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Crayola Wants You to Name Its Brand New Shade of Blue

Adults do not typically color with crayons, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t. And Crayola, the leading purveyor of crayons and all of their waxy, potentially volatile joy, is helping spread this message to grown-ups with its latest campaign. That’s right, Crayola wants you to name its newest blue crayon, which under the provisory name “YInMn Blue,” sounds more like a distant planet from a science fiction novel than a coloring tool.

While naming crayons is fun, the YInMn’s back story is actually quite intriguing, and might inspire your efforts in the naming contest. The vibrant hue was discovered in 2009 by scientists at Oregon State University, when an experiment went slightly awry, leading to the new color. As Vice points out, it’s the first new blue pigment discovered in the last 200 years, meaning it’s the bluest blue since before the Civil War. The crayon will be released later this year as part of Crayola’s newest 24-piece box set, while the trusty “Dandelion” pigment is being phased out after a 27-year run.

As for the contest, five finalists will be selected on July 1, and people will ultimately vote online for the winning name. "Fans in North America have told us through previous polls and surveys that blue is their favorite color. Now, not only will they have a new blue color to fall in love with, but also the opportunity to be a part of Crayola history by naming it," Melanie Boulden,  Crayola's senior vice president of marketing said in a statement.

If you'd like to submit a name for the new crayon, check out the contest form. The future of blue could very well be in your hands for the next 200 years. 

[h/t Vice]
 

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Sam Blum is a News Staff Writer for Thrillist. He's also a martial arts and music nerd who appreciates a fine sandwich and cute dogs. Find his clips in The Guardian, Rolling Stone, The A.V. Club and Vice. He's on Twitter @Blumnessmonster.