Tech

6 Photo Apps That Might Be The Next Instagram

Published On 08/21/2015 Published On 08/21/2015
iStock/Csondy

Social media is all fun and games... until your mom starts commenting on everything you post and you begin to notice all the highly questionable accounts your dad "likes."

To keep ahead of this parental learning curve you need to stay on top of the social media game. Here are six apps that have a legitimate shot at the photo-sharing throne, all hoping to knock Instagram off its Valencia-filtered pedestal.

Hyper

Hyper

Best for: Lovers of hashtags
iOS: Free
Android: Not available

This recently-launched app describes itself as a mixture of Reddit and Instagram, which is actually kind of scary -- like crack mixed with Tetris levels of technological addiction. Hyper lets users share multiple photos in one post, and repost things straight from the web (no camera roll involved). Instead of focusing on other, specific friends, Hyper's goal is to have users follow hashtags and themes, effectively creating "channels" for people to check out (or stay away from) specific types and styles of photos. So basically, you'll never have to see another #BrunchShot again. Unless that's all you want to see -- then you'll be able to do it much more efficiently. 

Shots

Shots

Best for: People sick of cyber-bullying; Floyd Mayweather
iOS: Free
Android: Free

Are you tired of people leaving cruel/unfunny/spam-filled comments on all your photos? Shots, a "simple and fun" photo sharing app -- headed up by King of Twitter John Shahidi -- is a way to post on social media while avoiding all the messy cyber-bullying and negative outbursts that plague the comments sections of the web. And with users like Justin Bieber and Floyd Mayweather, they certainly are putting that "no negative comments" rule to good use. Shots also prides itself on being a place where original photos are born and shared, so no re-posts!

EyeEm

EyeEm

Best for: Those looking for a more professional, grown-up alternative to the 'gram
iOS: Free
Android: Free

EyeEm is a free app that focuses on letting users take professional-level, uncropped photos, with a multitude of customization options. One feature that raises EyeEm above the standard photo-sharing pack, is an option that automatically tags a photo with a topic, location, and theme, then curates these photos into a never-ending stream for users to scroll through. If you find the 'gram a little too... juvenile, EyeEm might be the adult solution (and you can post "adult" photos too, as long as they're tasteful). 

Moju

Moju

Best for: Early adopters; lovers of motion sensors
iOS: Free
Android: Not available

Moju's major selling point is motion. Not only does it allow users to capture quick, Instagram-esque videos, it also uses motion sensors to create a totally new social experience for anyone looking to "shake up" their social game. You can capture up to 24 frames a second, and utilize the app's motion capability to make a "moving picture" to share with your friends. Because really, what's a selfie if you can't see every angle of your buddy's mug with a flick of your wrist... right?

Flickr

Flickr

Best for: People who take a massive amount of photos
iOS: Free
Android: Free

I know what you're saying -- Flickr is nothing new. And you're right, the photo sharing medium that actually appreciates work of the highest quality has been kicking around since '04 and has a reported user base of 87 million+. But their revamped mobile app has been making waves in the mobile photo community with their enhanced aesthetic, the ability to create massive, hi-def sharable albums, and the option to save full-sized pics. And it's all contained in an easily digestible, familiar package. The real contender to the "new Instragram" moniker might not even be new, after all.   

Hipstamatic

Hipstamatic

Best for: People who appreciate old-school photography
iOS: $1.99
Android: Not available

Though you have to fork over $1.99 for this questionably-named app, the hundreds of glowing reviews on the app store for Hipstamatic may be on to something. This could (and maybe should) be classified as an Instagram-enhancer, and not a straight up replacement, as the analog-themed app with a plethora of different lenses, filters, and customization options easily allows your creations to be shared on the aforementioned platform. But, with an option to receive your throwback photos printed and delivered straight to your door, you could make the argument that it's bringing photo-sharing back to real life. Where it (maybe) belongs.


Wil Fulton is a staff writer for Supercompressor. He is still probably going to use Instagram for his #brunchshots, but might think about switching in the near future. Follow him @WilFulton 
 
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