Travel

A Guide to Canadian Slang, According to Canadians

Published On 01/11/2016 Published On 01/11/2016
Lee Breslouer/Thrillist (edited)

Because simply peppering your sentences about Justin Bieber with “eh” isn’t convincing anybody that you’re from Canada, we asked real-life Canadians for the lowdown on their most common slang words. And not surprisingly, they were extremely happy to help.

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B'y

Where you're likely to hear it: Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada
What it means: An affectionate way to refer to a friend (usually of the same gender), and simply another word for “hey you,” “buddy,” “dude,” or “guy."
How it’s used in a sentence: "Goin' out on da tear tonight wit da b'ys eh!"
 

2-4

Where you're likely to hear it: Montréal
What it means: A case of 24 beers.
How it’s used in a sentence: “I'm going to the dep to pick up a 2-4 for the game.”
 

Back bacon

Where you're likely to hear it: Across Canada
What it means: It’s lean, cured cuts of meat from the back of the pig served in thick, round slices. So, yes, Canadian bacon.
How it’s used in a sentence: “Yeah, can I get two eggs and a side of back bacon, please?”

Sergei Bachlakov / Shutterstock.com

Giv'n'er

Where you're likely to hear it: Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada
What it means: To push hard, go balls out, or give it your all.
How it’s used in a sentence: "I was at pick up last night just giv'n'er, and i got the goal!"
 

Chirp

Where you're likely to hear it: Montréal
What it means: To talk smack.
How it’s used in a sentence: "They were chirping each other before the game hard, could get messy!”
 

Cinq à sept

Where you're likely to hear it: Montréal
What it means: It’s the equivalent of “happy hour.” Pronounced “sank-a-set,” which translates to “5 to 7.”
How it’s used in a (weirdly specific) sentence: “We’re headed to the W Montréal Living Room for cinq à sept. Are you meeting us?

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Life money

Where you're likely to hear it: Vancouver, British Columbia
What it means: Describes how lifestyle can be a currency. When you're doing something incredible that money can't buy: being with friends at a music show, riding the cleanest wave ever, etc.
How it’s used in a sentence: He tagged a picture of hiking near Garibaldi Lake with, “Life money well spent.”
 

Go out for a rip

Where you're likely to hear it: Toronto, Kingston, across Canada
What it means: To go out and have an easy-going, laid-back time.
How it’s used in a sentence: "Hey, I'll pick you up in a few, and we'll go out for a rip."
 

Gutfoundered

Where you're likely to hear it: Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada
What it means: Pronounced like "funded," it means to be extremely hungry or famished.
How it’s used in a sentence: "I was gutfoundered last night till I got some cod tongues and poutine."

Sergei Bachlakov / Shutterstock.com

Puck bunny

Where you're likely to hear it: Montréal, across Canada
What it means: Women who date hockey players.
How it’s used in a sentence: "She doesn't even like hockey, she's just a puck bunny."
 

Out on the tear

Where you're likely to hear it: Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada
What it means: To go out on the town, party, have a good time.
How it’s used in a sentence: "We were out on da tear last night and the old black rum hit me when I woke up this morning!"
 

Rotted

Where you're likely to hear it: Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada
What it means: When you're angry/disappointed/sad about something, then you're "rotted."
How it's used in a sentence: "I went over to Jake's for Jigg's dinner last night but I was rotted it wasn't salty enough!"

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Andrew Villagomez is a freelance writer and blogger who covers travel, men's fashion, and other lifestyle topics. Along with Thrillist, he has also contributed to Travel + Leisure, Details, Passport, and Essential Homme. Check out his blog, and follow him on Twitter and Instagram at @VeeTravels.

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