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NASA's Images of Veil Nebula Are Simply Incredible

Published On 10/13/2015 Published On 10/13/2015
NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team

Sure, the Laser Floyd show at your local planetarium is probably great. But NASA's new photos of the Veil Nebula prove that, well, the universe is a spectacular-looking place -- in ways that no overhead projector could ever do justice.

The Hubble Space Telescope, which recently celebrated its 25th anniversary (congrats), captured the Veil Nebula, known as the most famous concentration of supernova debris out there. In terms of the space world, that's a pretty great title to hold. It measures 110 light-years, spans six moons, and can be found in a constellation named Cygnus, the Swan. That should all make sense if you speak Klingon. But, for non-scientific folk, here's the translation: the thing is 20-times larger than the sun, and is really, really far away. It's also photogenic as hell.

The important capture is actually composed of six photos that make up only a small portion of this gassy beast. NASA also released a 3-D flyover visualization of the Veil Nebula based on the photos taken from Hubble. Check it all out in high definition -- not to be confused with, um... you know, stuff people do before Laser Floyd shows.
 

The Hubble Space Telescope has been pretty busy this year. Not only did it capture the Veil Nebula, but it also snapped other spectacular photos of the galaxy. Brace your eyeballs for these photos from the last six months:

ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Serge Meunier

Planetary nebula

 ESA/Hubble & NASA

Spiral galaxy 

ESA/Hubble & NASA and S. Smartt (Queen's University Belfast); Acknowledgement: Robert Gendler

Barred spiral galaxy 

ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

Star surrounded by nebula

NASA, ESA, J. Trauger (Jet Propulson Laboratory)

The Lagoon Nebula

ESA/NASA

The Quintuplet Cluster of Stars 

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Kara King is a News Writer at Thrillist and loves planetariums. Send news tips to news@thrillist.com and follow her spaced-out tweets at @karatillie.
 

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