South Carolina, during NASA's live coverage of the celestial event. But that doesn't mean we can't prepare for the next one.

If you find yourself asking -- after watching videos of the moon taking a bite out of the sun or seeing it unfold through your own glasses or pinhole projectors -- "when is the next eclipse?" you're in luck. We've compiled a list of the partial and total eclipses expected to be visible from any and all parts of North America through the year 2050. The list below is a curated one based on predictions published by Fred Espenak of NASA's Goddard Space Center in 2008, and includes some information on whether or not they'll be partial, total, hybrid (which depends on the viewer's location) or annular (sporting a bright ring around the moon).

August 11, 2018 (Partial)

Partially visible in: Northeastern Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Arctic Ocean, Scandinavia, Northern British Isles, Russia, Northern Asia

January 6, 2019 (Partial)

Partially visible in: Northeastern Asia, Southwestern Alaska, Aleutian Islands

June 10, 2021 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Northern Canada, Greenland, Russia
Partially visible in: Northern North America, Europe, Asia

October 14, 2023 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Western United States, Central America, Colombia, Brazil
Partially visible in: North America, Central America, South America

April 8, 2024 (Total)

Totally visible in: Mexico, Central and Northeastern United States, East Canada
Partially visible in: North America, Central America

August 12, 2026 (Total)

Totally visible in: Arctic, Greenland, Iceland, Spain, Northeastern Portugal
Partially visible in: Northern North America, Western Africa, Europe

January 26, 2028 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Suriname, Spain, Portugal
Partially visible in: Eastern North America, Central and South America, Western Europe, Northwest Africa

January 14, 2029 (Partial)

Partially visible in: North America, Central America

June 12, 2029 (Partial)

Partially visible in: Arctic, Scandinavia, Alaska, Northern Asia, Northern Canada

November 14, 2031 (Hybrid)

Hybrid visible in: Pacific, Panama
Partially visible in: South United States, Central America, Northwest South America

March 30, 2033 (Total)

Totally visible in: Eastern Russia, Alaska
Partially visible in: North America

September 12, 2034 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Chile, Bolivia, Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil
Partially visible in: Central America, South America

March 9, 2035 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: New Zealand, Pacific
Partially visible in: Australia, Mexico, Antarctica

August 21, 2036 (Partial)

Partially visible in: Alaska, Canada, Arctic, Western Europe, Northwest Africa

January 5, 2038 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Cuba, Dominican Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Egypt
Partially visible in: Eastern North America, Northern South America, Atlantic, Africa, Europe

July 2, 2038 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Colombia, Venezuela, Mauritania, Morocco, Mali, Niger, Chad, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya
Partially visible in: North and Central America, South America, Africa, Europe, Middle East

June 21, 2039 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Alaska, north Canada, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Russia
Partially visible in: North America, Western Europe

November 4, 2040 (Partial)

Partially visible in: North and Central America

April 9, 2043 (Total, non-central)

Totally visible in: Northeast Russia
Partially visible in: Northern North America, Northeast Asia

August 23, 2044 (Total)

Totally visible in: Greenland; Canada's Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Alberta, Southwestern Saskatchewan; Montana, North Dakota
Partially visible in: Northern Asia, Western North America, Greenland

February 16, 2045 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: New Zealand, Pacific
Partially visible in: Australia, Hawaii

August 12, 2045 (Total)

Totally visible in: Southern United States, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Guyana, French Guyana, Suriname, Brazil
Partially visible in: North, Central and South America, Western Africa

February 5, 2046 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Papua New Guinea, Hawaii, California, Oregon, Idaho
Partially visible in: Australia, Western United States

January 26, 2047 (Partial)

Partially visible in: Eastern Asia, Alaska

June 23, 2047 (Partial)    

Partially visible in: Northern Canada, Greenland, Northeast Asia

June 11, 2048 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Midwestern United States, Quebec, Ontario, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia, Afghanistan
Partially visible in: North America, Caribbean, Northern Africa, Europe, Western Asia

May 31, 2049 (Annular)

Ring shape visible in: Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Nigeria
Partially visible in: Southeastern United States, Central America, South America, Africa, Southern Europe

November 14, 2050 (Partial)

Partially visible in: Northeastern United States, Eastern Canada, Northern Africa, Europe

For more upcoming eclipse dates in the 21st century, read NASA's full list compiled here.

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Eric Vilas-Boas is a writer at Thrillist and runs the animation website The Dot and Line. Follow him on Twitter: @e_vb_