Venue Info

Let’s start with the name. The word Ssäm means “to wrap,” and refers to a Korean dish of wrapped meat, much like a burrito. Now that we’re all experts, let’s dive into David Chang’s egalitarian, East Village hot spot, Momofuku Ssäm Bar. The restaurant’s stools and communal tables have been coveted and constantly full since its inception in 2006, when Chang introduced the Asian burrito to the New York dining scene. And as with most of, if not all of Chang’s restaurants, there’s always a wait, and trust us when we tell you it’s worth it. Chang’s convivial concept features Korean streetfood with global -- primarily local -- influence, with a heavy focus on pork and offal. (Vegetarians, tread lightly: the menu states that vegetarian options are available upon request, but that’s really not the point.) The beverage list features Asian-inspired signature cocktails (Yuzu Kir Royale, Seven Spice Sour) as well as classics, and sizeable selections of sake, beer, and wine. The menu changes daily, but a few staples remain and should be ordered without question: pork buns (a few, at least), kimchi (obviously), fried Brussels sprouts, cured country hams, spicy pork sausage and rice cakes, and an ever-changing, large format Ssäm. At lunch, you can enjoy any of five individual Ssäm options; order extra pancakes.

Momofuku Ssäm Bar New York
New York

Momofuku Ssäm Bar

Momofuku Ssäm Bar
 

Let’s start with the name. The word Ssäm means “to wrap,” and refers to a Korean dish of wrapped meat, much like a burrito. Now that we’re all experts, let’s dive into David Chang’s egalitarian, East Village hot spot, Momofuku Ssäm Bar. The restaurant’s stools and communal tables have been coveted and constantly full since its inception in 2006, when Chang introduced the Asian burrito to the New York dining scene. And as with most of, if not all of Chang’s restaurants, there’s always a wait, and trust us when we tell you it’s worth it. Chang’s convivial concept features Korean streetfood with global -- primarily local -- influence, with a heavy focus on pork and offal. (Vegetarians, tread lightly: the menu states that vegetarian options are available upon request, but that’s really not the point.) The beverage list features Asian-inspired signature cocktails (Yuzu Kir Royale, Seven Spice Sour) as well as classics, and sizeable selections of sake, beer, and wine. The menu changes daily, but a few staples remain and should be ordered without question: pork buns (a few, at least), kimchi (obviously), fried Brussels sprouts, cured country hams, spicy pork sausage and rice cakes, and an ever-changing, large format Ssäm. At lunch, you can enjoy any of five individual Ssäm options; order extra pancakes.